Now showing 1 - 10 of 22
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Learning from the implementers in a design experiment
    (2013) ;
    Dindyal, Jaguthsing
    ;
    In a design experiment, the feedback from the teacher-implementer is crucial to the success of the innovation simply because the teacher is finally the one that brings the innovation to life in front of the students. We describe in this paper the feedback made by the teacher-implementer after teaching one cycle of the problem solving module in a mainstream school, and the modifications the researchers and the teacher-implementer have made in our design of the module to fit into the requirement of the school.
      123  94
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Infusing problem solving into mathematics content course for pre-service secondary school mathematics teachers
    (2013) ;
    Quek, Khiok Seng
    ;
    ; ; ;
    Ho, Foo Him
    ;
    Dindyal, Jaguthsing
    This paper presents a re-design of an undergraduate mathematics content course on Introductory Differential Equations for pre-service secondary school mathematics teachers. Based on the science practical paradigm, mathematics practical lessons emphasizing problem-solving processes via the undergraduate content knowledge were embedded within the curriculum delivered through the traditional lecture-tutorial system. The pre-service teachers' performance in six mathematics practical lessons and the mathematics practical test was examined. They were able to respond to the requirements of the mathematics practical to go through the entire process of problem solving and to carry out "Look Back" at their solution: checking the correctness of their solution, offering alternative solutions, and expanding on the given problem. The use of Mathematics Practical has altered the pre-service teachers’ approach in tackling mathematics problems in a positive direction.
      219  495
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Diffusion of the mathematics practical paradigm in the teaching of problem solving: Theory and praxis
    (2012)
    Quek, Khiok Seng
    ;
    ; ; ;
    Dindyal, Jaguthsing
    In this paper, we discuss the diffusion (of an innovation) and relate it to our attempt to spread our initial design of a mathematics practical paradigm in the teaching of problem solving.
      251  176
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Concretisations: A support for teachers to carry out instructional innovations in the mathematics classroom
    (2019) ; ; ;
    Quek, Khiok Seng
    ;
    Yap, Romina Ann Soon
    We recognize that though teachers may participate in various forms of professional development (PD) programmes, learning that they may have gained in the PD may not always lead to corresponding perceivable changes in their classroom teaching. We offer a theoretical re-orientation towards this issue by introducing a construct we term “concretisation”. Concretisations are resources developed in PD settings which can be converted into tangible tools for classroom use. In theorising such resources, we contribute in informing the design process of teacher professional development for better impact into actual classroom practice. We purport principles of design which render concretisations effective. Subsequently, we test these principles by presenting a specific case of teaching mathematical problem solving.
    WOS© Citations 4Scopus© Citations 4  135  178
  • Publication
    Open Access
      374  193
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Teacher preparation for a problem solving curriculum
    (2009) ; ;
    Quek, Khiok Seng
    ;
    Dindyal, Jaguthsing
    ;
    The role of the teacher is central to the success of any curriculum innovation. Thus, teachers’ professional development has become an increasingly important subject of discussion in recent education literature. In the design and implementation of the project reported here, teachers’ preparation for the problem-solving curriculum featured prominently. This paper discusses the challenges of selecting a suitable problem and ways of using it productively within a professional development programme that the authors carried out for the teachers involved in the project.
      300  166
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Mathematical problem solving for everyone: Infusion and diffusion (MInD)
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ; ; ;
    Quek, Khiok Seng
    ;
    ;
    Dindyal, Jaguthsing
    ;
    Ho, Foo Him
    This research project is an attempt to realise the ideals of mathematical problem solving, which is at the heart of the Singapore mathematics curriculum in the daily practices of mainstream mathematics classrooms. This work builds on the foundation of M-ProSE (OER 32/08 TTL) to diffuse the findings to the mainstream school curriculum. Our work involves three steps: (1) initialisation of problem solving as an essential part of the mathematics curriculum in a school at the foundational year; (2) infusion of problem solving as an embedded regular curricular and pedagogical practice across all year levels in the school, and (3) diffusion of this innovation from this school to the full range of schools in Singapore. In each of the above steps, we take a complex systems approach and include curriculum, instructional practices, assessment and teacher professional development in our overall design research process. Our current project builds upon the initial foundation of MProSE to scale out (infuse) and scale up (diffuse) the innovation to mainstream schools in Singapore, hence the project is named MInD. With the experience and data collected from MProSE research school, the design needs to be re-adjusted in order for problem solving to be diffused throughout the mainstream schools. The importance and relevance of this research project to schools is readily observed by the schools' responses: To the researchers' pleasant surprise, four mainstream schools readily expressed their commitment to participate in this research as the school leaders see the relevance of this project to their school curriculum. Further, the Principal of MProSE research school expressed his interest to get his school involved for the infusion phase(step (2)) of the research. The research team of MInD consists of the original researchers from MProSE and two more new team members. The entire team consists of expertise from different fields: mathematicians, mathematics educator, educational psychologist, curriculum specialist, senior teacher, a school principal (who is also a mathematician), an expert of change management and leadership studies, a senior MOE curriculum specialist.
      120  20
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Teaching undergraduate mathematics: A problem solving course for first year
    In this paper we describe a problem solving course for first year undergraduate mathematics students who would be future school teachers.
      50  81
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    The evolution of mathematics education research in Singapore

    Up until 1990, the Institute of Education in Singapore was primarily a teaching institute involved in training teachers for Singapore schools. Since the inception of the National Institute of Education (NIE) in 1990, as an institute of the Nanyang Technological University, the focus of the institute has been enlarged to include research in education. This chapter examines, through a documentary analysis, how a research culture specifically in mathematics education at the National Institute of Education was nurtured, developed and supported from 1990 onwards. Development of the culture for Mathematics Education Research (MER) has been in tandem with all other areas of research at the NIE. Both top-down and bottom-up approaches have been adopted to support research as part of an academic’s work at the institute. Policies related to recruitment and promotion of academics were developed to ensure that emphasis was on both teaching and research. Development of research, from individually led bite-sized grains to team-based project with coherent themes, was supported. The setting up of the Centre for Research in Pedagogy and Practice in 2004 and dedicated funding from the Ministry of Education Singapore for research of the Singapore education system heralded an era of MER that has made significant contributions both nationally and internationally. This chapter will also illuminate the four main areas of focus and sources on MER through examples of studies carried out in Singapore since 2000. In addition, it briefly outlines the contribution of MER in ASEAN countries.

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