Now showing 1 - 4 of 4
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Embodying the nameless and formless Dao: pedagogical lessons on affective education from the Wang Bi Dao de Jing
    According to the Chinese commentator Wang Bi (220-246), the Dao de Jing’s speculations of the Nameless and Formless Dao are in fact metaphors for political strategies for cultivating and nurturing an authentically moral political community. These political strategies prescribe what not to do and what to do when trying to nurture authentic moral growth in others, and are built on many insights concerning the unintended side effects of the political ruler’s public verbal and performative disclosures of his moral judgments. I argue that many of these insights and strategies can be imported into and developed for the classroom context and are useful pedagogies for the educator interested in effectively nurturing moral development in his or her pupils.
      129  205
  • Publication
    Open Access
    First philosophy of democratic capitalism as creative economy: A thomistic onto-theology of self-communicative ownership
    (Journal of Markets & Morality, 2002)
    This paper attempts a theological justification for the right to private property or ownership. This I have subtitled, A Thomistic Onto-Theology of Self-Communicative Ownership, for our discourse grounds human ownership as a participation of the self-giving creativity of the Divine owner. Such a justification of ownership is also a metaphysical articulation of the true spirit of the creative economy, which should be the theological norm for democratic capitalism, insofar as capitalism aspires to be such a creative economy. This is no blind praise of any capitalist system, but proposes itself as a normative thesis as well as a justificatory thesis of capitalism. Hence its title, First Philosophy of Democratic Capitalism As Creative Economy, for it intends to be a demonstration of its first principlesfirst of a creative economy, and by extension also of democratic capitalism insofar as the latter should instantiate such an economy.
      101  204
  • Publication
    Open Access
    What is a school? An answer consistent with human rights
    This essay relates the philosophical and conceptual study of educational institutions with educational policy. I argue that both the descriptive and prescriptive answer to "what a school is" should focus on the school that is important, which is the central case. This central case of a school should embody an ethos of openness towards the basic goods. This translates into rights discourse as a school which respects human rights. From this description I propose policy for evaluating, ranking and developing educational institutions and focused on the merit of philosophy and theology departments in educational institutions.
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