Now showing 1 - 6 of 6
  • Publication
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    We who have no country but our century
    (Routledge, 2017)
    This chapter indicates something of the importance of Wong May's poetry in the contexts both of Singapore and literature globally. It is difficult to estimate the degree to which Singapore informs the Wong's poetry, particularly when the very notion of "Singaporeanness" remains unclear, contested as does ever more genuinely cosmopolitan Singapore's inhabitants' investment in that notion. In 1967, David Ormerod published his anthology of Singaporean and Malaysian verse, A Private Landscape. The volume included several early poems by Wong May, including "The Saw-dust". In another local anthology, The Flowering Tree, Edwin Thumboo included Wong's "Preparation", "Dragon-fly", and "Study of a Millionairess". In his introduction to The Second Tongue, Thumboo appreciatively engages with a poem from Wong's first post-Singapore collection A Bad Girl's Book of Animals, "Summer Guide", the uncertainty is made specific. Picasso's Tears, was published in 2014, signalling a return to publication 36 years after Wong's previous collection, Superstitions.
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  • Publication
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    Singapore literature and culture: Current directions in local and global contexts
    Since the nation-state sprang into being in 1965, Singapore literature in English has blossomed energetically, and yet there have been few books focusing on contextualizing and analyzing Singapore literature despite the increasing international attention garnered by Singaporean writers. This volume brings Anglophone Singapore literature to a wider global audience for the first time, embedding it more closely within literary developments worldwide. Drawing upon postcolonial studies, Singapore studies, and critical discussions in transnationalism and globalization, essays unearth and introduce neglected writers, cast new light on established writers, and examine texts in relation to their specific Singaporean local-historical contexts while also engaging with contemporary issues in Singapore society. Singaporean writers are producing work informed by debates and trends in queer studies, feminism, multiculturalism and social justice -- work which urgently calls for scholarly engagement. This groundbreaking collection of essays aims to set new directions for further scholarship in this exciting and various body of writing from a place that, despite being just a small ‘red dot’ on the global map, has much to say to scholars and students worldwide interested in issues of nationalism, diaspora, cosmopolitanism, neoliberalism, immigration, urban space, as well as literary form and content. This book brings Singapore literature and literary criticism into greater global legibility and charts pathways for future developments.
    Scopus© Citations 1  15
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    Creating a Technology-rich Authentic Learning Environment (TALE): Using a mobile app to engage students in real world learning for Elements of Business Skills
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2023) ;
    Koh, Noi Keng
    ;
    Seah, Hock Soon
    ;
    Chow, Daryl
    ;
    The current study was a translational study on creating educational effectiveness in secondary schools with students from the Normal (Technical) (NT) stream studying the Elements of Business Skills (EBS) subject. This expanded on an earlier study at NIE with EBS students (Koh, 2012) that investigated whether students learnt better when they were able to make meaningful connections between the school curriculum and their learning experiences outside of school at workplace environments. The findings revealed that experiential learning gained from the authentic environment of students’ work attachment contributed to their conceptual understanding of the EBS subject. The study also noted a cross transfer of knowledge and skills from the classroom to the workplace and vice-versa. The aim of this TALE study was to investigate how technology, in the form of a mobile learning application, can enable redesign of the formal curriculum to be expanded to seamlessly accommodate learning that occurs outside of classrooms to align with the goals of the ICT mp4. Mobile learning can be defined as “any kind of learning that takes place inside or outside traditional learning environment via mobile devices [that] are able to move with the learner to allow learning anytime, anywhere” (Alavi, Nematbakhsh, & Zeraati, 2018, p. 113).
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