Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10497/22209
Title: 
Authors: 
Subjects: 
Commitment in science learning
Conceptions of science learning
Science academic hardiness
Science learning self-efficacy
Issue Date: 
2020
Citation: 
Tan, A.–L., Liang, J.–C., & Tsai, C.–C. (2020). Relationship among high school students’ science academic hardiness, conceptions of learning science and science learning self-efficacy in Singapore. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 19, 313-332. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10763-019-10040-1
Abstract: 
This study used three previously validated instruments, namely Science Academic Hardiness (SAH), Students’ Conceptions of Learning Science (COLS) and Science Learning Self-Efficacy (SLSE) on 431 Singaporean students. Using structural equation modeling, results showed that the SAH commitment dimension a positive predictor explaining both the reproductive (e.g. science learning as memorizing or testing) and constructivist (e.g. science learning as understanding or seeing in a new way) conceptions of science learning as well as all dimensions of students’ self-efficacy among high school students. It was also found that the SAH control dimension is a positive predictor for explaining the SLSE science communication dimension but is a negative predictor for explaining reproductive COLS. Finally, only students with constructivist COLS had significant associations with all SLSE dimensions. These findings suggest that students’ personal commitment to learning science is an important aspect to cultivate since it has the ability to predict conceptions of science learning and self-efficacy. Further, creating opportunities for students to be engaged in learning through constructivist ways—such as designing tasks to help students understand and see phenomena in new ways and occasions for students to apply their science knowledge to solve science problems—is likely to lead to positive self-efficacy in practical science work, science communication, and everyday applications of scientific knowledge. Additionally, students’ engagement in reproductive ways of learning science—such as memorization, testing, and calculating and practicing—could be reduced since these do not contribute to building students’ science learning self-efficacy.
Description: 
This is the final draft, after peer-review, of a manuscript published in International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education. The published version is available online at https://doi.org/10.1007/s10763-019-10040-1
URI: 
ISSN: 
1571-0068 (print)
1573-1774 (online)
DOI: 
File Permission: 
Open
File Availability: 
With file
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