Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Supporting the understanding of cardinal number knowledge in preschoolers: Evidence from instructional practices based on finger patterns
    (2022)
    Orrantia, Josetxu
    ;
    ;
    Sanchez, Maria Rosario
    ;
    Matilla, Laura
    The acquisition of cardinal numbers represents a crucial milestone in the development of early numerical skills and more advanced math abilities. However, relatively few studies have investigated how children's grasping of the cardinality principle can be supported. It has been suggested that the richness of number inputs children receive influences the acquisition of cardinal numbers. The present study was designed to investigate whether canonical finger patterns representing numbers may contribute to this acquisition. Fifty-one 3-year-olds were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 training conditions: (a) a condition that involved counting and labeling, which has shown efficacy to support the acquisition of cardinality, and (b) a condition in which counting and labeling were enriched with finger patterns. Crucially, we aimed at providing evidence of both training programs in a real-life learning environment where teachers incorporated the training as a group-based activity into their regular schedule of daily activities. Children assigned to the finger-based condition outperformed those who received the counting-and-label training. Findings suggest that finger patterns may have a role in children's cardinality understanding. Furthermore, our study shows that instructional approaches for improving cardinality understanding can be easily and successfully implemented into real-life learning settings.
    WOS© Citations 2Scopus© Citations 5  210
  • Publication
    Embargo
    Mapping skills between symbols and quantities in preschoolers: The role of finger patterns
    (Wiley, 2024)
    Orrantia, Josetxu
    ;
    ;
    Sanchez, Rosario
    ;
    Matilla, Laura

    Mapping skills between different codes to represent numerical information, such as number symbols (i.e., verbal number words and written digits) and non-symbolic quantities, are important in the development of the concept of number. The aim of the current study is to investigate children's mapping skills by incorporating another numerical code that emerges at early stages in development, finger patterns. Specifically, the study investigates (i) the order in which mapping skills develop and the association with young children's understanding of cardinality; and (ii) whether finger patterns are processed similarly to symbolic codes or rather as non-symbolic quantities. Preschool children (3-year-olds, N = 113, Mage = 40.8 months, SDage = 3.6 months; 4-year-olds, N = 103, Mage = 52.9 months, SDage = 3.4 months) both cardinality knowers and subset-knowers, were presented with twelve tasks that assessed the mappings between number words, Arabic digits, finger patterns, and quantities. The results showed that children's ability to map symbolic numbers precedes the understanding that such symbols reflect quantities, and that children recognize finger patterns above their cardinality knowledge, suggesting that finger patterns are symbolic in essence.

      25  13
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Cultural variability in finger representations / Variabilidad cultural en las representaciones con dedos
    (Sage, 2024)
    Sanchez, Maria Rosario
    ;
    ;
    Matilla, Laura
    ;
    Orrantia, Josetxu
    Finger representations are used to count or show quantities. How fingers are lifted to count and the type of representation that we use to communicate quantities have been the focus of studies that have aimed at providing evidence of dominant patterns across cultures. In the current study, we go beyond those studies and investigate intracultural variability. Specifically, whether finger counting habits and finger montring patterns are similar in children and adults. To this aim, a total of 3,210 Spaniard participants took part in this study (637 children and 2,573 adults). All of them were assessed regarding handedness, the way in which they counted with their fingers from 1 to 10 (finger counting) and how they show quantities with their fingers (finger montring). The results showed certain consistency; however, there was substantial variability within each group. Findings are interpreted within the context of current theories reinforcing the relevance of finger patterns to support the understanding of the meaning of numbers.
    Scopus© Citations 1  13