Now showing 1 - 10 of 118
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Making sense of a, b, c’s of science: A dialectics between everyday and scientific conception
    (2006-11)
    Yeo, Jennifer Ai Choo
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    ;
    Tang, Kok Sing
    Problem-based learning (PBL) was first introduced to address the problems of traditional instructional approaches that adopt the “learn first apply later” philosophy (Koschmann, Kelson, Feltovich & Barrows, 1996). But how effective is PBL in helping students to learn science? To this, we adopt Lemke’s social semiotic lens (1990) to investigate the conceptual meaning making process in discourses among students in a PBL context. Meaning, deeply embodied in cultural artifacts, is inseparable from the context, constructed through experiences and interaction, with the knower and known mutually coupled. To learn science is to be enculturated into its unique practices – ways of thinking and communication, and to appropriate its cultural tools constructed to facilitate communication, reasoning and problem solving. We conducted a study with a group of 14 year-old students working on problem related to mechanics over a period of three weeks. Interaction in a computer-supported collaborative learning environment was collected and analyzed. We adopted a micro-genetic approach to understand the meaning making process, with the goal of deriving effective scaffolding strategies. We intend to characterize instances of effective meaning making on scientific concepts and principles in the PBL process, and to derive possible conditions that lead to productive conceptual meaning making.
      333  20
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Analyzing CSCL-mediated science argumentation: how different methods matter
    (2009-06)
    Yeo, Jennifer Ai Choo
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    ; ; ;
    Lum, Shawn K. Y.
    Research on argumentation has increased our understanding of knowledge construction, group learning, and scaffolding structures in CSCL although analyses of argumentation pose many difficulties. This could be due to the many theoretical positions that can be taken when approaching discourse data. In this paper, we use three popular analytic methods (interactional, content-specific, and linguistic) to compare the same fragment of scientific argumentation by Grade 4 children in Singapore. We show the complementary emphases and strengths of each disciplinary position as well as their weaknesses. The results imply that analytic methods arising from different disciplinary positions can potentially broaden our overall understanding of using argumentation in CSCL.
      363  115
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Global trends in using digital technologies for learning

    We are living at a time when technologies have been infused into many aspects of our lives and are changing at an unprecedented rate. Worldwide, the average mobile subscription rate is more than 100 per cent, suggesting that some people are carrying more than one mobile device. The rapid advancement and pervasiveness of technologies have inspired educators and learners to tap the affordances of technologies for teaching and learning. This chapter discusses some pertinent issues related to integrating technologies into education, such as educational technology trends, changing approaches of using technologies for learning, critiques about technologies and research findings of the effectiveness of technology-supported learning.

      19
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Reflection of teaching: A glimpse through the eyes of pre-service science teachers
    (2010-12) ;
    Wettasinghe, Cyraine Marissa
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    ;
    Mazlan Hasan
    This paper examines pre-service teachers‟ reflection on teaching after participating in an online course using teaching videos of micro-skills coupled with self-reflection and group blogs. A total of 137 online entries were collected from 26 participants. Larrivee‟s (2008) four levels of reflection (pre, surface, pedagogical and critical) were used to code the reflection by the participants. The findings showed that 67% of the reflection by pre-service teachers falls in the pedagogical category and 2% in the critical category. These findings show that pre-service teachers are capable of engaging in reflection beyond a surface level even with limited actual classroom experience, and micro-skills teaching videos coupled with self-reflection and online blogs can serve as stimulus for reflection about actual teaching practices. The resources that the pre-service teachers used to make sense of teaching are (1) their knowledge of learning theories; (2) their ideas of teachers‟ roles and responsibilities; and (3) existing ideas of what makes good teaching. The pre-service teachers reflected upon their learning and showed evidence of willingness to incorporate the learnt ideas of good teaching into their future classroom teaching. The use of videos and reflection allowed them to restructure their teaching knowledge through identification, comparison, modification and synthesising.
      398  431
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Projecting ICT developments in teaching and learning for the near future: restructuring the landscape of teaching and learning interactions
    (2003) ; ;
    Chong, Diana Peet Yoon
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    Wong, Siew Koon Philip
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    Cheah, Horn Mun
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    Tan, Hoon Chiang
    ;
    In the current milieu of technological advancements, we are increasingly witnessing how technologies such as wireless and telecommunications can be integrated and taken advantage of in the daily interactions of the classroom and beyond. In this paper, we illustrate in simple yet novel ways how these technologies, which would in our opinion be prevalent in the near future, can be possibly adopted for teaching and learning. A case example of a teaching and learning environment as designed and developed will be illustrated. This case example illustrates the applications of wireless and mobile handheld devices, video-based learning management systems, and a flexible environment which facilitates group work.
      149  137
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Solving ill-structured problems mediated by online- discussion forums: Mass customisation of learning
    (2019-12-02)
    Ramya Chandrasekaran
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    ; ;
    Yeong, Foong May
    To foster students’ learning of critical-thinking skills, we incorporated ill-structured problems in a Human Diseases module for third-year Life Sciences students. Using a problem-solving rubric and working in groups of three, students attempted to solve problems presented to them. We mediated their discussions by asynchronous online discussion forums (AODFs) as part of mass customisation of learning for 40 students where personalised learning was constrained by structure of the module. We examined the quality of students’ discussion, focusing on the feedback group members provided to one another, using an interpreted Structure of Observed Learning Outcomes (SOLO) taxonomy to code students’ feedback. Our analysis indicated that the students were able to provide uni-structural and multi-structural level in relation to solving an ill-structured problem, even though they are not used to solving ill-structured problems. This indicated that in a mid-size class, while personalised-learning is not always easy, it is possible to mass customise learning for students using common ill-structured problems in a class by mediating problem-solving using student discussions as feedback. However, more can be done to scaffold peer feedback on solving ill-structured problems so that the level of collaborative-learning can be improved in a mass customised model that approaches personalised learning.
      137  143
  • Publication
    Open Access
    “But I have not started teaching!”: Knowledge building perils
    Scardamalia (2002) discussed the knowledge building notion as one which is built on social cognitive principles of learning. She proposed 12 principles focusing on collaborative knowing among students gearing toward building a community of learners in classrooms. However, how teachers become the key mediator for fostering knowledge building in classrooms is not fully explored. This study aims to contribute to the knowledge building research in terms of teacher professional development. Set in Singapore, where the dominant pedagogy is teacher-centred and routinised (Luke, Cazden, Lin & Freebody 2005), this paper examines the journey taken by two biology teachers trying to reform their classrooms by incorporating knowledge building principles. In one of our email exchanges with a teacher, she was exasperated with her attempt to bring knowledge building into her classroom. After a few sessions, she exclaimed “But I have not started teaching!” This prompted us to seek answers to the research question “What are the factors that will impact knowledge building efforts in a Singapore science classroom?” Interviews and transcript analysis of classroom lessons are used as data and interpretive methods of data analysis are used in this paper. The beliefs of the teachers are elicited through a semi-structured interview which takes the form of a post-lesson dialogue in this paper. The results of this study revealed three key areas of concern in adopting knowledge building principles, namely, renegotiation of institutional authority, changing beliefs about teaching, and learning and building students’ capacity for epistemic agency. In order for teachers to transform their practices in the classroom, there needs to be a structured and concerted understanding of these factors.
      140  125
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Use of information technology: Identifying the key competencies expected of pre-school teachers
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020)
    Cheung, Wing Sum
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    ;
    Hew, Khe Foon
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    Lee, Laureen
    In Singapore, IT has been used in preschools for many years (Cheung and Hu, 2002, Cheung, Hew and Chua, in-press). We do not have a clear guideline for training organizations to design and develop an IT course for preschool teachers. As a result, preschool teachers have varying standards to integrate IT in the curriculum. We believe there is a need to explore what IT skills and knowledge preschool teachers should have to integrate IT into the curriculum in the context of Singapore’s preschools.
  • Publication
    Unknown
    E-pedagogies in the making: Case studies from the National Institute of Education
    (2003) ; ;
    Wong, Siew Koon Philip
    ;
    Cheah, Horn Mun
    The purpose of this paper is to describe the more recent conceptions of learning in the light of more traditional conceptions which we are familiar with. These recent conceptions differ from traditional conceptions of individualistic thinking to a more collaborative and social nature towards learning. From these recent notions of learning and cognition, we discuss how the National Institute of Education is currently formulating e-pedagogies along the vein of these conceptions.
      378  144
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Practices of science teachers: Evidence from teacher noticing
    Teacher noticing patterns offer insights into in-the-moment decisions and actions of teachers that have a direct impact on students’ learning. However, research on differences between novice and expert teachers’ vision in lessons remain limited. Using a mobile eye-tracker, we collected and analyzed data from two science teachers. Findings showed that the expert teacher focused her attention on relevant information across the classroom, while the novice teacher’s attention was restricted to specific problematic areas. As a work-in-progress, this paper provides valuable insights that we can build onto existential work for further studies.
      91  75