Now showing 1 - 10 of 17
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    Open Access
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    Reconstructing differences in lesson study: Shaping teachers’ beliefs about teaching culturally diverse students in Singapore
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ;
    Lee, Christine Kim-eng
    ;
    The urgency of teaching diverse learners is aptly demonstrated in many parts of the world as the ethnic, racial, class, and linguistic diversity grows rapidly. Such diversity not only brings about opportunities for creative teaching, but also challenges for ensuring educational equity and providing high-quality teaching for all students from diverse backgrounds, especially those presently underserved by the educational system (Buehl, & Beck, 2014; Civitillo, Juang, & Schachner, 2018). Researchers have found that teachers prepared for working with students from diverse cultural backgrounds need to embrace beliefs that recognize the strengths of cultural diversity (Anagnostopoulos, 2006; Banks et al., 2005; Fives & Buehl, 2014; Gay, 2010). Thus, exploring and challenging teachers’ beliefs about cultural diversity should constitute a major objective in teacher professional learning. However, only a few studies have examined how in-service teachers’ beliefs are enacted and shaped in professional learning community practices (Little, 2003; Tam, 2015; Turner, 2011), and focused even less on teachers’ beliefs about cultural diversity (Pang, 2005; Sleeter, 1992). There are a few studies examining teachers’ cultural beliefs about diversity in Singapore, and found that Singaporean teachers are influenced by prevailing political ideologies, and have ambiguous perceptions towards students from less advantaged backgrounds (Anderson, 2015; Alviar-Martin & Ho, 2011; Dixon & Liang, 2009; Ho & Alviar-Martin, 2010; Ho et al., 2014; Lim & Tan, 2018). However, these studies discussed teachers’ individual perceptions of disadvantaged learners without further exploring how these perceptions are mediated by influences from professional development practices, where teachers’ cultural beliefs about diversity issues are in (inter)action as ideas emerge, clash, change, and (dis)agree with each other when teachers work together.
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  • Publication
    Open Access
    Use of comics in teaching mathematics
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2018) ; ; ;
      137  262
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Learning to teach low-SES (socioeconomic status) pupils through assessment in China
    (2012-04)
    This case study describes for one rural school in China how pre-service teachers perceived their rural students and how they learned to focus on the test-related activities through the collaborative work with their intern colleagues and mentors. As this study explains, pre-service teachers learned from their mentors and support each other in learning to teach. I find that such professional collaboration sometimes promote teachers learning how to work with lower achieving students more effectively and offer them more cognitively demanding knowledge. This is referred to as “teaching through assessment”. Yet, some pre-service teachers in this study support each other in becoming more skilled in “teaching for assessment”, as well as in explicitly distinguishing between higher achieving and lower achieving students.
      191  130
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Teacher learning with classroom assessment in Singapore primary schools
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2022) ;
    Tan, Liang See
    ;
    Lam, Karen
    ;
    Chia, Terence Titus Song An
    ;
    Malathy Krishnasamy
    ;
    Ria George
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  • Publication
    Open Access
    Introduction
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  • Publication
    Open Access
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  • Publication
    Open Access
    Lost in adaptation? Issues of adapting Japanese lesson study in non-Japanese contexts
    (2019) ;
    Lee, Christine Kim-eng
    ;
    ;
    Akhila Sudarshan
    The phenomenal spread of Japanese lesson study (LS) beyond Japan is indicative of the perception that the seemingly obvious routines of LS are transferable into foreign contexts. It is, however, to be expected, that various aspects of LS would be adapted to suit the culture of the adopting context. The diverse ways in which LS is adapted across different contexts provides the opportunity for researchers to unpack what needs to be done to better adapt, implement and sustain LS to support teacher development across non-Japanese contexts. This paper is based on the findings from a nation-wide research project undertaken to explore the adaptations made to LS in Singapore schools. Surveys and case studies provided data to examine LS structure and implementation processes in Singapore schools and to investigate school leaders’ and teachers’ experiences and understandings of LS processes. In teasing out the subtle differences among the Singaporean adaptations and Japanese LS, we gleaned a deeper understanding of the cultural and contextual factors that elucidate key features of LS that are pertinent in creating the necessary conditions for effective teacher learning.
    WOS© Citations 12Scopus© Citations 14  111  190
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Boundary actions for collaborative learning: A practical perspective of adapting lesson study in a Singapore primary school
    (2022) ; ;
    Lee, Christine Kim-eng
    This qualitative study seeks to establish a deeper understanding of how and what teachers and teacher educators learn collaboratively during the lesson study process in a Singapore primary school. We used the boundary theories to conceptualize this learning process and delineate the learning mechanisms to foster mutual learning between the teacher educators and teachers in the case school. It was found that the teachers’ practical concerns and the improvement proposals from the teacher educators were constantly being negotiated considering the perceived and received consequences, which drove the boundary actions that include both boundary making and boundary crossing to form a learning space for the participants. Findings from this study provide a practical perspective that explains the complexities, challenges, and possibilities of implementing lesson study and working with boundaries to support teacher professional learning.
      76  7Scopus© Citations 3
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A Chinese learner and her self-regulated learning: An autoethnography
    In this paper, I use an autoethnographical approach, coupled with existing research literature on Chinese learners and learning, to reflect upon my own experiences as a junior high school student in order to explore how Chinese students perceive their learning, and how they establish and justify their own sense of self-regulation in learning. I examine how self-regulation is interpreted in Western literature about learning, and how my learning experiences can provide a window to rethink self-regulated learning and learners from an indigenous Chinese perspective.
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