Now showing 1 - 10 of 24
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A qualitative meta-analysis on the use of serious games to support learners with intellectual and developmental disabilities: What we know, what we need to know and what we can do
    This paper provides a qualitative meta-analysis of the literature on the use of serious games to assist learners with intellectual and developmental disabilities. It aims to identify the research trends and the possible directions for future research. The study begins with a preliminary online search and selection of a sample of articles to identify the main categories of disabilities. This is followed by a detailed analysis of a selection of articles chosen on the basis of their relevance, year of publication and representation of the studies carried out in this field. The preliminary analysis of articles published in recent years showed that the majority of the articles dealt with the use of digital games to support learners with intellectual disabilities. The findings revealed reports of participants’ higher engagement levels and motivation when learning with serious games, in addition to improved competence or performance in domains of language learning and numeracy. Nevertheless, most researchers acknowledged the need for more rigour in validating the effectiveness of the new games as learning tools.
      355  218
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Reviewing the link between creativity and madness: A postmodern perspective
    (2006-10)
    Researchers on creativity and psychology have long been fascinated with the high incidence of psychotic behavior amongst geniuses and individuals of exceptional creativity. The aims of this paper are first, to review the existing findings for a better insight into the socio-contextual factors underpinning the mad genius conundrum, and secondly, to discuss how the development of postmodern thoughts and beliefs have influenced our perception and understanding of the emotional fabric of highly creative, though mentally-ill individuals. While one cannot ignore the substantial body of evidence in support of the relationship between genius and madness, it is likely that many of the factors inducing psychosis in geniuses are no different from those achieving the same effects in ordinary people. Furthermore, the unique features of post-modern times may have contributed to erasing the fine line between creativity and insanity, in ways that would not have been possible a century earlier.
      681  996
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Reviewing simulation-based learning at Temasek Polytechnic through an evaluation framework
    (2011-09)
    Fang, Linda
    ;
    Tan, Hock Soon
    ;
    When Temasek Polytechnic‘s School of Engineering embarked on a research project to investigate the effects of Simulation-based learning on second year Mechatronics students, multiple qualitative and quantitative studies were carried out simultaneously. The intervention was an infusion of a suite of five Simulation-based learning (SBL) modules into the curriculum for three of five Machining Technology classes in the October 2008 semester. The individual studies highlighted the positive effects of this intervention. A model for SBL was even developed based on the results and findings of the multiple studies. This paper uses the Kirkpatrick Learning Evaluation Model as a framework to review the effectiveness of SBL for Machining Technology. Only three of the four levels of learning, namely response (Level 1), learning (Level 2) and behavior (Level 3) are involved. The results and findings of the various studies will be clustered and compared according to these levels to derive a more consolidated understanding of the effectiveness of SBL.
      140  209
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The development of moral reasoning in Singaporean youths
    (2009-03)
    A large body of Western research literature has provided extensive discussions on the development of moral values, moral education and moral reasoning in adolescents and youths. Of particular interest, are the theoretical frameworks proposed and/or debated by researchers such as Kohlberg, Gilligan, Rest Lickona and Lipman. Whereas Kohlberg is credited as the originator of the theory of moral development, purporting six stages the cognitive development of moral judgment, his epic work has been critiqued, refined and improved over the years. In Asian contexts, however, research in these areas is still at the stage of early progression and expansion. Nevertheless, values education and moral development are two pertinent aspects in the citizenship building agenda of young nations such as Singapore. This paper explores the moral development of Singaporean youths using a Kohlbergian research framework, with the aim of providing an Asian perspective to the existing model. It presents an overview of the role of moral development in the Singapore educational context, before describing the methodology used and the interim results obtained.
      433  847
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A motivational analysis of project work in Singapore using self-determination theory
    Our students today face a knowledge-based economy, which requires the ability to learn independently, to be innovative in using and synthesizing knowledge, and to adapt fast to the changing world. Project Work (PW) is introduced as one of the instructional models for a more student-centered approach of learning in Singapore. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of project work (PW) and study the motivational processes of PW using a self-determination theory (SDT) framework. A total of 435 students from Normal Academic stream (NA) and Normal Technical stream (NT) were recruited from four secondary schools in Singapore. Students‟ perceptions of the values of PW, basic psychological needs, relative autonomy, enjoyment, and grades were measured across three time points. Results showed that students valued the PW experience. However, their enjoyment, needs, and relative autonomy decreased significantly in the 10 to 12 weeks of PW experience. Multiple regression analyses revealed that post-PW enjoyment negatively predicted PW grades, while psychological needs, relative autonomy and pre-PW enjoyment positively predicted post-PW enjoyment. After 6-month PW, post-PW enjoyment emerged as a stronger predictor than grades in predicting the perceived skills learned from PW. The study applies self-determination theory to the PW context and highlights the importance of facilitating the three psychological needs in the PW context to enhance students‟ motivation and achievement in PW.
      753  1365
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Students’ discourse and motivation in project work
    This study, undertaken in Singapore, investigates aspects of students' motivation in undertaking Project Work (PW), and explores the link between motivation and the quality of students' discourse during group discussions. It uses a Self-Determination framework to answer questions on students' perceived satisfaction ofbasic psychological needs, motivation and performance outcomes. Analysis of students' discourse during PW helped to substantiate survey findings, which showed that the participating students perceived satisfaction in the need for competence and relatedness, but less in autonomy support. Furthermore, many students were extrinsically motivated in PW, appreciating its value but not necessarily finding enjoyment in the process. Students' talk during PW group discussions tended to be of the practical (problem-solving) mode and cumulative (collaborative, non-critical) type. The findings suggest that, in order to enhance motivation and task engagement, students should be encouraged to share knowledge explicitly and to make their thinking visible through discourse.
      406  180
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Using simulations to enhance learning and motivation in machining technology
    (2009-11)
    Tan, Hock Soon
    ;
    Tan, Kim Cheng
    ;
    Fang, Linda
    ;
    May, Lin Wee
    ;
    Recent advances in technology have introduced new tools to enhance learning. In the context of polytechnic education, simulation based learning (SBL) has been used to improve learning and motivation of engineering students studying Machining Techchnology in the Mechatronics course. This study investigates the effect of SBL on students’ learning and motivation in a practice-oriented topic. In the study, students in the control group received conventional instructions and workshop practices while students in the experimental group had an additional component on SBL in the laboratory. Both groups, however, received an equal amount of time on the subject. A post intervention test followed by a survey was administered at the end of the study. This paper highlights the findings from both instruments, showing that SBL can improve student learning outcomes as well as the motivation to learn.
      342  153
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Eportfolios in initial teacher education in Singapore: Methodological issues
    (2012-07) ;
    Zhou, Mingming
    ;
    ; ;
    Chew, Evelyn
    Eportfolios were introduced into teacher education in the 1980s. Since then, educational researchers and practitioners have increasingly cited the use of portfolios as an important assessment and learning tool in teacher education programs. In the domain of teacher education, the need to improve quality, attain established standards and to resolve accreditation issues have led to the increased use of ePortfolios in many European states and others around the world (Granberg, 2010). An electronic portfolio (ePortfolio) is often defined as “a digitized collection of artifacts, including demonstrations, resources and accomplishments that represent an individual, group, community, organization, or institution. This collection can comprise of text-based, graphic or multimedia elements archived on a Web site or on other electronic media (Lorenzo & Ittelson, 2005, p. 3).” In pre-service teachers’ ePortfolios, artifacts can be samples of work that include lesson plans, stimulus materials, videos, pictures and picture files, classroom assignments, classroom tests, newsletters, and inservice materials produced by the pre-service teacher (Bruneau & Bie, 2010). With the creation of ePortfolios, student teachers can document their journey in becoming a teacher by selecting, sharing, and reflecting on artifacts such as educational philosophies, classroom management plans, unit and lesson plans, plans to meet the needs of diverse and special needs pupils, and video clips of practice teaching (e.g., Strudler & Wetzel, 2005). They can not only showcase their best work as a professional, but also exhibit the knowledge and skills in using technology.
      275  260
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Identifying motivational styles from the course work tests of ‘A’ level students in Singapore
    (2006-05) ;
    Galloway, David
    High levels of academic achievement in Asian educational systems have generated interest in the study of motivational patterns of students in these contexts. The objectives of this paper are firstly, to identify the occurrence of the different motivational styles amongst students in Singapore and secondly, to provide a critique of the assessment technique used and its application in professional practice. The method of identifying the different motivational styles was adapted from a procedure first developed by Craske (1988). The findings of this study indicate that although the distribution of motivational styles amongst the Singaporean students was consistent with that obtained by Craske, there was a higher tendency for maladaptive motivation amongst the males than amongst the females. In contrast, Craske found no gender differentiation, though earlier researchers had found that maladaptive motivation was more common among the females. Although Craske’s technique has the advantage of providing a convenient and easily adaptable tool for assessing motivational outcome, it can only provide partial information on the motivational disposition of an individual, and hence it can be used in conjunction with conventional methods such as self-reporting instruments.
      114  91
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Project work and life skills: Psychometric properties of the life effectiveness questionnaire for project work
    The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Life Effectiveness Questionnaire - Version H (LEQ-H), an instrument for the assessment of life skills in project work (PW) context with Singaporean students. Specifically, we examined the internal consistency, as well as discriminant and convergent validity of the subscales in LEQ-H. Second, I've tested the proposed measurement model against four other alternative models and confirmed with a second sample. In addition, I've examined the invariance of the measurement tool across gender. A total of 1,264 secondary school students were recruited from nine typical government funded co-educational secondary schools in Singapore. All the subscales had adequate internal consistency but two subscales lacked convergent validity. Five competing models were compared using confirmatory factor analyses. The results provide evidence of a seven first-order measurement model of the LEQ-H. Multi-group analysis demonstrated invariance of the factor forms, factor loadings, factor variances, and factor covariances, error variances and disturbances across gender. In summa!)', the findings affirm that the LEQ-H, with the seven first-order measurement model, can be an appropriate measurement tool to assess the effects of PW on students' life skills such as time management, social competence, achievement motivation, task leadership, emotional control, active initiative and self-confidence.
      765  896