Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10497/1840
Title: 
Authors: 
Issue Date: 
1989
Citation: 
Teaching and Learning, 9(2),47-53
Abstract: 
This well-known rubric, which precedes many comprehension passages in textbooks, examination papers as well as a host of other
reading materials, has been so over-used that many teachers have taken it as a directive for teaching reading comprehension. This view of comprehension as merely getting students to read the passage
and answer the questions given does not take into consideration the many different facets of the comprehension process. Instead, this
focus on getting the correct answer is product-oriented; this means we are concerned with "What is the answer?" rather than "How did you arrive at this answer?". The latter is a more important question if
we want to understand what thinking process students go through to arrive at their answers. However, the overwhelming concern with the former has resulted in the widespread belief that improvement in
comprehension comes from more practice with answering questions rather than with more effective teaching.
URI: 
ISSN: 
0129-7112
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles - Teaching and Learning

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