Now showing 1 - 10 of 30
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Holistic design of a mobile peer tutoring application based on learning and user needs analysis
    (2020) ;
    Chung, Sheng-Hung
    ;
    ;
    Looi, Chee-Kit
    ;
    Wong, Wai Hoe
    Research has shown that peer tutoring at the university level could improve students’ performance and, enhance their motivation and learning, increase self-determination and learner autonomy, and reinforce conceptual knowledge by providing opportunities for reapplication of concepts. This paper describes the development of a mobile peer tutoring application – Mobile Education Networked Tutoring On Request (MENTOR). We start with a review of the literature to identify the relevant affordances that this mobile app should possess. In addition, questionnaires were administered with students studying in higher education to understand the needs of peer tutoring with tutors and tutees. The findings of the survey data showed that a majority of the students are receptive to peer tutoring and found it to be a user-friendly and intuitive method of mobile peer tutoring. One feature of MENTOR is the tutor-tutee matching – tutees are individually paired with tutors by using predictive modeling based on student data. Tutor-tutee matching can be efficiently accomplished via MENTOR mobile application by granting tutees the choice of tutors based on mutual tutor-tutee availabilities, students' background and tutor ratings. The other main features of the mobile peer tutoring application, such as online peer tutoring are presented in this study. The study contributes to the application of learning sciences and learning technologies to provide a holistic design for supporting student peer tutoring at the university level.
      77  156
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Exploring first-year undergraduates’ difficulties in writing the discussion section of a research paper: A Singapore study
    Much of academic writing research is conducted with academics and postgraduate students in the United States, Hong Kong, and Saudi Arabia. There is less published research on how undergraduate students reflect on their writing activities in Singapore. Little is known about what challenges these students face in writing academic papers, in particular, the discussion of results of their first academic paper written in their first year of study. The present study fills this gap by investigating Singaporean undergraduates to uncover their perception of difficulties in writing their first research papers in a compulsory academic writing course offered by a teacher training institute. In-depth interviews were conducted to the four undergraduate students. Results found that, with regard to undergraduates‟ perceptions of writing the discussions section, the main problems were selection of content, organization of content, demonstration of appropriate stance, grammar, and choice of words. Additionally, based on the instructor‟s comments on the students‟ term papers, results revealed that there were mismatches between the writing instructor‟s professional understanding and students‟ understanding of their own difficulties. The findings of this study have pedagogical implications pertaining to ways to improve the teaching of undergraduate student teachers‟ discussion of results not only in Singapore, but also in similar contexts outside Asia.
      263  480
  • Publication
    Open Access
      113  147
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Socio-cognitive approach to teaching writing: Impact on pupils' compositions
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ; ;
    Most of the existing studies on academic writing were conducted in ESL/EFL university settings. Further research targeted at other educational settings such as primary schools, which are quite different from the university settings previously studied, for students in different stages of their studies, will advance our understanding of student writing broadly. In 2016, the Journal of Second Language Writing will devote an entire issue to English language writing in elementary classrooms across contexts, calling for studies to address the difficulties that young students face in their learning, as well as the kind of support they do or should receive during classes. Therefore, research that investigates how English language writing is taught in primary school classrooms, outside of EFL/ESL contexts, is of much current interest, but sufficient existing knowledge is still lacking. The present study will fill this research gap identified. A further rationale for understanding the teaching of English language writing at the primary school level is that existing studies in Singapore do not explicate the effect of explicit writing instruction on primary school students in genres other than argumentative essays. To the best of our knowledge, there have been only two studies (Koh, 2002; Neo, 2004) that yielded empirical data on the English language writing of primary school children in Singapore. The proposed research will contribute to addressing these observations raised specifically for the weaker learners. A starting point of the proposed research is to analyse and document how primary English language teachers in Singapore teach writing in traditional writing classes. In particular, we seek to understand how different genres of writing are taught in English language writing classes in a Singapore primary school. Extensive classroom observation data will be collected to support this analysis. Another goal of the proposed research is to design and implement a writing programme based on a socio-cognitive approach. We will test the advantages of this approach relative to the traditional teaching methods, by identifying and understanding how it may impact the quality of writing produced by underachievers in the primary school. Based on the classroom observation data collected about the traditional teaching methods, we will design and implement writing tasks for the intervention programme that are relevant to the students' lives and socio-cultural environment. The results will yield findings that are likely generalizable across English language writing classrooms, thereby helping students who are struggling generally with the learning of writing and compositions.
      132  17
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Mobile MENTOR (Mobile Education Networked Tutoring On Request)
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2021) ;
    Chung, Sheng-Hung
    ;
    Wong, Wai Hoe
    ;
    ;
    Looi, Chee-Kit
      190  103
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Perceptions of fourth grade students on technology enabled self-directed learning and collaborative learning activities in English writing lessons in Singapore
    The purpose of this study is to explore and compare fourth grade students’ perceptions of technology enabled self-directed learning and collaborative learning during their five-week English writing lesson. Three elementary schools in Singapore were invited to participate in the study. In this pseudo-experimental study, students in the intervention group were able to use various technology tools to develop their self-directed learning and collaborative learning skills while working on their writing tasks. At the end of the intervention, their perceptions of self-directed learning and collaborate learning with technology were collected and compared with the control group. There were significant differences in the perceptions between the control and the experimental groups.
      64
  • Publication
    Open Access
      115  132
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Written corrective feedback in writing instruction: A qualitative synthesis of recent research
    (2017)
    Sia, Pei Fen Dawn
    ;
    Giving written feedback to students is an important part of writing instruction. However, few studies have been conducted to investigate current trends of written corrective feedback in the secondary and university contexts. To identify and evaluate the current state of empirical evidence, we conducted a qualitative synthesis of published research that examined written corrective feedback in both English-as-the-first-language and English-as-the second/foreign-language settings. Four claims emerged in our analyses of 68 empirical studies published in journals from 2006-2016. Each claim is supported by empirical evidence. The claims are: (1) Individual differences play a part in the effectiveness of written corrective feedback; (2) Students’ and teachers’ perceptions affect the effectiveness of written corrective feedback; (3) Giving corrective feedback through technology is beneficial to students; and (4) Written corrective feedback is more effective when it is used concurrently with collaborative tasks. This meta-synthesis study sheds light on the written corrective practice of English Language teachers across different pedagogical settings and the factors that may affect student engagement in teacher written feedback.
      426  1873