Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10497/22805
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dc.contributor.authorPan, Jing Wenen
dc.contributor.authorKomar, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorKong, Pui Wahen
dc.date.accessioned2021-03-23T06:44:27Z-
dc.date.available2021-03-23T06:44:27Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationPan, J. W., Komar, J., & Kong, P. W. (2021). Development of new 9-ball test protocols for assessing expertise in cue sports. BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, 13, Article 9. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13102-021-00237-9en
dc.identifier.issn2052-1847-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10497/22805-
dc.descriptionThis is the final draft, after peer-review, of a manuscript published in BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation. The published version is available online at https://doi.org/10.1186/s13102-021-00237-9en
dc.description.abstractBackground This study aimed to develop new test protocols for evaluating 9-ball expertise levels in cue sports players. Methods Thirty-one male 9-ball players at different playing levels were recruited (recreational group, n = 8; university team, n = 15; national team, n = 8). A 15-ball test was administered to indicate overall performance by counting the number of balls potted. Five skill tests (power control, cue alignment, angle, back spin, and top spin) were conducted to evaluate specific techniques by calculating error distances from pre-set targets using 2D video analysis. Results Intra-class correlation analyses revealed excellent intra-rater and inter-rater reliability in four out of five skill tests (ICC > 0.95). Significant between-group differences were found in 15-ball test performance (p <  0.001) and absolute error distances in the angle (p <  0.001), back spin (p = 0.006), and top spin tests (p = 0.045), with the recreational group performing worst while the national team performing best. Greater inter-trial variability was observed in recreational players than the more skilled players (p <  0.005). Conclusions In conclusion, the 9-ball test protocols were reliable and could successfully discriminate between different playing levels. Coaches and researchers may employ these protocols to identify errors, monitor training, and rank players.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectErroren
dc.subjectVariabilityen
dc.subjectKinoveaen
dc.subjectPlaying levelen
dc.subjectPoolen
dc.subjectBilliardsen
dc.titleDevelopment of new 9-ball test protocols for assessing expertise in cue sportsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.projectSUG 12/18 KPW-
dc.relation.datasethttps://doi.org/10.25340/R4/ARYSBT-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13102-021-00237-9-
dc.grant.idOffice of Education Research Start-up Granten
dc.grant.fundingagencyMinistry of Education, Singaporeen
dc.grant.fundingagencyChina Scholarship Council (CSC)-
local.message.claim2021-12-21T17:43:14.724+0800|||rp00008|||submit_approve|||dc_contributor_author|||None*
local.message.claim2021-12-27T10:52:21.313+0800|||rp00009|||submit_approve|||dc_contributor_author|||None*
item.openairetypeArticle-
item.fulltextWith file-
item.cerifentitytypePublications-
item.openairecristypehttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_18cf-
item.languageiso639-1en-
item.grantfulltextOpen-
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