Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10497/11615
Title: 
Authors: 
Keywords: 
Athletes
Maximal oxygen uptake
Scaling
Issue Date: 
Apr-2008
Citation: 
Chia, M., & Abdul Rashid Aziz. (2008). Modelling maximal oxygen uptake in athletes: Allometric scaling versus ratio-scaling in relation to body mass. Annals Academy of Medicine, 37(4), 300-306.
Abstract: 
Maximal oxygen uptake, V02 peak, among athletes is an importantfoundation for all training programmes to enhance competition performance. In Singapore, the \ro2 peak of athletes is apparently not widely known. There is also controversy in the modelling or scaling of maximal oxygen uptake for differences in body size-the use of ratio-scaling remains common
but allometric scaling is gaining acceptance as the method of choice. Materials and Methods: One
hundred fifty-eight male (age, 21.7± 4.9 years; body mass, 64.8± 8.6 kg) and 28 female (age, 21.9
± 7.0 years; body mass, 53.0 ± 7.0 kg) athletes completed a maximal treadmill run to volitional
exhaustion, to determineyo2 peak.~: \ro2 peak in L/min of female athletes was 67.8% that of male athletes (2.53 ± 0.29 vs. 3.73 ± 0.53 L/min), and \ro2 peak in mL/kg BMt.0/min of female athletes was 83.4% of male athletes (48.4 ± 7.2 vs. 58.0 ± 6.9 mL/kg BMt.0/min). Ratioscaling of \ro2 peak did not create a size-free variable and was unsuitable as a scaling method. Instead, \rQ2 peak, that was independent of the effect of body mass in male and female athletes, was best described using2 separate and allometrically-derived sex-specific regression equations; these were \rQ2 peak = 2.23 BM0.670 or male athletes and \ro2 peak = 2.23 BM0.24 for female athletes.
Description: 
Related article: http://hdl.handle.net/10497/11624
ISSN: 
0304-4602
Website: 
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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