Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    The development of early arithmetic skills: What, when, and how?
    Arithmetic skills – the ability to add, subtract, multiply, and divide – are the building blocks of mathematics. Poor arithmetic skills can lead to poor job prospects and life outcomes. It is thus important to investigate the development of arithmetic skills. What constitute the foundations for arithmetic skills? When do they develop? Previous studies have highlighted the importance of the toddler and preschool period as providing foundations for later math learning. In this chapter, we provide an overview of key factors across domain-specific and domain-general areas that support the development of arithmetic skills. We then draw on existing data from the Singapore Kindergarten Impact Project (SKIP) and describe the performance of basic numeracy skills at entry to kindergarten that are relevant for arithmetic learning. These skills include counting, informal arithmetic, and the reading and writing of Arabic digits. Finally, we conclude with guidelines for promoting the development of early mathematical knowledge in the classroom and at home.
      335
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Preschool teachers’ experiences of work-related stress: A pilot study of Singapore teachers
    (Springer, 2022) ;
    Meow, Emily
    Research has shown that early childhood teachers play a crucial role in supporting children’s development via the provision of socially and emotionally supportive learning environments. However, teachers’ abilities to provide such high-quality learning environments may be hindered by work-related stress. Prolonged exposure to stress is also associated with several undesirable outcomes, including lower job satisfaction and increased motivation to leave the teaching profession. Although research on teacher stress is actively conducted in many countries, very little has been done in Singapore. Yet, considering recent concerns about the high turnover rates of preschool teachers in Singapore and the scarcity of local studies on teacher stress, more research is needed to understand whether and how work-related stress affects preschool teachers in Singapore. This chapter is a first attempt at bridging the knowledge gap between international findings and local evidence. In the first section, we provide a review of the theory and empirical findings on work-related stress in teachers. In the second section, we report findings from a pilot study involving one-to-one interviews with preschool teachers to understand their experiences of stress at the workplace. We highlight common themes as well as unique perspectives that emerged from the interviews. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of our findings and directions for future research.
      597
  • Publication
    Open Access
    “That’s just impossible in my kindergarten.” Advocating for ‘glocal' early childhood curriculum frameworks
    (2020)
    Bautista, Alfredo
    ;
    Bull, Rebecca
    ;
    ;
    Lee, Kerry
    As a result of globalization, kindergarten curriculum frameworks in Asia have been strongly influenced by Western theories, pedagogies, and values. In this article, we argue that Singapore’s Nurturing Early Learners and Hong Kong’s Kindergarten Education Curriculum Guide present key notions that are inconsistent with cultural values that are deeply rooted in these two societies. To overcome the challenges these inconsistencies trigger for teachers, principals, teacher educators, and parents, we advocate for the design of 'glocal' (global/local, explicitly hybrid) curriculum frameworks, based on principles that are culturally appropriate and socially situated. Drawing on recent research studies, we analyze current curriculum/practice gaps in relation to the notions of Child-Centeredness, Quality Interactions, Creativity and Self-Expression, and Play. In seeking the global/local balance that is needed in Singapore and Hong Kong, four alternative glocal notions are proposed: Child-Appropriateness, Pedagogical Quality, Arts Engagement, and Child-Led Activities. We conclude there is an urgent need for generating a solid corpus of local research in both jurisdictions, which should guide subsequent curriculum reforms and teacher preparation models. Our final aim is to contribute to early childhood education policy discussions in Asia, against the background of internationalization.
    WOS© Citations 19Scopus© Citations 23  163  713