Now showing 1 - 10 of 22
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Perspectives of stakeholders on youth with intellectual disabilities transitioning to adulthood
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ; ;
    Transition is difficult for everyone, but it is particularly challenging for youth with disabilities and their families. When these youth transition out of school to post school environments, they will move from a structured environment with clear daily routines, with school personnel who are tasked to teach and support them, to environments where ongoing support and services are not readily available. Some of these youth with disabilities enter work environments that can be impersonal and most of them are unprepared for the level of independence that is required of them (Sitlington, Frank, & Carson, 1992). Many of them will find difficulty forming social networks as an adult and feel isolated in the community (Amado, Stancliffe, McCarron, & McCallion, 2013). Many youth with disabilities leave school with no employment in the near future (Nord, Luecking, Mank, Kiernan, & Wray, 2013) and to further complicate matters, there may be limited places at alternative day activity centres for them (Enabling Masterplan, 2012). These group of youth with disabilities may be inactive, socially isolated, and will continue to rely on family for any social and community interaction (Lichtenstein & Michaelides, 1993; Ow & Lang, 2000).
      166  184
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Improving literacy of the visually impaired in Singapore: Pre-, post- and in-between literacy considerations
    This paper underscores the importance of a multi-prong approach to literacy when considering literacy needs of the visually impaired in Singapore. While acquisition of literacy is often considered as a single prong approach, there is a need to satisfy the pre-literacy; post-literacy and in-between literacy needs if persons with visual impairments are to have equitable access to information. Each of these three prongs is considered in turn focusing particularly on braille, alternative formats and access to such mediums of communication for the visually impaired. These are critical given that it is through multiple modalities that the visually impaired are able to access a diversity of materials. The absence of information in one modality may be available in an alternative format. The needs also extend beyond the young as with the prospect of an aging society looming, the elderly who are predisposed to visual impairment will need to be equipped with literacy skills.
      183  1744
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Supporting inclusive education: Negotiating home-school partnership in Singapore
    (2015) ;
    Ng, Zi Jia
    ;
    While there has been growing theoretical and policy interest in the areas of home-school partnership and inclusive education, relatively little work has linked the two fields. Where there have been studies, these have focused primarily on parent or school perspective. With inclusive education in its nascent stage in Singapore, this study examines the different roles emerging from home and school as well as factors underpinning this partnership. Data was drawn from interviews with 13 parents and 30 school staff. Our findings indicate that home-school partnership is a work in progress that is continually subject to home and school dynamics. The expectations and perceptions of parents and educators must be taken into consideration if the partnership is to succeed and sustain. Support from the wider community creates a synergy which reinforces home-school partnership and increases the visibility of children with disabilities by turning a private concern into a shared societal issue.
      880  2011
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Assistive technology use amongst students with visual impairments and their teachers: Barriers and challenges in special education
    (2012) ;
    Cohen, Libby G.
    Assistive technologies (AT) enable individuals who are visually impaired to read and write, access information and enhance communication. This study investigated the use of AT by students with visual impairments and their teachers in a special school. While teachers unequivocally recognized the benefits of AT, there were significant gaps and disconnections in AT knowledge and skills amongst teachers. For students, a majority were not using nor had much knowledge of AT. While the school had made some efforts to introduce AT, the experience of students was limited as inconsistencies in use of and access to AT were dependent on teachers' skills and the availability of equipment. Parents, siblings, friends and peers, and other social networks emerged as important sources of influence.
      764  938
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Supporting students with special needs in secondary schools: a study of perspective, practices, and support structures
    (2011-08) ; ;
    Sarinajit Kaur
    ;
    Khaw, Joanne
    ;
    Ng, Zi Jia
    "This study sought to understand how students with mild disabilities are supported in Singapore mainstream schools."-page 14.
      402  227
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Not without us: Perspectives on disability and inclusion in Singapore
    (Ethos Books, 2023)
    Zhuang, Kuansong Victor
    ;
    ;
    Goodley, Dan
      142
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Exploring the emerging identities of special needs officers in Singapore primary and secondary schools
    (2011)
    Lim, Sirene May Yin
    ;
    ;
    Cohen, Libby G.
    This study explored the ways in which a group of 30 newly qualified Allied Educators (Learning & Behavioural Support), or AED (LBS), grew into their professional role within their school communities and the kinds of responsibilities they faced daily. Many of them were also the only AED (LBS) in their school. Findings revealed that these AED (LBS) took on a spectrum of roles in school and faced a range of expectations, from having to be miracle workers to being relegated to administrative support. The most well-adjusted AED (LBS) were the ones who were in school communities that had a collaborative learning culture, were supportive of students with heterogeneous needs, and were surrounded by more teachers and school leaders who had knowledge in special education.
      458  1351
  • Publication
    Restricted
    From beliefs to practice: Students with visual impairments, teachers and their perspectives on assistive technology
    (2011-03) ;
    Cohen, Libby G.
    ;
    Tan, Denise Ching Ting
    "The primary research questions are: 1. What are the barriers and challenges to using assistive technology by students with visual impairments? 2. What are the classroom pedagogies, beliefs, and practices of teachers of students with visual impairments?--[page 2].
      315  72