Now showing 1 - 10 of 36
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Enhancing interactivity for online learning: Swivl Zoom
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2022)
      49  81
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Planning out-of-classroom learning experiences
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2018)
      18  32
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Use of a competency framework to explore the benefits of student-generated multiple-choice questions (MCQs) on student engagement
    (2020)
    Yeong, Foong May
    ;
    Chin, Cheen Fei
    ;
    Student engagement in large Life Sciences classes can be problematic, especially with the course work done outside formal class contact hours. To enhance student engagement with the content outside class time, we designed an assignment spanning one semester that required students to author MCQs. We used Bloom’s taxonomy to evaluate the MCQs. Additionally, we derived a three-level framework to analyse the demands on the student question-setters by determining the competencies required to construct the MCQs. This two tier analysis of MCQs allowed us to gauge the level of student engagement with course materials. The three-level competency framework referred to students’ foundational domain knowledge at level 1 to application and prediction of cellular functions in normal and abnormal situations, within a topic at level 2 and across different topics at level 3. From 40 sample MCQs, slightly over 50% targeted mid- to high-level Bloom’s taxonomy. Slightly under 50% of the questions required attainment of level 2 and 3 competencies for construction. However, we noted a high level of academic engagement and some level of cognitive engagement among several students which are consistent with self-reports in an anonymous student survey conducted after the semester. We suggest that using a competency framework to analyse student-authored MCQs can make explicit students’ efforts at constructing MCQs.
    WOS© Citations 4Scopus© Citations 5  284  209
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Conversational analysis as an analytical tool for face-to-face and online conversations
    Some learning scientists are beginning to investigate social and cultural aspects of learning by examining the interactions between a learner and the environment as well as with other people in the learning environment. This paper proposes Conversational Analysis (CA) as a tool to analyze interactions between learners and instructors in face-to-face and online environments. It illustrates the potential of CA to enhance our understanding of the social aspect of learning by comparing analysis of transcripts in two distinct situations. Through the analysis, distinct characteristic interactions in face-to-face and online environments are uncovered by linking these analyses to the unique affordances of the learning environments.
    WOS© Citations 9Scopus© Citations 14  146  489
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Cogenerative dialogues, emotional conflicts, and polyvagal theory: Links to science learning
    This forum paper offers alternative insights into Pei-Ling Hsu’s “It’s a magic circle”! Using cogenerative dialogues to create a safe environment to address emotional conflicts in a project-based learning science internship. In her paper, she presented how cogenerative dialogues can be used to create an emotionally safe environment for conflict resolutions in a project-based science internship program. She examined the emotions during the cogenerative dialogues using the polyvagal theory. Here, we continue the discussion by raising alternative perspectives to view the events, particularly the “Lucy incident” that was described. We suggest the use of emotional regulation strategies such as situation selection, situation modification, attention deployment, cognitive change and response modulation as a means to enhance the way cogenerative dialogues could be carried out. The main argument on this commentary is that strong emotions cannot be dismissed if cogenerative dialogues are used as a means to resolve conflicts. Rather, participants in cogenerative dialogues need to apply specific emotional regulation strategies so that they can contribute and participate in cogenerative dialogues more constructively.
    Scopus© Citations 1  126  163
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Applying concepts of plant nutrition in the real-world: Designing vertical farming systems
    (2022) ; ;
    Koh, Jaime Li-Ching
    ;
    ;
    Koh, Dominic Jing Qun
    This integrated STEM activity on the design of a vertical farming system has biology as the lead discipline and relates to the concept of photosynthesis. Students investigated the optimal design of vertical farms that will deliver appropriate amounts of water, sunlight and carbon dioxide to plants such that there will be optimal yield. Through design, testing and refinement of their design, students appreciate the connections between photosynthesis, food supply and design.
    WOS© Citations 1  86  8
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Roles of teachers in orchestrating learning in elementary science classrooms
    (2015)
    Zhai, Junqing
    ;
    This study delves into the different roles that elementary science teachers play in the classroom to orchestrate science learning opportunities for students. Examining the classroom practices of three elementary science teachers in Singapore, we found that teachers shuttle between four key roles in enabling students learning in science. Teachers can play the role of (1) dispenser of knowledge (Giver), (2) mentor of learning (Advisor), (3) monitor of students’ activities (Police), and (4) partner in inquiry (Co-learner). These roles are dynamic and while teachers show a preference to one of the four roles, factors such as the nature of the task, the types of students as well as the availability of time and resources affect the role that teachers adopt. The roles that teachers play in the classroom have implications for the practice of science as inquiry in the classroom as well as the identities that teachers and students form in the science learning process.
    Scopus© Citations 8  130  372
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Gender differences in high school students’ interest in STEM careers: A multi-group comparison based on structural equation model
    (Springer, 2023)
    Wang, Ning
    ;
    ;
    Zhuo, Xiaohong
    ;
    Liu, Ke
    ;
    Zeng, Feng
    ;
    Xiang, Jiong

    Background Females are underrepresented in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields all over the world. To encourage more girls to choose STEM majors and careers, it is critical to increase their interest in STEM careers. Many studies have investigated the factors that influence females' entry into STEM fields, but few studies have explored the gender differences in the relationships between these factors. Therefore, based on the Social Cognitive Career Theory, this study explored the gender differences in the effects of environmental factors (school education, informal education, social support, and media) on high school students' interest in STEM careers through the mediating roles of STEM self-efficacy and STEM careers perceptions.

    Results A questionnaire survey was conducted among 1240 high school students in Hunan Province, China, and the results of t-test, regression analysis, and structural equation model multi-group comparison showed that: Firstly, the scores of male students in all the dimensions except for STEM career perception were significantly higher than those of female students. Secondly, the environmental factor that had the greatest effect on male and female students' interest in STEM careers was different. Finally, there were gender differences in the mediating roles of STEM self-efficacy and STEM careers perceptions between environmental factors and interest in STEM careers.

    Conclusions This study revealed the influence mechanisms and gender differences in male and female students' interest in STEM careers in the context of Chinese Confucian culture, and the conclusions are as follows: (1) Male students' interest in STEM careers was significantly higher than that of female students; (2) The environmental factors that had the greatest effect on male and female students' interest in STEM careers were social support and media, respectively; and (3) Environmental factors could affect male students' interest in STEM careers through the mediating roles of STEM self-efficacy and STEM career perception, while environmental factors could affect female students' interest in STEM careers through the mediating role of STEM self-efficacy. Finally, the mediating mechanisms of STEM self-efficacy and STEM career perception between environmental factors and interest in STEM careers, and the importance of STEM self-efficacy for female students were discussed.

    WOS© Citations 1Scopus© Citations 3  15  40
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Learning to be a science teacher: Reflections and lessons from video-based instruction
    (2011) ; ;
    Wettasinghe, Cyraine Marissa
    This paper examines pre-service teachers' reflection on teaching after participating in an online course using videos of micro-skills coupled with self reflection and group blogs. Data sources included 137 online blog entries collected from 26 participants as well as semi-structured interviews with the participants at the end of the course. Larrivee's (2008) four levels of reflection (pre, surface, pedagogical and critical) were used to code the online reflections and content analysis of the participants' views of teaching was carried out with the interview transcripts. Analysis of online reflections showed that 67% of the reflection by pre-service teachers' falls in the pedagogical category and 2% in the critical category. These findings show that these pre-service teachers are capable of engaging in reflection beyond a surface level even with limited classroom experience. The resources that these pre-service teachers used to make sense of teaching are (1) their knowledge of learning theories; (2) their ideas of teachers' roles and responsibilities; and (3) their existing ideas of what makes good teaching. The pre-service teachers' reflection upon their learning showed evidence of willingness to incorporate the learnt ideas of good teaching in their future classrooms teaching. The use of micro-skills videos and reflection allowed them to restructure their pedagogical knowledge through identification, comparison, modification and synthesising.
    Scopus© Citations 8  190  397
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The effect of learning experiences on interest in STEM careers: A structural equation model
    (2021)
    Wang, Ning
    ;
    ;
    Xiao, Wu-Rong
    ;
    Zeng, Feng
    ;
    Xiang, Jiong
    ;
    Duan, Wei
    Learning experiences can affect students' interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) careers. Applying the social cognitive career theory, this study tested and compared the effect size and effect mechanism of formal learning experiences (FLE) and informal learning experiences (ILE) on 1133 tenth-grade students' interest in STEM careers (ISC) through a paper questionnaire survey. The results of structural equation model analysis showed that: 1) The total effect of ILE on students' ISC is much greater than that of FLE; 2) ILE, STEM self-efficacy (SSE) and STEM careers perceptions (SCP) can directly affect students' ISC; FLE and ILE can also indirectly affect students' ISC through the mediating role of SSE and SCP. The analyses suggest that in order to improve students' ISC, STEM education (especially informal STEM education) should be strengthened, both formal and informal education should pay attention to the cultivation of students' SSE and SCP.
    WOS© Citations 4Scopus© Citations 6  158  180