Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10497/22867
Title: 
Authors: 
Subjects: 
Daoism
Nothing/ness
Music education
Chinese philosophy
Issue Date: 
2021
Citation: 
Lu, M., & Tan, L. (2021). On the usefulness of nothingness: A Daoist-inspired philosophy of music education. Philosophy of Music Education Review, 29(1), 88-101. https://www.muse.jhu.edu/article/786580
Abstract: 
In 1952, John Cage wrote 4′33″ which famously asked the performer not to play a single note: tacet. This provocative work raises a number of questions. In music—and by extension, music education—what does it mean to not do something? What does it mean to make no sound? More fundamentally, what is the nature of non-action, non-sound, and even nothingness in and of itself? Since Cage was influenced by Eastern philosophy, we journey to Asia in search of insights into nothingness and associated notions of absence and negation. In particular, we draw on the writings of Daoist philosophers, principally Laozi, to examine a quartet of philosophical terms, namely, wu (nothing/ness), wuwei (non-action), wusheng (non-sound), and wuaile (neither sorrow nor joy). Using these ideas, we propose a Daoist-inspired philosophy of music education, one that emphasizes the usefulness (yong) of nothingness (wu).
Description: 
This is the final draft, after peer-review, of a manuscript published in Philosophy of Music Education Review. The published version is available online at https://www.muse.jhu.edu/article/786580
URI: 
ISSN: 
1063-5734 (print)
1543-3412 (online)
File Permission: 
Open
File Availability: 
With file
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