Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10497/22202
Title: 
Authors: 
Subjects: 
Maternal mental health
Executive functioning
Preschool, Memory
Event related potentials (ERP)
Issue Date: 
2020
Citation: 
Tan, H. K., Goh, S. K. Y., Tsotsi, S., Bruntraeger, M., Chen, H. Y., Broekman, B., Tan, K. H., Chong, Y. S., Meaney, M. J., Qiu, A., & Rifkin-Graboi, A. (2020). Maternal antenatal anxiety and electrophysiological functioning amongst a sub-set of preschoolers participating in the GUSTO cohort. BMC Psychiatry, 20, Article 62. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12888-020-2454-3
Abstract: 
Background
Antenatal maternal anxiety is a risk for offspring psychological and cognitive difficulties. The preschool years represent an important time for brain development, and so may be a window for intervention. However, electrophysiological investigations of maternal anxiety and preschoolers’ brain functioning are lacking. We ask whether anxiety symptoms predict neurophysiology, and consider timing specificity (26-weeks antenatal or 24-months postnatal), form of insult (anxiety symptoms, per se, or also depression symptoms), and offspring gender.

Methods
The sample consisted of a subset of 71 mothers and their 3 year old children taking part in the prospective birth cohort, GUSTO. Mothers provided antenatal (26 weeks) and postnatal (2 years) anxiety and depressive symptomatology data, respectively via the “State Trait Anxiety Questionnaire” and the “Edinburgh Postpartum Depression Scale.” Offspring provided electrophysiological data, obtained while they indicated the emotional expression of actors whose facial expressions remained consistent throughout a pre-switch block, but were reversed at “post-switch.”

Results
Three electrophysiological components linked to different information processing stages were identified. The two earliest occurring components (i.e., the N1 and P2) differed across blocks. During post-switch, both were significantly predicted by maternal anxiety, after controlling for pre-switch neurophysiology. Similar results were observed with depression. Antenatal mental health remained a significant predictor after controlling for postnatal mental health.

Conclusion
In combination with past work, these findings suggest the importance of reducing symptoms in women prior to and during pregnancy, and offering support to offspring early in development.
URI: 
ISSN: 
1471-244X
DOI: 
Grant ID: 
NMRC/TCR/004-NUS/2008
NMRC/TCR/012-NUHS/2014
Biomedical Research Council (BMRC) Strategic Positioning Fund (SPF) (Grant no. SPF2013/002)
NMRC/CBRG/0039/2013
Young Investigator Award at the Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences (Grant no. SICS/YIG/2013/002)
Funding Agency: 
Singapore National Research Foundation
Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences
Agency for Science Technology and Research (A*STAR)
File Permission: 
Open
File Availability: 
With file
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