Now showing 1 - 10 of 24
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A Singapore perspective on teacher education: The old man, the mountain, and the child
    (2012-04)
    Teacher development in Singapore is unique from the continuum approach from initial teacher education to life-long professional development where goal congruence and pragmatic policies and practices amongst university, schools and the Ministry of Education help steer the teaching profession towards high standards and commitment. Teaching is a calling and effective teachers have a unity of purpose in their personal aspirations, beliefs, interests and competencies with a view of impacting the next generation and a system of evaluation and accountability builds on (a) Learner-centred values, (b) Teacher identity values (c) The values of service to the profession and community. The challenges of diverse societal expectations, impact of rapid educational transformations and balancing accountability measures and autonomous professional trust will also be addressed. The Old Man represents the wisdom of traditions. In the case of Singapore the traditions are the fundamentals. In the case of teach education at the National Institute of Education, the fundaments include thing like teaching as calling, good content knowledge, the teacher symbol, values-based ideals, the university-based professional, apprenticeship model. The Mountain represents looking up and beyond, which means vision and viewing the big picture and long haul approach rather than politicised or quick fixes. The mountain reminds us of mould the teacher to mould the child for the future. Vision calls for the partnership of MOE, schools, NIE and the community. It calls for visionary professional building. Finally the idea of the Child is that it takes a village to prepare a child because teacher education is about the learner. It is preparing the teacher to care of even the most diverse and weakest child.
      265  1064
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Flourishing creativity: Education in an age of wonder
    The 21st century is often described as an age of uncertainty and ambiguity with unprecedented challenges. Those with a creative mindset however might call this millennium an age of wonder. New technologies and digital media are facilitating imagination and inventiveness. How are we innovating education? Are schools and classroom fostering creativity? This chapter will discuss the understanding of the cognitive functions of creativity and relate these to curriculum and pedagogy. It will deal with issues such as tapping on the powers of psychological habits and novelty, contextualizing learning, providing for serendipity, imagination and play.
    WOS© Citations 7Scopus© Citations 12  220  245
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Reflections on the teacher education model for the twenty-first century (TE21) and V3SK: Legacy and lessons
    (Springer, 2023) ;
    Chua, Jallene Jia En
    This article will reflect on the first author’s deanship journey from 2008 to 2014, which saw the mobilization of the NIE Teacher Education Model for the 21st Century (TE21) and conceptualization of the V3SK framework for teacher education curriculum. Taking a big picture approach, the model and framework were architecturally derived through our building block and improvement systems approach where strong foundations were critical. The period of the late 2000s through the next decade saw an increased interest in education reforms worldwide. Two major trends saw a confluence in interest in Singapore. Firstly, there was increased research pointing to the importance of the teacher factor. Secondly, enhanced interest in the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) and international comparisons placed Singapore under global spotlight owing to her remarkable performance. Singapore drew much attention from education ministries around the world, which were visiting Singapore to learn how we invest in education and more importantly what we do to bring ideas to fruition. It became clear that the teacher factor was a significant reason for Singapore’s success. This article will share on how TE21 was a scholarly and pragmatic endeavour resulting from research-informed and motivated teacher educators working with partners and stakeholders in practice whilst taking a globalized perspective. The pinnacle of the TE21 model was the V3SK framework which continues to permeate theory and practice. The framework has gone beyond a professional guidepost to capturing the importance of the teacher symbol. In essence, we were building on roots, culture, values, and wisdom as we tapped on science and evidence.
      23
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Science, social responsibility, and education: The experience of Singapore during the COVID-19 pandemic
    (2021) ;
    Chua, Jallene Jia En
    In this chapter we first outline how the pandemic unfolded United Kingdom before highlighting the key thinking and strategies Singapore adopted in policy responses towards the crisis. The two key principles of Singapore’s approach, science, and social responsibility, contributed greatly to its success in handling the public health crisis. This chapter will elaborate on these principles and examine how these policies were carried out in the educational realm. We look at how Singapore relied on its strengths of proactive rational planning and execution to facilitate the transition to home-based learning (HBL) and the subsequent re-opening of schools. Concomitant with policies to address health and well-being for all students were strategies to ensure continuity of learning, student engagement, and innovation in the new learning environment. The use of online learning portals such as the Student Learning Space enabled all students from primary to pre-university levels to have equal access to quality curriculum resources. Professional development and preparation of teachers pertaining to facilitating new modes of learning were as important as implementation measures. Given the unexpected impact of the pandemic and the need for scalability there were also many challenges to ensure equitable access and holistic well-being for vulnerable groups of students. Looking forward, we discuss the implications of the pandemic on Singapore’s education scene, such as how it elevated core issues related to curriculum, pedagogy, and design of learning environments. We talk about opportunities for some of these issues to be addressed in policy and research, and how doing so can better build an adaptable education system for the twenty-first century.
    Scopus© Citations 14  54
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    The honeycomb of Early Childhood Development (ECD): A big picture approach for supporting development and education for early years
    (Springer, 2022) ;
    Chua, Jallene Jia En
    The power of education is far-reaching and universal, impacting people’s capacity for adaptation in our world today. Singapore’s dearth of natural resources necessitates a strong reliance on its skilled labor force, making education an especially important investment for this nation. Singapore’s education system has been lauded for its successful outcomes, but the same success cannot be said for its early childhood system. Greater awareness toward the extensive importance of early childhood care and education (ECCE) has called for heightened efforts to holistically develop the sector in order to adequately prepare our children for the future. At this juncture, it is beneficial to understand early childhood development (ECD) with systematic thinking and connectivity to truly bring about transformation. In this chapter, we propose the honeycomb of early childhood development (ECD) to drive research, practice, and policies in ECD. It comprises six important factors: 1) economics, where we talk about ECD as an investment that is practical for our economy and beneficial for children when done early and strategically; 2) equity, where the importance of enabling access to ECCE for every child is highlighted; 3) essence, where we consider ECCE as a crucial phase of life that every child is entitled to; 4) education, where we discuss the types of curriculum and pedagogies that need to be incorporated together; 5) educators, where the role of preschool teachers, teacher education, and teacher policies are discussed; and 6) ecology, where the relevance of various stakeholders and parties in ECD is brought to attention.
      241
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Singapore math and science education: The larger picture beyond PISA achievements and “secret” factors
    Changes in the industrial world and society today far outpace the cycles of education reform in the curriculum. The digital age and social media have changed the nature of knowledge acquisition in mathematics and science. Complexity of problems, technological innovations, multi-disciplinary interfaces and the availability of big data analytics call for new ways of learning in mathematics and science education. PISA achievements in Singapore is a corollary of continuous incremental improvements plus quantum leap changes in the Singapore Math and Science curricula ecology. This chapter aims to provide the big picture of how mathematics education and science education in Singapore ride on waves of change to equip learners with the kinds of thinking needed for the future world of work. Beyond the rigor of well-planned and resourced syllabuses rich in fundamentals and heuristics are the pedagogical approaches of process thinking and applied learning. The aligning of learning with applications in an ecology of inquiry and authentic experiences at every level has been catalytic for the success of Singapore learners. In the light of all these is the teacher policy factor that brings about the Math and Science teachers who can bring about student engagement and agency in their pursuit of STEM aspirations.
      33
  • Publication
    Unknown
    Introduction to early childhood development and research in Singapore
    Education and well-being care are important throughout life, but especially so during early childhood, a time characterized by profound neural change. Importantly, early life experiences and neurodevelopment, in turn, lay the foundation for the subsequent ways in which neurodevelopment unfolds. As neurodevelopment is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, it is not surprising that the quality of early childhood experiences has been found to have short- and long-term impacts upon individuals and society. For example, early environments characterized by relative responsiveness from caregivers (Fraley et al., 2013; Raby et al., 2015) may lead to academic and/or social competence even into adulthood. On the other hand, early childhood experiences with poverty and/or low socioeconomic status, exposure to parental mental health difficulties, forms of insecure attachment, and abuse or trauma have been linked to outcomes such as lower levels of school readiness, attentional problems, and/or difficulties in socioemotional development (e.g., Psychogiou et al., 2020; Fearon & Belsky, 2004; Dearing et al., 2001; Enlow et al., 2012).