Now showing 1 - 10 of 25
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication
Open Access

Multiliteracies in the Singapore English language classroom: Perceptions and practices.

2020, Lim, Fei Victor, Weninger, Csilla, Chia, Alexius Ti Yong, Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha, Tan, Jia Min, Adams, Jonathon, Tan-Chia, Lydia, Peters, Charles Matthew, Towndrow, Phillip A. (Phillip Alexander), Unsworth, Len

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication
Open Access

Fostering 21st century competencies among lower progress learners

2022, de Roock, Roberto, Weninger, Csilla

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication
Open Access

The ‘vernacularisation’ of global education policy: Media and digital literacy as 21st century skills in Singapore

2017, Weninger, Csilla

Technological changes have reshaped communication, social life as well as the conditions of work, challenging schools to foster skills and capacities that help youth to competently and confidently navigate these new socio-technological terrains as workers, citizens and private individuals. Responding to these changes, media and digital literacy have been at the centre of a global policy push to articulate a curricular plan for twenty-first century skills, resulting in numerous frameworks produced by non-governmental and inter-governmental organizations and adopted by national governments. At the same time, scholars have been critical of the overwhelmingly economic rationale behind twenty-first century competencies and of the influence of global edu-business on national education policies, calling for critical analyses that examine the local uptake of globally mobile policy initiatives. This paper investigates media and digital literacy at the nexus of global twenty-first century education initiatives and their local interpretation within Singapore’s education system, with special attention to the role of creative digital production. Drawing on a critical analysis of both international and Singapore policy, as well as empirical data on teacher and student practice, I highlight the selective process of localization and its impact on twenty-first century competencies in Singapore.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication
Open Access

Microcelebrities’ identity construction on social media: A systematic review and synthesis

2024, Xu, Huimin, Csilla Weninger, Chen, Der-Thanq

Over the past decade, a robust body of scholarship on microcelebrity has emerged, occasioning several review studies of this growing field of research. Extant reviews on microcelebrity have mostly focused on microcelebrities’ strategic communication or audiences’ attitudes, but no review has specifically focused on microcelebrities’ identity. Echoing the call for more attention to this particular aspect in recent reviews, this article examines 97 empirical studies published from 2010 to 2022 that focused on microcelebrities’ identity construction on social media. Our analysis identified various research trends and synthesized microcelebrities’ identity tactics into 10 categories. We situate the findings within current discussions of platformized cultural production and microcelebrity’s role in it by drawing on and extending Duffy et al.’s ‘nested precarities’ framework to account for microcelebrities’ identity work on social media. The review’s key contribution is the conceptualization of microcelebrities’ identity-related tactics and its embedding in the formidable precarities of platform ecosystems.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication
Open Access

Media literacy in the teaching of English in Singapore

2020, Weninger, Csilla, Choo, Suzanne S., Hu, Guangwei, Williams, Patrick, Kan, Katy Hoi-Yi

Given the extraordinary pace at which especially new media technologies have developed in the last five to ten years, as well as the unprecedented amount of leisure time youth spend engaging with media such as television, Facebook, or games, there has been greater recognition by scholars, educators, and policymakers of the importance of incorporating media education and media literacy in schools and curricula. Current curricular approaches have moved away from a protectionist rationale toward a concern with supporting youth to become active media users (Buckingham, 2002). This shift towards recognizing youth’s agentive role particularly through digital social media has also led to a focus in media literacy programs on both production and consumption; in other words, fostering youth’s critical and reflective capacities in relation to both their consumption and production of media texts/content. Learner-centered pedagogies that draw on students’ everyday understanding, experience, and use of media in and out of school are advocated (Hobbs, 2011b). Recognizing and building on students’ media experiences is a key principle of media literacy curricula that aim to empower students to become active, reflective, and critical users of contemporary media.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication
Open Access

Multiliteracies in the Singapore English Language classroom: Designing learning

2022, Lim, Fei Victor, Chia, Alexius Ti Yong, Weninger, Csilla, Tan-Chia, Lydia, Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha, Tan, Jia Min, Peters, Charles Matthew, Adams, Jonathon, Towndrow, Phillip A. (Phillip Alexander), Unsworth, Len

We report on the Phase 2 research activities and findings of the NIE/OER Educational Research Funding Programme and MOE CORE 3 project titled 'Integrating Multiliteracies into the English Language Classroom'. The project has two Phases: Phase 1 from March 2019 to December 2019 and Phase 2 from January 2020 to December 2021.

The purpose of this project is first to understand how multiliteracies, specifically multimodal literacy, are currently taught in the English Language subject classroom in Singapore schools and then second, to develop an instructional approach, informed by Systemic Functional Theory, multiliteracies, and multimodality studies, to teach multimodal literacy for upper primary and lower secondary students.

The study adopts a design-based research approach which involved the team of researchers working closely with the teacher-participants in the co-design of lesson packages. The goal of design-based research is to develop contextually-sensitive pedagogical practices and instructional strategies with a focus on the teacherparticipants’ professional learning and growth in the process.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication
Open Access

A semiotic exploration of cultural potential in EFL textbooks

2013, Kiss, Tamas, Weninger, Csilla

This paper introduces a Peircean semiotic approach to analysing the cultural content of EFL textbook materials. It argues that while traditional content analyses may provide valuable insights, they fail to provide a comprehensive picture of the cultural meaning potential of textbooks since they ignore a key element: how language learners interact with texts and visuals imbedded in the framework of a pedagogic task. We demonstrate how cultural meanings can emerge through processes of unguided semiosis, supported by sharing and reflection in a complex, non-linear and essentially dynamic learning environment. For this to happen, however, teachers may need to reconsider their current approaches to teaching culture, embrace complexity, and allow order to emerge from chaos in their classrooms. The paper suggests that collaboratively negotiated and shared (re)presentations of cultural meaning contribute to the development of the learners’ global cultural awareness and prepares them for intercultural citizenship in our globalized world.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication
Open Access

School-based media literacy education: balancing critique, ethics and creative expression

2017, Weninger, Csilla, Choo, Suzanne S., Williams, Patrick, Hu, Guangwei

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication
Open Access

Fostering cross-cultural communication and understanding in the English language writing

2020, Tupas, T. Ruanni F., Weninger, Csilla, Mizusawa, Ken

This study's goal is to explore how secondary school English teachers in Singapore develop 21st century competencies in their lessons. Specifically, the research project has two key objectives: 1) to explore how secondary English language teachers in Singapore facilitate their learners' acquisition of cross-cultural skills in the teaching of writing and representing; 2) to create data-driven principles and strategies for the successful development of cross-cultural skills in the teaching of writing and representing. This research is significant given the introduction of the Framework for 21st Century Competencies and Student Outcomes by the Ministry of Education Singapore (MOE, 2010a, 2010b) which highlights the need to develop skills necessary for living in today's globalized world and in Singapore's multicultural context. Cross-cultural skills are part of the framework's core competencies, along with civic literacy and global awareness, and aim to enable learners to develop a ''broader worldview, and the ability to work with people from diverse cultural backgrounds'' (MOE, 2010a). Interestingly, despite the existence of extensive literature on 21st century skills and intercultural education, empirical research which investigates how teachers work in everyday settings with these concepts is painfully scarce (see e.g. Halualini, 2011). Most published work present conceptual guidelines on how to develop cross-cultural competencies and global awareness. Research that investigates classrooms is therefore lacking and it is this gap that the present research project aims to address. In addition, the results of the project will provide practical, classroom-based guidelines for English language teachers on how to implement the Framework for 21st century Competencies and Student Outcomes and facilitate cross-cultural learning in their lessons. A multi-case study approach is chosen as the methodological framework to gain in-depth understanding of how teachers incorporate (or not) cross-cultural skills in their writing instruction. The case study approach is selected as ''case studies are the preferred method when [...] 'how or why' questions are being posed'' (Yin, 2009, p.2) and they do not require any control, or manipulation, of events and variables within the research context. We define the 'case' as the process of developing cross cultural skills in a unit of work that primarily aims to teach English writing skills in Singapore Secondary 1 and 2 classrooms. The key figure in the research is the classroom teacher as they are the ones who make decisions that facilitate the process that we explore in our project. Therefore, when selecting cases, we focus on the teacher. Six teachers from three secondary schools will be selected as the participants of the research, based on their teaching experience (minimum three years) and their willingness to participate. The research questions investigate the interplay of three key facets of classroom practice: a) teachers' choice and exploitation of teaching materials to develop cross-cultural skills; b) what teachers actually do in the classroom in terms of strategies and techniques used; and c) teacher cognition, i.e. teachers' thinking and beliefs about developing cross-cultural skills. Data will come from three major sources: 1) teaching materials, including the unit and lesson plans any accompanying materials; 2) lesson observation (video recording and field notes); 3) interviews and focus group discussions with teachers. The key deliverable of the project will be the document 'Principles and strategies for the development of cross-cultural skills in the writing classroom'. This will be disseminated to educators through local workshops and conference presentations. Furthermore, project will lead to a follow-up intervention research project which will see the implementation of the principles and strategies outlined in the document.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication
Open Access

Multimodality in critical language textbook analysis

2020, Weninger, Csilla

Increasingly, studies are taking account of multimodality when analyzing language textbooks. Due to the diversity of multimodal frameworks used in analyses, and the interdisciplinary nature of language textbook studies, conceptual differences arise that are important to discuss – which is the purpose of this paper. Specifically, I argue that multimodal analyses of language textbooks can be divided into two groups based on how they conceptualise meaning. One examines how textbooks’ textual-visual content encodes and communicates ideas about the world, treating meaning as representation. A second set of research studies is focused on how multimodal elements in textbooks foster interpersonal relations between text producers and readers, thus viewing the meaning textbooks communicate as interaction. While each approach is valid, I argue that neither places sufficient emphasis on the fact that textbooks are a didactic genre where learners’ engagement with any meaning is heavily guided. As such, critical textbook analysis should attempt to demonstrate the ideological nature of meaning-making by examining the interplay of multimodal representations, the interactive meaning of textbooks’ multimodal material as well as the pedagogic-didactic frame within which learners encounter them. The article utilises an example from a popular English as a foreign language textbook to illustrate these points.