Now showing 1 - 10 of 22
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Exploring the emerging identities of special needs officers in Singapore primary and secondary schools
    (2011)
    Lim, Sirene May Yin
    ;
    ;
    Cohen, Libby G.
    This study explored the ways in which a group of 30 newly qualified Allied Educators (Learning & Behavioural Support), or AED (LBS), grew into their professional role within their school communities and the kinds of responsibilities they faced daily. Many of them were also the only AED (LBS) in their school. Findings revealed that these AED (LBS) took on a spectrum of roles in school and faced a range of expectations, from having to be miracle workers to being relegated to administrative support. The most well-adjusted AED (LBS) were the ones who were in school communities that had a collaborative learning culture, were supportive of students with heterogeneous needs, and were surrounded by more teachers and school leaders who had knowledge in special education.
      460  1367
  • Publication
    Restricted
    From beliefs to practice: Students with visual impairments, teachers and their perspectives on assistive technology
    (2011-03) ;
    Cohen, Libby G.
    ;
    Tan, Denise Ching Ting
    "The primary research questions are: 1. What are the barriers and challenges to using assistive technology by students with visual impairments? 2. What are the classroom pedagogies, beliefs, and practices of teachers of students with visual impairments?--[page 2].
      316  72
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Perspectives of stakeholders on youth with intellectual disabilities transitioning to adulthood
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ; ;
    Transition is difficult for everyone, but it is particularly challenging for youth with disabilities and their families. When these youth transition out of school to post school environments, they will move from a structured environment with clear daily routines, with school personnel who are tasked to teach and support them, to environments where ongoing support and services are not readily available. Some of these youth with disabilities enter work environments that can be impersonal and most of them are unprepared for the level of independence that is required of them (Sitlington, Frank, & Carson, 1992). Many of them will find difficulty forming social networks as an adult and feel isolated in the community (Amado, Stancliffe, McCarron, & McCallion, 2013). Many youth with disabilities leave school with no employment in the near future (Nord, Luecking, Mank, Kiernan, & Wray, 2013) and to further complicate matters, there may be limited places at alternative day activity centres for them (Enabling Masterplan, 2012). These group of youth with disabilities may be inactive, socially isolated, and will continue to rely on family for any social and community interaction (Lichtenstein & Michaelides, 1993; Ow & Lang, 2000).
      166  206
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Exploring the emerging identities of special needs officers in Singapore primary and secondary schools
    (2010-12)
    Lim, Sirene May Yin
    ;
    ;
    Cohen, Libby G.
    ;
    Tan, Denise Ching Ting
    "The study aimed to explore the emerging identities and school responsibilities of a group of AED (LBS) that graduated in 2009 from the NIE Diploma in Special Education (DISE) programme. The project proposal had these research questions as a guide, and these were not changed in the course of the study: 1. How do the AED(LBS) participants view themselves and define their roles in Singapore's diverse school contexts and settings? 2. How do they fit into/ shape their roles in their schools to support children with special needs? 3. How do they create their own communities of learning to further shape their identities and roles? 4. How can their teaching and learning inform their preparation at the NIE (and/or teacher education)?" -- p. 1.
      193  66
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Support for students with visual impairment in higher education in Singapore: Considering university publicity materials conveying disability services and support
    This paper explores online resources in Singapore that reflect the current state of support in higher education for students with visual impairment. In the six institutions of higher education there was evidence of support being provided for students with disabilities ― but the type and extent of support was variable, and messages conveyed to students were mixed. Provisions tend to be generic in nature, and do not necessarily address needs related to specific disabilities. If students with disabilities are to participate in higher education, clearer communication is necessary to enable them to make informed choices with confidence. Information needs to confirm that they will have the requisite support to afford them the opportunities associated with the university experience.
      434  1061
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Assistive technology use amongst students with visual impairments and their teachers: Barriers and challenges in special education
    (2012) ;
    Cohen, Libby G.
    Assistive technologies (AT) enable individuals who are visually impaired to read and write, access information and enhance communication. This study investigated the use of AT by students with visual impairments and their teachers in a special school. While teachers unequivocally recognized the benefits of AT, there were significant gaps and disconnections in AT knowledge and skills amongst teachers. For students, a majority were not using nor had much knowledge of AT. While the school had made some efforts to introduce AT, the experience of students was limited as inconsistencies in use of and access to AT were dependent on teachers' skills and the availability of equipment. Parents, siblings, friends and peers, and other social networks emerged as important sources of influence.
      765  950
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The hopes and dreams for youth with intellectual disabilities
    (SEAMEO Regional Centre for Special Educational Needs, 2023) ; ;
    Transition is difficult for everyone, but it is particularly challenging for youth with ID and their families. When these youth transition out of school to post school environments, they will move from a structured environment with clear daily routines, with school personnel who are tasked to teach and support them, to environments where on-going support and services are not readily available. The purpose of this study is to explore how the various stakeholders envision the future for youth with ID from the perspectives of the individuals themselves, their parents and siblings, and the school personnel. Thirty-three participants from four stakeholder groups (i.e., eight students with ID, 10 parents, six siblings and nine school personnel) participated in this study. The eight student participants were from three special schools. We utilized semi-structured interviews and qualitative research methods to explore the perspectives of stakeholders on youth with ID transitioning to adulthood. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The various stakeholders envisioned a future where the youth with ID will: (a) be meaningfully occupied and/or gainful employed, (b) be independent in managing themselves, (c) be emotionally and/or physically healthy, (d) be safe, and (e) have social lives. The findings provide insights into the stakeholders’ vision of the future for youth with ID and suggest that while working to increase post school options is critical, more importantly, we need to support the family to empower the youth to explore the available opportunities. A family’s hopes and dreams for the youth with ID are often clouded by society’s expectations for people with disabilities. Therefore, the mindsets, beliefs and attitudes of the general public towards the participation of people with disabilities in the society must change.
      12  517
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Improving literacy of the visually impaired in Singapore: Pre-, post- and in-between literacy considerations
    This paper underscores the importance of a multi-prong approach to literacy when considering literacy needs of the visually impaired in Singapore. While acquisition of literacy is often considered as a single prong approach, there is a need to satisfy the pre-literacy; post-literacy and in-between literacy needs if persons with visual impairments are to have equitable access to information. Each of these three prongs is considered in turn focusing particularly on braille, alternative formats and access to such mediums of communication for the visually impaired. These are critical given that it is through multiple modalities that the visually impaired are able to access a diversity of materials. The absence of information in one modality may be available in an alternative format. The needs also extend beyond the young as with the prospect of an aging society looming, the elderly who are predisposed to visual impairment will need to be equipped with literacy skills.
      184  1770
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Supporting students with special needs in secondary schools: a study of perspective, practices, and support structures
    (2011-08) ; ;
    Sarinajit Kaur
    ;
    Khaw, Joanne
    ;
    Ng, Zi Jia
    "This study sought to understand how students with mild disabilities are supported in Singapore mainstream schools."-page 14.
      404  227