Now showing 1 - 10 of 19
  • Publication
    Open Access
    China in the global field of international student mobility: An analysis of economic, human and symbolic capitals
    The global landscape of higher education is an uneven field where players like nation-states are placed in hierarchical and centre-periphery relations. This paper focuses on the global field of international student mobility (ISM) and investigates China’s place in the field using an analytical framework consisting of three key categories of ‘capital’: economic, human, and symbolic. Drawing on existing scholarship and author’s first-hand ethnographic research, the paper examines the case of China as both a source and a destination of ISM, and analyses the flows and accrual of these three forms of capital as consequences of outbound and inbound student mobilities. Analyses show that in a global ISM field characterised by asymmetries and inequalities, China’s place is arguably semi-peripheral economically and symbolically. It is argued that this country-focused macro perspective complements existing ISM scholarship’s emphasis on social reproduction at individual and private levels.
    WOS© Citations 46Scopus© Citations 50  92  420
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Immigration, population, and foreign workforce in Singapore: An overview of trends, policies, and issues
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2017)
    Yang, Hui
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    Zhan, Shaohua
      103  3699
  • Publication
    Open Access
    “Positive energy”: Hegemonic intervention and online media discourse in China’s Xi Jinping era
    (2018) ;
    Tang, Lijun
    Scholarship to-date agrees that the internet has weakened the Chinese party-state’s ideological and discursive hegemony over society. In this paper, we document a recent intervention into public discourse exercised by the Chinese state through appropriating and promoting a popular online catchphrase—“positive energy” (zheng nengliang). Analyzing the “positive energy” phenomena using Laclau and Mouffe’s theory of hegemony and discourse, we argue that the relative effectiveness of this hegemonic intervention rests on the semantic versatility of “positive energy”, which enables “chains of equivalence” to be established between the label’s popular meanings on the one hand and its propagandist meanings on the other.
      486  693
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Immigrant teachers in Singapore schools: Backgrounds, integration, and diversification
    (2019) ;
    Chow, Lee Tat
    Immigrant-background teachers make up a fragment of the teacher population in mainstream Singapore schools. Though modest in terms of number, the presence of these teachers in the Singapore teaching workforce is arguably significant in other ways. To date, little research attention has been paid to this unique group of teachers. Based on a Ministry of Education-National Institute of Education (MOE-NIE) funded study (OER 16/17 YPD), this article provides an overview of the characteristics and experiences of immigrant teachers in mainstream Singapore primary and secondary schools, with a focus on the practical challenges and value tensions they encounter in the professional settings. Findings show that immigrant teachers are generally well integrated into the Singapore education system notwithstanding certain challenges. Meanwhile, some teachers’ experiences of negotiating with value differences suggest that immigrant teachers may have the potential to add diversity to the education system, although this potential appears to be limited by the pragmatic imperative of professional integration.
      227  425
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A politician, a social scientist, and a social worker Walk into a bar: Towards a taxonomy of social studies inquiry questions
    (National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (NIE NTU), Singapore, 2021) ;
    Chua, Jun Yan
    Inquiry-based learning has gained prominence in secondary-school humanities education in Singapore in recent years. In Social Studies (SS), the loci of inquiry learning are “Issue Investigation” as found in the 2016 Express and Normal (Academic) syllabus and “Performance Task” in the 2014/15 Normal (Technical) syllabus, respectively. Due to the relatively short time inquiry has been given explicit emphasis, to date research into this new aspect of SS education remains very limited. This paper focuses on an important yet often neglected step of the SS inquiry process—the development of inquiry questions. To explore how different ways of crafting the SS inquiry question may lead to distinct inquiry approaches and processes, a taxonomy of SS inquiry questions is proposed based on empirical observations. The taxonomy comprises three categories of questions: the “politician’s question”, the “social worker’s question”, and the “social scientist’s question”. The implications and applications of this taxonomy for SS instruction are also discussed with reference to the multifaceted aims of SS education in Singapore.
      46  47
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Singapore secondary school teachers' experiences with implementing Social Studies issues investigation: An exploratory study
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020)
    Today, Inquiry-based Learning (IBL) is a powerful imperative in educational practice and a notable area of educational research. Past research has found IBL to be more effective than traditional/conventional classroom instruction strategies, but most evidence came from research on science instruction. In comparison, IBL in the social science and humanities subjects, particularly Social Studies (SS) education. appears to have been under-studied. This proposed study seeks to address this gap through investigating Singapore secondary school teachers' experiences with Issue Investigation the IBL component in the local SS syllabus. In Singapore, the emphasis on inquiry in SS is relatively new, and thus there is so far little research on this topic. Specifically, this study seeks to reveal how Issue Investigation is currently understood by SS teachers, with regard to its underlying rationale, purpose, and its relation to the rest of the SS syllabus. The study also aims to find out and analyse SS teachers' varied experiences of implementing Issue Investigation in their schools/classrooms, with a view towards identifying the characteristics of and possible contributing factors to successful/positive experiences as well as problematic/negative experiences. Through achieving these research objectives, the study ultimately seeks to use its findings to further support Singapore teachers in making more effective use of Issue Investigation as a powerful pedagogy, and to lay the groundwork for more systematic and in-depth research on inquiry-based SS in Singapore. In line with the stated research objectives, a qualitative research approach is proposed. Qualitative data will be collected chiefly through interviews and focus-group discussions (FGD) with SS teachers, Subject Heads, and Heads of Departments in secondary schools in Singapore, supplemented by collection of relevant documentary data and/or artefacts. It is estimated that up to 15 teachers from up to 5 schools will be involved in this study.
      117  4
  • Publication
    Open Access
      77  69
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Taming “issue investigation”: Singapore secondary social studies teachers’ accounts of challenges encountered and strategies for coping
    The upper-secondary Social Studies (SS) syllabus (Express/Normal-Academic) released in Singapore in 2016 introduced an inquiry-based component called “Issue Investigation” (II). Given the relatively recent nature of this introduction, so far there has been little research on II. Drawing on a small qualitative study, this article reports on some of the typical challenges experienced by Singapore SS teachers in implementing and enacting II, as well as the coping strategies they developed. According to these teachers’ accounts, II was from the outset hindered by an exam-driven pragmatic attitude prevalent in Singapore schools; whereas specific enactment challenges included the II’s (perceived) overwhelming scope and depth, time constraints, and deficits of certain skills or preparedness among students and teachers. Faced with these challenges, teachers developed broadly two types of coping strategies—simplification and “piggybacking”—to tame II by making it manageable, both for the students and for themselves.
      206  144
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Desiring ‘foreign talent’: Lack and Lacan in anti-immigrant sentiments in Singapore
    In recent years, the Singapore government’s pro-immigration policy – specifically, its recruitment of so-called ‘foreign talent’ – has caused a palpable rise in anti-immigrant sentiments and discourses among natives of the city-state. Drawing on Lacanian psychoanalysis, a perspective so far marginal in migration research, this article offers a provocative reading of Singapore’s desire for foreign talent and the local society’s reception of these subjects. The article focuses on the ways in which frustrated Singaporeans seem to find foreign talent immigrants, especially those from mainland China, to be lacking and undesirable. Lacan’s theories enable the bold interpretations that: 1) foreign talent is not meant to fill a lack but precisely to produce it and 2) foreign talent stands for Singapore’s and Singaporeans’ unobtainable object of desire, which ultimately signifies the gaps and inconsistencies in the symbolic order confronting them. Moving away from existing conceptual frameworks and theoretical approaches, the article illustrates what a psychoanalytic lens of desire can contribute to migration and mobility research.
    Scopus© Citations 20WOS© Citations 21  249  448