Now showing 1 - 10 of 66
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Achievement goals, implicit theories and behavioral regulation among polytechnic engineering students
    This study examined the relationships between the approach-avoidance dimension, as well as the mastery-performance dimension of achievement goals, implicit theory of intelligence, and behavioral regulations among engineering students in a polytechnic in the academic domain. Polytechnic students (n = 1359) from Singapore participated in the survey. They were assessed on achievement goal orientations, implicit beliefs, behavioral regulations, values, effort and enjoyment towards their course of study using questionnaires. Cluster analysis was conducted and the results showed that five distinct clusters could differentiate the students in terms of their achievement goals profiles. Follow-up tests between the clusters showed that the five clusters had differing psychological characteristics, and differing values, effort, and enjoyment towards their course of study. Taken together, the present study offers some insights into intraindividual‟s differences in achievement goals and its impact and offers some useful implications for interventions.
      503  277
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Students’ discourse and motivation in project work
    This study, undertaken in Singapore, investigates aspects of students' motivation in undertaking Project Work (PW), and explores the link between motivation and the quality of students' discourse during group discussions. It uses a Self-Determination framework to answer questions on students' perceived satisfaction ofbasic psychological needs, motivation and performance outcomes. Analysis of students' discourse during PW helped to substantiate survey findings, which showed that the participating students perceived satisfaction in the need for competence and relatedness, but less in autonomy support. Furthermore, many students were extrinsically motivated in PW, appreciating its value but not necessarily finding enjoyment in the process. Students' talk during PW group discussions tended to be of the practical (problem-solving) mode and cumulative (collaborative, non-critical) type. The findings suggest that, in order to enhance motivation and task engagement, students should be encouraged to share knowledge explicitly and to make their thinking visible through discourse.
      406  182
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Eportfolios in initial teacher education in Singapore: Methodological issues
    (2012-07) ;
    Zhou, Mingming
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    ; ;
    Chew, Evelyn
    Eportfolios were introduced into teacher education in the 1980s. Since then, educational researchers and practitioners have increasingly cited the use of portfolios as an important assessment and learning tool in teacher education programs. In the domain of teacher education, the need to improve quality, attain established standards and to resolve accreditation issues have led to the increased use of ePortfolios in many European states and others around the world (Granberg, 2010). An electronic portfolio (ePortfolio) is often defined as “a digitized collection of artifacts, including demonstrations, resources and accomplishments that represent an individual, group, community, organization, or institution. This collection can comprise of text-based, graphic or multimedia elements archived on a Web site or on other electronic media (Lorenzo & Ittelson, 2005, p. 3).” In pre-service teachers’ ePortfolios, artifacts can be samples of work that include lesson plans, stimulus materials, videos, pictures and picture files, classroom assignments, classroom tests, newsletters, and inservice materials produced by the pre-service teacher (Bruneau & Bie, 2010). With the creation of ePortfolios, student teachers can document their journey in becoming a teacher by selecting, sharing, and reflecting on artifacts such as educational philosophies, classroom management plans, unit and lesson plans, plans to meet the needs of diverse and special needs pupils, and video clips of practice teaching (e.g., Strudler & Wetzel, 2005). They can not only showcase their best work as a professional, but also exhibit the knowledge and skills in using technology.
      275  261
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Teachers’ perceptions of autonomy support
    (Fayetteville State University, 2023)
    Siacor, Kimberly Hannah
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    ;
    This paper aimed to elucidate teachers' perceptions of using autonomy support in Singapore's classrooms. Science and mathematics teachers (N = 10) were gathered for semi-structured interviews after a 10-week autonomy support intervention. Interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis with emerging themes pre-conceived from the literature. The qualitative data provides meaningful insights into the teachers' understanding of what autonomy support entails, to which relevant examples of what teachers said and did to be autonomy-supportive were illuminated. The findings present an in-depth description of teachers' experiences of autonomy support, suggesting the interconnected nature of the autonomy-supportive features. Teachers should practice the features of autonomy support in a meaningful and simultaneous manner to support the students effectively. Despite the limitations, the concrete examples of autonomy-supportive practices delineated in this paper can be used as a springboard for teacher education programs and autonomy-support training workshops.
      5
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A motivational analysis of project work in Singapore using self-determination theory
    Our students today face a knowledge-based economy, which requires the ability to learn independently, to be innovative in using and synthesizing knowledge, and to adapt fast to the changing world. Project Work (PW) is introduced as one of the instructional models for a more student-centered approach of learning in Singapore. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of project work (PW) and study the motivational processes of PW using a self-determination theory (SDT) framework. A total of 435 students from Normal Academic stream (NA) and Normal Technical stream (NT) were recruited from four secondary schools in Singapore. Students‟ perceptions of the values of PW, basic psychological needs, relative autonomy, enjoyment, and grades were measured across three time points. Results showed that students valued the PW experience. However, their enjoyment, needs, and relative autonomy decreased significantly in the 10 to 12 weeks of PW experience. Multiple regression analyses revealed that post-PW enjoyment negatively predicted PW grades, while psychological needs, relative autonomy and pre-PW enjoyment positively predicted post-PW enjoyment. After 6-month PW, post-PW enjoyment emerged as a stronger predictor than grades in predicting the perceived skills learned from PW. The study applies self-determination theory to the PW context and highlights the importance of facilitating the three psychological needs in the PW context to enhance students‟ motivation and achievement in PW.
      753  1366
  • Publication
    Open Access
    From intrinsic motivation to passion in sport and exercise: A self-determination theory framework
    (2010) ; ;
    Chatzisarantis, Nikos
    ;
    Lim, Carol Boon San
    Adolescence is a critical period in the study of physical activity (PA). Research evidence has shown that there is a decline in participation in P A in young people over their teenage years with ages 11 to 12 thought to be a critical age period at which PA begins to diminish. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between students' perceived autonomy support, behavioural regulations, and enjoyment in a physical education (PE) context, using a selfdetermination theory framework. Participants were 1854 secondary school students aged between 13 and 19 years from Singapore. Questionnaires were used to access perceived autonomy support, behavioural regulations, and enjoyment in PE. Results showed that perceived autonomy support predicted more self-determined forms of behavioural regulations in PE (intrinsic and identified) positively and negatively predicted more controlling forms of regulations (external and amotivation). Only intrinsic motivation positively predicted enjoyment. On the other hand, amotivation negatively predicted enjoyment. The findings highlight the importance of perceived autonomy support in fostering more self-determined forms of behavioural regulations and intrinsic motivation in school PE.
      207  262
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Longitudinal changes in physical fitness performance in youth: A multilevel latent growth curve modeling approach
    (Sage, 2013) ;
    Pyun, Do Young
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    ;
    Lim, Carol Boon San
    ;
    Li, Fuzhong
    Using a multilevel latent growth curve modeling (LGCM) approach, this study examined longitudinal change in levels of physical fitness performance over time (i.e., 4 years) in young adolescents aged from 12 to 13 years old. The sample consisted of 6,622 students from 138 secondary schools in Singapore. Initial analyses found between-school variation on fitness test scores with intraclass correlations ranging from .02 to .19. Subsequent multilevel growth curve analyses revealed a quadratic trend of the longitudinal data across five stations of performance tests, with significant within-school student variability in change over time. The result of the multilevel LGCM showed that the there were strong school effects on all the physical fitness performances, in addition to inter- and intra-individual differences.
    WOS© Citations 2Scopus© Citations 2  148  311
  • Publication
    Open Access
    WOS© Citations 10Scopus© Citations 15  48  130
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A motivation profile analysis of Malay students in Singapore
    This study aims to examine the motivational profiles of Malay students in Singapore based self-regulated learning framework (Pintrich & De Groot, 1990) and self-determination theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 1985). The sample consisted of 740 secondary school Malay students (415 males, 325 females). Using cluster analysis, five different clusters of students were found based on their unique characteristics on self-regulation and learning strategies scores. The clusters were named from best to poor in numeric order. Cluster 1 is characterised by high scores on intrinsic value, self-efficacy, self-regulation, and lower scores on lack of learning strategies and anxiety compared to other clusters. On the other hand, cluster 5 has the lowest intrinsic values, self-efficacy, and self-regulation relative to their scores on other clustering variables. In addition, the more adaptive profiles were also found to score higher in enjoyment and effort, and lower in boredom, compared to other clusters. The findings suggest that intra-individual differences in self-regulated learning behaviour are associated with the expected differences in the type of motivation possessed, and learning outcome measures. Overall, the findings from the study shows that Malays students do possess adaptive qualities known to facilitate learning outcomes.
    WOS© Citations 2Scopus© Citations 2  113  202