Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Towards a synthesis of formal, non-formal and informal pedagogies in popular music learning
    Informal pedagogy is closely associated with popular music practices, its methods known to engage students in authentic music learning that develops critical and independent thinking skills, social skills, creativity and self-identity, among others. However, formal and non-formal pedagogies also have relevant roles to play in popular music learning in the classroom, though their roles and interactions with informal pedagogy may require exploration. A recent survey conducted in Singapore schools suggests that a significant number of music teachers have never engaged their students in popular music practices, and they have no confidence in adopting appropriate pedagogies to effectively enable popular music learning. This article seeks to address the issue by reviewing relevant pedagogies and how they are employed in popular music programmes in two Singapore secondary schools. I will first examine the current discussion on formal, non-formal and informal pedagogies and their implications for music teaching and learning. Secondly, I will relate the discussion to two empirical case studies which adopt these learning approaches in popular music classes to examine their applications and how they interact in actual classroom situations. Based on this, I will suggest that a synthesis of these pedagogies in constant, complementary dialogue within and beyond the classroom paves the way towards a complete and holistic curriculum and learner experience.
      72  118
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Learning collective free music improvisation as a socio-communicative endeavor: Preservice teachers’ journey in a teacher preparation course in Singapore
    In this exploratory case study, I examined how preservice music teachers (PMTs) developed collective free music improvisation (CFMI) competencies in a teacher training program in Singapore. Nine PMTs participated in the 6-week course, where they acquired CFMI skills following a curriculum derived from improvisation and free improvisation literature. Data obtained through video recordings of course proceedings, field notes, interviews, and surveys were analyzed through the constant comparative method of analysis. Findings revealed PMTs’ learning processes as a 3-part journey based on recurring behavioral traits in each segment. Over weeks of performances, PMTs transitioned from a conservative behavioral state to an increasingly volatile one that challenged socio-musical boundaries, finally establishing unique group identities at the end of their journey. Based on their learning experiences, I provide suggestions to scaffold CFMI training.
    Scopus© Citations 1  64  46
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Facilitating collective free improvisation learning in teacher education
    Collective free music improvisation (CFMI) develops musicians’ relationships, identity, and communication skills and engages musicians from different cultures by tapping into their diversities in the music-making process. It also develops an open attitude toward working with children’s creative potential—by paving the way for open, egalitarian teaching approaches. However, teachers may not know how to incorporate it in their music classes due to the lack of teacher preparation in its practice and pedagogy. This interest article offers a theoretical basis for engaging preservice music teachers (PMTs) in CFMI learning in a teacher preparation course—by drawing on research and the author’s experiences facilitating CFMI classes. In combination with theory, pedagogical strategies that develop PMTs’ free improvisational skills based on a socio-communicative framework are described. These strategies offer practical pathways to introducing free improvisation to PMTs that could motivate and enable them to bring the practice into their future music classrooms.
      41  72