Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10497/22574
Title: 
Authors: 
Supervisor: 
Nie, Youyan
Issue Date: 
2020
Abstract: 
Does prior success always breed future success? Are our future achievements always predicted by we achieve in the past? This dissertation presents a research which aimed to investigate the relationship between prior academic achievement and subsequent academic achievement and the roles self-regulated learning, goal orientation and feedback played in this relationship. To undertake this investigation, three separate but related empirical studies were carried out involving a total of 472 junior college Economics students and five Economics teachers.

Study 1 developed and validated the Self-Regulated Learning Achievement Goal (SRLAG) Scale for the purpose of measuring self-regulated learning and goal orientation more comprehensively and as a result of formative assessment approaches. A sample of 308 students were split by their level of Economics (H1 and H2) taken at the A-levels into two sub-samples, Sample 1 (N = 152) and Sample 2 (N = 156). Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted with Sample 1 to determine the number of factors and select the items. Sample 2 was evaluated with Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) for the re-confirmation of the factorial structure and the inspection of model-data fit. The outcomes from both analyses supported the eight-factor SRLAG scale with a total of 27 items. Each sub-scale of the SRLAG scale showed good internal consistency and construct validity.

Study 2 examined the relationship between prior and subsequent academic achievement to pin down the precise factors that explained why prior academic achievement predicted subsequent academic achievement. It conjectured that self-regulated learning and goal orientation were the determinants of this relationship. Through multiple regression, results indicated that self-regulated learning and goal orientation, in terms of planning, self-reflection, self-efficacy, performance-avoidance and mastery goal orientation, partially mediated the relationship between prior academic achievement and subsequent academic performance in economics. This not only partially informed why prior academic achievement predicted subsequent academic achievement but also what to target to influence this relationship.

Study 3 was a quasi-experimental research to study the impact of three different formative assessment approaches on self-regulated learning and goal orientation. It utilised a pretest and posttest within-subject design to identify which of the three formative assessment approach generated the greatest positive change in self-regulated learning skills and the acquisition of mastery goal, given that these were found to be partial mediators in the relationship between prior academic achievement and subsequent academic performance in Study 2. Not surprisingly, results indicated that when the formative assessment approach resembled most closely the three phases of self-regulated learning theory, the increase in self-regulated learning in terms of planning, self-reflection, effort and self-efficacy was the greatest. On the other hand, when the formative assessment approach did not model after the three phases of self-regulated learning theory, there was a significant rise in endorsement of performance-avoidance and performance-approach goals.

On the whole, this research through Study 2, confirmed that self-regulated learning and mastery goal indeed predicted academic achievement. Study 3 then tested and identified the specific formative assessment approaches that could strengthen self-regulated learning skills and promote mastery goal orientation. Study 1 provided teachers a viable and reliable instrument for measuring the impact of these formative assessment strategies on self-regulated learning and goal orientation. Taken together, this research could contribute significantly to the theory, research and practice of self-regulation, goal orientation and formative assessment.
URI: 
Issued Date: 
2020
Call Number: 
LB1062.6 Tan
File Permission: 
Restricted
File Availability: 
With file
Appears in Collections:Doctor in Education (Ed.D.)

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
TanDaiHwee-EDD.pdf
  Restricted Access
8.57 MBAdobe PDFView/Open
Show full item record

Page view(s) 10

242
checked on Nov 24, 2022

Download(s) 50

83
checked on Nov 24, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.