Now showing 1 - 10 of 83
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The role of dialogue in science epistemic practices
    (2019) ;
    Tang, Kok Sing
    Science as a field of study is defined by epistemic practices of questioning, inquiry, argumentation and legitimising scientific knowledge. These epistemic practices shape the kinds of talk in the classroom as scientific knowledge is “talked into being”. The question that we aim to answer with this chapter is “What is the unique function and role of dialogue in learning science epistemic practices?” Discourse analysis is a means to analyse scientific talk to review the mechanisms and patterns through which scientific knowledge is learnt. As such, to develop our argument, we first delve into the theoretical underpinnings based on a sociocultural perspective of dialogue in science education. This is followed by a review of empirical studies in science education that focusses on talk in four key science epistemic practices of questioning, science inquiry, argumentation and legitimising conceptual knowledge. The review provides evidence of dialogue as fundamental to both the enactment and learning of science epistemic practices by scientists and science students. We included a discussion about the way forward for dialogue in science and STEM education research.
    Scopus© Citations 3  176  149
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Relationship among high school students’ science academic hardiness, conceptions of learning science and science learning self-efficacy in Singapore
    (2020) ;
    Liang, Jyh-Chong
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    Tsai, Chin-Chung
    This study used three previously validated instruments, namely Science Academic Hardiness (SAH), Students’ Conceptions of Learning Science (COLS) and Science Learning Self-Efficacy (SLSE) on 431 Singaporean students. Using structural equation modeling, results showed that the SAH commitment dimension a positive predictor explaining both the reproductive (e.g. science learning as memorizing or testing) and constructivist (e.g. science learning as understanding or seeing in a new way) conceptions of science learning as well as all dimensions of students’ self-efficacy among high school students. It was also found that the SAH control dimension is a positive predictor for explaining the SLSE science communication dimension but is a negative predictor for explaining reproductive COLS. Finally, only students with constructivist COLS had significant associations with all SLSE dimensions. These findings suggest that students’ personal commitment to learning science is an important aspect to cultivate since it has the ability to predict conceptions of science learning and self-efficacy. Further, creating opportunities for students to be engaged in learning through constructivist ways—such as designing tasks to help students understand and see phenomena in new ways and occasions for students to apply their science knowledge to solve science problems—is likely to lead to positive self-efficacy in practical science work, science communication, and everyday applications of scientific knowledge. Additionally, students’ engagement in reproductive ways of learning science—such as memorization, testing, and calculating and practicing—could be reduced since these do not contribute to building students’ science learning self-efficacy.
    WOS© Citations 12Scopus© Citations 6  253  351
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Examining the use of emerging technologies in schools: A review of artificial intelligence and immersive technologies in STEM education
    (2023)
    Chng, Edwin
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    ;
    While justifications have been made for emerging technologies’ transformative potential in STEM education, the roadmap for their eventual implementation in schools is underexplored. To this end, we review research works in artificial intelligence (AI) and immersive technologies which have been applied to facilitate STEM learning. Through a systematic literature search, we identified 82 papers and analyzed them for three aspects—(1) types of emerging technologies used, (2) science education goals, and (3) implementation value. Our findings indicate that augmented reality and natural language processing are common technologies used to enhance students’ learning experiences. These technologies helped students build conceptual understanding as well as epistemic practices in science. On the other hand, mixed reality and computer vision were the least popular technologies, which may be indicative of the low maturity of these technologies. Of all the science education goals, social aspects were the least commonly tackled through emerging technologies. Moreover, 58.9% of technological applications transformed science teaching and learning through automated ways of providing individualized feedback to students involved in argumentation and reasoning activities. Finally, based on our findings, we derive three research agenda that we believe would further the eventual implementation of emerging technologies in schools.
    Scopus© Citations 4  158  38
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Evaluating and comparing Singaporean and Taiwanese eighth graders’ conceptions of science assessment
    (2017)
    Lin, Tzung-Jin
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    Lee, Min-Hsien
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    Tsai, Chin-Chung
    Researchers have indicated that assessment practices and methods ought to be tailored to support learners’ construction of meaningful understanding of knowledge. To achieve this aim, understanding students’ conceptions of science assessment would be essential since it will enable us to construct more realistic, valid and fair assessments. Understanding how learners conceptualize assessment would be imperative to serve as an essential reference to properly evaluate their learning progress. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the Singaporean and Taiwanese middle school students’ conceptions of science assessment. Within each country, gender comparisons were also explored. A total of 333 Singaporean and 424 Taiwanese grade eight students were invited to complete a questionnaire named Conceptions of Science Assessment (COSA) to capture their views on science assessment. The results indicated that, first, the COSA questionnaire was valid and reliable for measuring the Singaporean and Taiwanese eighth graders’ conceptions of science assessment, including Surface, Summative, and Formative conceptions. Second, the findings showed that the summative purpose of assessment still dominates in the Taiwanese science classroom, while both formative and summative purposes of assessment are usually perceived in Singaporean science classrooms. In contrast, the Singaporean students had a greater tendency than their Taiwanese counterparts to perceive the surface purpose of assessment as merely a way of reproducing scientific knowledge, and the formative purpose of assessment as improving learning, problem solving and critical judgment. No gender differences were found among either the Singaporean or the Taiwanese students regarding their three science assessment conceptions. The findings suggest that science educators in both countries should provide learners with more opportunities to experience process-oriented science assessment activities and de-emphasize the usage of examination-oriented practices to achieve the sophistication of conceptions.
    WOS© Citations 2Scopus© Citations 3  299  306
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Exploring students' perceptions of learning equilibrium concepts through making Bulan kites
    (2022)
    Anantanukulwong, Roseleena
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    Pongsophon, Pongprapan
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    Chiangga, Surasak
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    This study reports students' perceptions of learning the physics concepts of equilibrium through making Bulan kites. The Bulan kite encompasses indigenous knowledge related to the teachings and ideas found in Islam. After a workshop where students (n = 109) made the Bulan kite under the tutelage of a local expert, students (n = 12) were interviewed to distil their thoughts of the learning experience and their understanding of the concepts. The interviews were transcribed and content analysis was carried out. The findings indicate that students were able to make connections between the ideas of equilibrium and the art of kite construction which is based on indigenous knowledge. The kite making process also presented students with opportunities to be more aware of the value of local indigenous knowledge and motivated them in physics learning. We also discussed how indigenous knowledge can be incorporated meaningfully into physics learning.
    Scopus© Citations 1  35  8
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Journey of science teacher education in Singapore: Past, present and future
    Singapore students boast stellar performance at international benchmarking studies such as PISA and TIMSS. One of the major contributors to the consistently good performance in mathematics and science is the quality of our science teacher education in Singapore. Through a consistent, systematic and continuous system, there is a seamless transition of pre-service teacher education to continuing professional development of science teachers in Singapore. This pathway of science teacher education is important as it enables science teachers to be kept abreast of changing educational innovations. Quality of science teachers is ensured from the first step of recruitment. Prospective teachers undergo a stringent selection process before they are admitted to the National Institute of Education for their pre-service education. Factors such as strong governmental support, resource availability, high quality professional development opportunities that are responsive to changes in educational landscape, and presence of a structure to allow planning and tracking of professional development trajectory ensures quality professional development. As such, science teacher education in Singapore is a compact model that is responsive yet stable, flexible yet structured, bespoke yet inclusive, varied yet focused, and specialized yet accessible. This paper will discuss science teacher education and professional development in the light of the larger Singaporean education landscape. It will also present challenges and way ahead for science teacher education and professional development in Singapore.
    Scopus© Citations 8  260  321
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    STEM education from Asia: Trends and perspectives
    (Routledge, 2021) ; ;
    Teng, P. S.
    Asia is the largest continent in the world. Five out of the top ten high performing economies in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) 2018 are located in Asia. Why do Asian students perform so well in STEM-related subjects? This book answers this by examining the STEM education policies and initiatives in Asian economies, as well as the training programmes undertaken by STEM teachers in Asia. The book is broken into four sections, each accompanied by a passage of commentary that summarizes the key takeaways of the chapters. Section one focuses on STEM policy environments and how various countries have developed policies that promote STEM as an integral part of national economic development. Section two focuses on STEM teacher education in the Philippines and Thailand, while section three focuses on STEM curriculum design, context, and challenges in four Asian economies. The fourth and final section focuses on presenting snapshots of STEM education research efforts in Malaysia, South Korea, and Singapore. Written by Asian academics, this book will provide valuable insights to policy makers, educators, and researchers interested in the topic of STEM education, especially in the Asian context. Chapters 7 and 11 of this book are freely available as a downloadable Open Access PDF under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives 4.0 license available at https://www.taylorfrancis.com
    Scopus© Citations 5  45
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Scissors, paper, stone: How students' deal with conceptual conflicts in an inquiry-based activity
    (2008-02)
    Poon, Chew Leng
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    One of the goals of inquiry-based teaching and learning of science is for students to learn the processes of inquiry and to apply these processes in new situations to construct new knowledge for themselves. Very often, students who are exposed to inquiry activities encounter conceptual conflicts that do not align with their pre-conceived ideas. How these conflicts are resolved provide different types of learning experiences for the learners. Interaction talk during hands-on science inquiry activities provides a good source of information on how students deal with conceptual conflicts and, in particular, how they apply inquiry skills to resolve these conflicts. The analysis of talk in interaction amongst a group of six grade five students in a Singapore school has surfaced at least three ways whereby students construct and shape their learning in an inquiry-based science activity through the ways they deal with conceptual conflicts: (a) domineering voices in a group can prematurely curtail alternative ideas and concepts in dealing with a conceptual conflict; (b) a peer expert in a group can scaffold learning for a student facing a conceptual conflict; and (c) learners draw on inquiry skills to resolve cognitive conflicts arising from anomalous results or behaviours during hands-on investigations.
      139  201
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Developing science teachers’ language awareness to enhance the teaching of disciplinary literacy: A study of teachers’ lesson enactments through the lens of adaptive expertise
    (National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (NIE NTU), Singapore, 2021)
    Seah, Lay Hoon
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    ; ; ;
    Chin, Tan Ying
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    Tay, Linda Poh Ling
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    Chia, Terence Titus Song An
      43  83
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Transforming science practical pedagogy and practice through innovative departmental planning
    (2009-02)
    Towndrow, Phillip A. (Phillip Alexander)
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    Soo, Poh Ling
    "The study investigated the adoption and management of change relating to the teaching, learning and assessment of science practical skills within the science department of a secondary school in Singapore. The intended outcomes of the study featured the development of pedagogy and practices leading to the production of a departmental scheme of work incorporating Science Practical Assessment (SPA) skills. The research also supported a SPA-related professional development community that allowed teachers to share ideas and coach one another during an extensive intervention stage. The teachers involved in the project were also encouraged to reflect on and self-assess their learning as they taught in the laboratory." -- abstract.
      134  262