Now showing 1 - 10 of 20
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Effectiveness of modified perceived exertion scale on exercise intensity across age group, gender and exercise modalities
    (Elsevier, 2023) ;
    Boey, Peggy
    ;
    Ng, Yew Cheo

    This study aims to conduct a systematic and meta-analysis to collate the current findings and assess the effectiveness of perceived exertion scales (original or modified), across various users profile (gender, age, exercise background) and exercise modalities (aerobic vs resistance).

      11
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Obesity prevention in Singapore: Collaborative efforts among government, health professionals and the community
    (2010)
    Nidhi Gupta
    ;
    Chin, Ming-Kai
    ;
    Yang, Jingzhen
    ;
    ; ;
    Girandola, Robert N.
    ;
    Edginton, Christopher R.
    ;
    Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching
    Obesity has reached global epidemic proportions over the past 10 years. As countries become more affluent, their populations tend to adopt caloric balance problems that have plagued the USA and Western Europe. Obesity is classified as the second most serious reversible health problem, after smoking in the world today. The relationship between obesity and cardiovascular diseases is well documented. The increase in obesity in Asian countries is remarkable. In 2004, the prevalence of obesity in the adult population in Singapore increased upto 16% (high risk category: ≥ 27.5kg/m2) and prompted many forms of government action, encouraging collaboration between businesses, the educational system and non-governmental organizations. This paper reviews the rise of obesity in Singapore and some of the approaches being implemented to address this concern. Singapore, a multiethnic country, with Chinese, Indian and Malay populations, has to address diversity in customs, diet and religions to combat obesity. The collaborative efforts of various organizations such as the Ministry of Health (MOH), Ministry of Education (MOE) and the Health Promotion Board (HPB) have successfully improved the health status of Singaporeans. The fact that the rise in obesity in Singapore is lower than in other neighboring Asian countries attests to the partial success of the collaborative efforts.
      2762  17781
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Motion sensor outputs of children and adolescents walking and running to three treadmill speeds
    (University of Travnik, 2009) ;
    Wong, Patricia
    ;
    ;
    Tan, Swee Kheng
    ;
    Kunalan, C. (Canagasabai)
    ;
    Chiang, Jasson
    The study examined the motion sensor outputs of Singaporean children and adolescents of both sexes to walking and running on a motorized treadmill (Quinton Series 90) under controlled laboratory conditions. 58 youths of normal body mass (N=58, age: 13.2±3.0 y; height: 1.53±0.02 m; body mass: 45.5±14.2 kg; BMI: 18.8± 3.0 kg/m2; Tanner rating: 2.5±1.3) were recruited for the study. Accelerometer (ActiGraph GT 1 M) activity (ActiCounts in counts/min) and step rate (ActiSteps in steps/min) and pedometer (Omron HJ 005-E) step rate (PedoSteps in steps/min), oxygen uptake (in ml/kg/min) and heart rate (in bpm) were obtained from 5-minutes stages of 0 % gradient of treadmill walking at 4 km/hr and running at 6 km/hr and 8 km/hr. Walking at 4 km/hr was estimated at 4.0-6.0 METs, whilst running at 6 km/hr and 8 km/hr was estimated at 6.3-8.6 and 10.0-11.4 METs, respectively. Motion sensor outputs increased significantly with treadmill speeds (76-101 % for ActiCounts; 22-24 % for ActiSteps and18-25 % for PedoSteps, all p<0.01) as did oxygen uptake (48-55 %) and heart rate (27-28 %) but there was no sex difference in activity or step rate or physiological responses (p>0.01). No meaningful relationships were obtained between accelerometer activity rate and oxygen uptake or heart rate. There was acceptable agreement between accelerometer and pedometer step rate for the walking and running on the treadmill but the difference between accelerometer and pedometer step rate was smallest at a treadmill running speed of 6 km/hr. These results show that accelerometer and pedometer step rates are useful and suitable measurements of physical activity involving walking and running among Singaporean children and adolescents of normal body mass. Further investigations are necessary to fully exploit the use of accelerometer data in physical activity research among young people.
      405  232
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Comparing the effects of plyometric and isometric strength training on dynamic and isometric force-time characteristics
    (2022)
    Lum, Danny Wan Yin
    ;
    Comfort, Paul
    ;
    Barbosa, Tiago M.
    ;
    The purpose of the study was to compare the change in dynamic and isometric force-time characteristics after plyometric (PLYO) or isometric strength training (ISO). Twenty-two endurance runners (age = 37 ± 6 years,stature = 1.71 ± 0.05 m, body mass = 62.7 ± 8.6 kg, weekly mileage = 47.3 ± 10.8 km) performed a countermovement jump (CMJ) and isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP) test during pre- and post-tests. They were then randomly assigned to either PLYO or ISO group and completed 12 sessions of intervention over six weeks. The PLYO included drop jump, single leg bounding and split jump, and the ISO included IMTP and isometric ankle plantar flexion. Significant and large time x group interactions were observed for CMJ countermovement depth (P = 0.037, ƞ²p = 0.21) and IMTP and relative peak force (PF) (P = 0.030, ƞ²p = 0.22). Significant and large main effects for time were observed in CMJ height, peak power, propulsive phase duration, countermovement depth, reactive strength index modified, IMTP PF and relative PF (P < 0.05, 0.20 ≤ ƞ²p ≤ 0.65). Effect for time showed small improvement in CMJ height for both PLYO (P < 0.001, d = 0.48) and ISO (P = 0.009, d = 0.47), small improvement in CMJ PP in PLYO (P = 0.020, d = 0.21), large increase in countermovement depth (P = 0.004, d = 1.02) and IMTP relative PF (P < 0.001, d = 0.87), and moderate increase in propulsive phase duration (P = 0.038, d = 0.65) and IMTP PF (P < 0.001, d = 0.55) in ISO. There were large differences between groups for percentage change in countermovement depth (P = 0.003, d = 0.96) and IMTP relative PF (P = 0.047, d = 0.90). In conclusion, both PLYO and ISO improved CMJ jump height via different mechanisms, while only ISO resulted in improved IMTP PF and relative PF.
    WOS© Citations 6  51
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    A normalized rate of perceived exertion at ventilatory breakpoint for different exercise modalities and production of exercise intensity with self-regulation for Singapore children
    (2022) ;
    Thor, Dianna
    ;
    Ng, Yew Cheo
    ;
    Boey, Peggy Peck Kay
    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to identify a normalized RPE response at ventilatory breakpoint (Vpt) for male adolescents 13-17 years old, and whether these adolescents could self-regulate at target RPEs of 4 and 6.
    METHODS: Twenty healthy males participated in the study, with 10 males in each of the cycling and walking/running groups. Participants performed orientation and V̇O2peak trials before performing a perceptual estimation exercise trial to obtain RPE Vpt, and two production trials to assess self-regulation ability.
    RESULTS: Vpt corresponded to 67.7% V̇O2peak for the cycling group and 70.4% V̇O2peak for the walking/running group. There were no group differences on RPE-Overall Vpt (cycling: 4.6; walking/running: 4.4), RPE-Legs Vpt (cycling: 5.4; walking/running: 4.6), and RPE-Chest Vpt (cycling: 4.0; walking/running: 4.8). A normalized RPE-Overall Vpt response was identified at five. V̇O2 did not differ between the estimation and production trials at targets RPE of 4 (1.59 vs. 1.57 L·min-1) and 6 (1.87 vs. 1.79 L·min-1). Similarly, heart rate (HR) did not differ between estimation and production trials at targets RPE 4 (152.4 vs. 151.1 beats·min-1) and 6 (167.1 vs. 162.4 beats·min-1). Both V̇O2 and HR were significantly higher at RPE 6 compared to RPE 4. Responses were not affected by exercise mode or production sequence.
    CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that undifferentiated and differentiated RPE Vpt were similar between cycling and walking/running participants. Male adolescents between 13- and 17-year-olds were able to use the OMNI scale to self-regulate exercise intensities that would be useful in field settings.
      38
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Effectiveness of modified perceived exertion scale on exercise intensity across age group, gender and exercise modalities
    (2024) ;
    Boey, Peggy
    ;
    Ng, Yew Cheo

    This study aims to conduct a systematic and meta-analysis to collate the current findings and assess the effectiveness of perceived exertion scales (original or modified), across various users profile (gender, age, exercise background) and exercise modalities (aerobic vs resistance).

      11
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Sprint kayaking performance enhancement by isometric strength training inclusion: A randomized controlled trial
    (2021)
    Lum, Danny Wan Yin
    ;
    Barbosa, Tiago M.
    ;
    Performing isometric strength training (IST) can enhance various sports performance. This study compared the effects of including IST on sprint kayaking performance as compared to traditional strength training. Twenty sprint kayaking athletes (age 22 ± 4 year, stature 1.71 ± 0.09 m, body mass 72.0 ± 11.4 kg) performed a 200-m kayak ergometer time trial (200mTT), isometric squat (IsoSqT), isometric bench press (IsoPress) and isometric prone bench pull (IsoPull) during the pre- and post-tests. Athletes were randomly assigned to either traditional strength training (TRAD) or IST group. Both groups performed a similar strength training program twice a week for six weeks. However, half the volume for squat, bench press and prone bench pull were replaced by IsoSqT, IsoPress and IsoPull, respectively, for the IST group. IsoSqT was performed at 90° knee angle, while IsoPress and IsoPull were performed at 90° and 120° elbow angles, respectively. Each isometric contraction was performed with maximum intensity and sustained for three seconds. A significant main time effect was observed for 200mTT (p < 0.001, ƞ2p = 0.68) and all isometric strength measures (p = 0.001–0.032, ƞ2p = 0.24–0.76) except rate of force development at 0–90 ms (RFD90) obtained from IsoSqT120 and IsoPress90. A group main effect was observed in RFD90 obtained from IsoSqT120 and IsoPull120 (p = 0.003–0.004, ƞ2p = 0.37–0.39). Time x Group interaction was observed for 200mTT (p = 0.027, ƞ2p = 0.68), peak force obtained from IsoSqT90, IsoPress90, and IsoPull120 (p = 0.004–0.006, ƞ2p = 0.36–0.38) and RFD90 obtained from IsoSqT120 and IsoPull120 (p = 0.012–0.015, ƞ2p = 0.28–0.30). Inclusion of IST resulted in greater improvement for sprint kayaking and strength performances then TRAD alone.
    WOS© Citations 8Scopus© Citations 10  74  89
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Running Energy Reserve Index (RERI) as a new model for assessment and prediction of world, elite, sub-elite, and collegiate running performances
    (2023) ;
    Loh, Mun Keong
    ;
    Boey, Peggy Peck Kay
    ;
    Ng, Yew Cheo
    The purpose of this study was to utilize the Running Energy Reserve Index (RERI) model and two-trial procedure to predict all-out athletic performances. Twenty-nine trained athletes tested for differences between RERIE and RERIspd (hypothesis 1). Six sprint trained (ST), six middle distance (MD), and six endurance trained (ET) athletes were selected to test for differences in the value of the constant. The prediction of all-out run performances using the RERI model (hypothesis 2) and two treadmill trials procedure (hypothesis 3) were tested on eighteen trained athletes. Lastly, three trained athletes were utilized to predict all-out running performances utilizing two track trials equation (hypothesis 3). RERIE and RERIspd were significantly different between ST, MD, and ET athletes. The RERIE model with a fixed cE value of 0.0185 s−1 predicted all-out running performances to within an average of 2.39 ± 2.04% (R2 = 0.99, nT = 252) for all athletes, with treadmill trials to within an average of 2.26 ± 1.89% (R2 = 0.99, nT = 203) and track trials to within an average of 2.95 ± 2.51% (R2 = 0.99, nT = 49). The two trials equations predicted all-out track performances to within errors of 2.43%. The RERI model may be accurate in determining running performances of 200 m and 5000 m, and treadmill performances ranging between 5 and 1340 s with a high level of accuracy. In addition, the two-trial procedure can be used to determine short and middle distance running performances of athletes and world-class runners.
    WOS© Citations 1Scopus© Citations 1  52  59
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Effects of isometric strength and plyometric training on running performance: A randomized controlled study
    (2022)
    Lum, Danny Wan Yin
    ;
    Barbosa, Tiago M.
    ;
    Abdul Rashid Aziz
    ;
    Purpose: The aim of the study was to compare the effects of isometric strength (IST) and plyometric training (PT) on endurance running performance. Methods: Twenty-six endurance runners (18 males and 8 females; age 36 ± 6 years, stature 1.69 ± 0.05 m body mass 61.6 ± 8.0 kg, VO2max 50.4 ± 5.8 ml·kg−1·min−1) completed the countermovement jump (CMJ), isometric mid-thigh pull (IMTP), 2.4 km run time trial (2.4kmTT), running economy test (RE) and a graded exercise test measures at baseline. They were then randomly assigned to three groups, the control (CON), PT or IST group, and completed the circuit, plyometric or isometric training, respectively, twice a week for 6 weeks, while still continuing to perform their planned running training. They then completed the same set of measures performed at baseline post-intervention. Results: Significant time x group interactions and time main effect were observed for 2.4kmTT (P = .002, ƞ2p = .45 and P < .001, ƞ2 =0.72), maximal aerobic speed (MAS) (P = .006, ƞ2p = .39), CMJ height (P < .001, ƞ2p = .55) and IMTP relative peak force (P = .001, ƞ2p = .50) in favor of PT and IST. Significant main effect for time was observed for 2.4kmTT (P < .001, ƞ2p = .72), RE (P = .048, ƞ2p = .17), VO2max (P = .047, ƞ2p = .18), MAS (P < .001, ƞ2p = .63), CMJ height (P < .001, ƞ2p = .51) and IMTP relative peak force (P < .001, ƞ2p = .58). Conclusion: In conclusion, both PT and IST were similarly effective at enhancing running endurance performance. However, IST resulted in greater improvement to RE.
    WOS© Citations 7Scopus© Citations 12  141
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Brain Breaks® physical activity solutions in the classroom and on attitudes toward physical activity: A randomized controlled trial among primary students from eight countries
    (2020)
    Mok, Magdalena Mo Ching
    ;
    Chin, Ming-Kai
    ;
    Korcz, Agata
    ;
    Popeska, Biljana
    ;
    Edginton, Christopher R.
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    Uzunoz, Fatma Sacli
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    Podnar, Hrvoje
    ;
    Coetzee, Dané
    ;
    Georgescu, Luminita
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    Emeljanovas, Arunas
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    Pasic, Milan
    ;
    ;
    Anderson, Elizabeth
    ;
    Durstine, J. Larry
    Classroom-based physical activity (PA) interventions have received considerable attention due to improvements seen in academic achievement, classroom behaviors, and attitude toward PA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the Brain Breaks® Physical Activity Solutions in changing children’s attitudes toward PA. Students (N = 3036) aged 8–11 years from schools in Croatia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Poland, Romania, Serbia, South Africa, and Turkey were randomly assigned to either a control or an experimental group. The experimental group received Brain Breaks® videos during classroom sessions throughout the four months of intervention. Student attitudes toward PA were measured using the Attitudes toward Physical Activity Scale (APAS) before and after the intervention. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a time interaction effect for all APAS variables except fitness. Time-by-group interaction effects with different effect sizes were found for most APAS variables, with the greatest gain effect noted in the experimental group for self-efficacy, followed by learning from the videos concerning PA benefits, exercise importance, and enjoyment from engaging in PA. This study provides evidence supporting Brain Breaks® in terms of learning experience, attitudes towards PA, and personal motivation. Using exercise videos is recommended as an interactive, technology-based PA solution that can be easily integrated into the school setting.
    WOS© Citations 24Scopus© Citations 31  133  105