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    The use of voice and non-verbal actions to enhance lecture delivery
    (2001)
    Yow, Kin Choong
    We all admire speakers who can casually deliver a humorous, intelligent and well-reasoned talk apparently without effort, and though effortless it may seem, it is actually the culmination of months or even years of hard work and practice. Effective speaking had been made analogous to a good theatre performance: it is not only the voice that makes a good speech, it is also many of the other non-verbal factors like enthusiasm, vitality and sincerity that makes an impression.

    This study aims to look at the various verbal and non-verbal factors that contribute to a good lecture delivery. It is of course important to acknowledge that "delivery" is only one of the many components of a good lecture, the others include 'planning", "assessment", and "feedback.

    Another objective of the study is to evaluate what are the factors that the students think is important in good lecture delivery, and how much of each quantity is considered desirable. With the understanding of the students' expectation of the lecture, and the limitations of what the lecturer can deliver, we can arrive at an optimum situation where effective teaching takes place.

    Our results shows that the students consider aU the verbal and non-verbal factors in this study as important components of a good lecture. However, too much of one thing is never good, and it is the variety in the choice of these factors that will make a lecture a perfect and memorable experience.
      198  31
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    The application of performance for problem-solving in the visual arts
    (2001)
    Noni Kaur
    Perception is the nature of the image. Awareness is perhaps the best term for the content of the act of apprehending. But there exists the word image, which we must come to terms with because even if we could dispense with it when describing the act of perception, we shall need it when we deal with imagination.

    Some psychologists consider the act of percept itself as the most perfect kind of visual image, but it is more usual to regard the image as something divorced from the act or perfection. Memory is the capacity to recall images, in various degrees of vividness; an imagination, is the capacity to relate such images one to another - to make combinations of such images either in the process of thinking, or in the process of feeling. But not everyone has the ability to master such traits. It is especially true in Art education where perception and visualization are primary modes of learning and teaching. It is also an inherent problem whereby 'seeing'and visualizing is becoming more difficult for students with the onslaught of electronic media as images are in 2-D. Visualizing (seeing) is of course important within any artistic activity, and as an Art Educator, I see the need to help students refine and sensitize their feeling.

    The visualizing process is an expression that is relational, meaning that both the conceptual and visual representation of elements are brought together and inter-related in a dynamic way to produce a visual composition.

    To solve the problem of being able to 'see', one way would be to integrate and make changes such as the introduction of performance as a medium and using the body (which is 3 dimensional) as a tool to help students create 2-D artworks. This would then allow them to 'see' a composition and spatial (the concept of space -positive and negative) elements while making Art.

    This paper would investigate the experiential exploration through visualizing a performance. The ultimate result of the research is to develop new ways of 'seeing' Fine Arts for the students and thus create a focus and target for constructive problem-solving.
      195  30
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    Evaluating the impressionistic and substantial changes of creativity : an empirical investigation
    (2001)
    Ng, Aik Kwang
    This study reports the findings of a research project on evaluating the effectiveness of a 20-hour module on creativity which the author facilitated in. This module on creativity was offered to trainee-teachers in the National Institute of Education, who were studying for their Diploma in Education or Postgraduate Diploma in Education. The two main research questions were as follows : First, did the participants find the module to be beneficial for them? Second, did this module result in a substantial change in their conception of creativity? Impressionistic data was needed to answer the first question, while experimental data was needed to answer the second one.

    A short survey was designed to collect these two types of data; it was subsequently administered to two groups of participants who attended the 20-hour module on creativity which the author facilitated in. Analysis of the empirical data indicated that the participants found the module to be beneficial for them. In addition, it was also found that a substantial change occurred in their conception of creativity. Limitations of the study were pointed out, and suggestions for future research were offered. Key learning points of this study were also discussed.
      181  36
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    A preliminary study of transferable skills for electrical and electronic engineers
    (2001)
    Nemai Chandra Karmakar
    The new engineer who is driving the global economy is now being challenged to acquire transferable skills and attributes in addition to technical competency. Transferable skills and attributes include analytical and critical thinking, adequate flexibility, lifelong learning, interpersonal and good communication skills. According to the Stevens Institute of Technology, New Jersey and Aulich's report in Australia, these qualities in professional courses are lacking. This report studies staff perceptions of students' transferable skill acquisition in the School of Electrical and Electronics Engineering at Nanyang Technological University (NTU). Transferable Skills Questionnaire (TSQ) with 21 attributes is based on an instrument used previously at University of Technology, Sydney (UTS). TSQ was distributed to 31 staff who provided data that reveal that staff are confident of their ability to transfer appropriate skills well. The NTU results are compared with the similar results from UTS. The study shows, on the one hand, that NTU staff surveyed are less sensitive to social and industrial contexts and needs and occupational health and safety issues. On the other hand, the strong belief of staff of their success in transferring skills creates some doubt about their over-estimation of their success. The report recommends redesigning the cuniculum and assessment methods to emphasise the acquisition of transferable skills in each subject in every program. This cannot be achieved overnight. Constraints are large class sizes and the existing surface learning culture derived from continual assessment and examinations. Bringing about change in people and organisations to implementation new ideals requires momentum, different attitudes, skill levels, perceptions and vision - in short, a mindset change.
      190  17
  • Publication
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    Encouraging participation in tutorials
    (2001)
    MacAlevey, Niall
      172  21