Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10497/19497
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dc.contributor.authorHuang, David Junsong-
dc.contributor.authorManu Kapur-
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-11T01:28:52Z-
dc.date.available2018-04-11T01:28:52Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationHuang, J. S., & Manu Kapur. (2015). Can “less” create “more” in analogical reasoning?. Learning: Research and Practice, 1(2), 133-151. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23735082.2015.1071232en
dc.identifier.issn2373-5082-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10497/19497-
dc.descriptionThis is the final draft, after peer-review, of a manuscript published in Learning: Research and Practice. The published version is available online at http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/23735082.2015.1071232-
dc.description.abstractSuccessful analogical reasoning requires an analogue in a source domain to have high degrees of structural and surface similarity with a learning task in a target domain. It also requires learners to have sufficient source- and target-domain knowledge. We review the literature and speculate that “less” might create “more”; in some situations, analogies that have fewer degrees of similarity may be more effective for learning. In this exploratory study, we engaged eight school leaders in dyads to develop a bottom-up perspective on innovation diffusion through analogical reasoning. The qualitative data in the study appears to echo our speculation. The dyads that have less prior target-domain knowledge face challenges with regard to innovation diffusion when they learn with analogues that have more degrees of similarity – both structural and surface. They, however, are able to learn with analogues that have fewer degrees of similarity. Learning was shown to take place when the dyads reflected on an analogue first, before they compared the analogue and innovation diffusion to make any analogical inferences. Although constrained by the exploratory nature of the study, the findings provide preliminary evidence that “less” is possible to create “more” in analogical reasoning under certain conditions, implying an interesting direction for experimental examination in future.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectAnalogical reasoningen
dc.subjectDegrees of similarityen
dc.subjectPrior knowledgeen
dc.subjectDesirable difficultiesen
dc.subjectInstructionen
dc.titleCan “less” create “more” in analogical reasoning?en
dc.typePostprinten
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/23735082.2015.1071232-
local.message.claim2022-10-26T10:49:50.293+0800|||rp00268|||submit_approve|||dc_contributor_author|||None*
item.grantfulltextOpen-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.openairetypePostprint-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.fulltextWith file-
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