Now showing 1 - 10 of 24
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Beyond the cognitive dimension: Emotion patterns in productive and improvable knowledge building discourse
    (2023)
    Hou, Chenyu
    ;
    ;
    Yang Yuqin

    Knowledge Building is a pedagogical approach emphasizing students' collective responsibility to continuously improve their community knowledge. Various emotions may arise during Knowledge Building activities because of students’ diverse ideas, theory-building and cognitive disequilibrium and equilibrium. These emotions may differ in inquiry threads at different discourse development levels. An inquiry thread is a sequence of notes addressing the same problem or topic. This study examines the frequency and sequential patterns between undergraduate students’ productive and improvable Knowledge Building inquiry threads recorded in Knowledge Forum. We found that emotions reflected in inquiry threads tend to be self-repeated. A series of positive and negative activating emotions were reflected in productive collaborative inquiry threads, suggesting students engaged in the discussion despite conflicting ideas and various emotions. On the other hand, improvable collaborative inquiry threads displayed activating to deactivating emotion transitions, such as joy to boredom, which shows that students might disengage from the discussion.

      16
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Examining university instructors’ conceptions and perceived changes in knowledge building professional development
    (International Society of the Learning Sciences, Inc., 2023)
    Lin, Feng
    ;
    Low, Wei Yan
    ;
    ;
    This is a work-in-process research project aiming at examining the design of Knowledge Building professional development (KBPD) to foster university instructors’ conceptions of teaching and learning and teaching practices. 10 instructors from the same university joined this study. Multiple sources of data were collected, including surveys, classroom and online artefacts, and interviews. Analysis of pre- and post-surveys showed that the participants hold more constructivist conceptions about teaching and learning after attending KBPD. The classroom reflection artefacts showed that they were more inclined to apply the KB principles in their own classes, and that they regarded the epistemological role of their students have shifted more towards knowledge constructors/creators in their classrooms after attending the KBPD. Interview analysis further showed in what ways they have changed their conceptions and perceived practices. Implications for future design of KBPD were discussed.
      12
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Collaborative analytics-supported reflective assessment for scaffolding pre-service teachers′ collaborative inquiry and knowledge building
    (2022)
    Yang, Yuqin
    ;
    ;
    Sun, Daner
    ;
    Chan, Carol K. K.
    Helping pre-service teachers (PSTs) develop competencies in collaborative inquiry and knowledge building is crucial, but this subject remains largely unexplored in CSCL. This study examines the design and process of collaborative analytics-supported reflective assessment and its effects on promoting PSTs to develop their competencies in collaborative inquiry and knowledge building. We used a quasi-experimental design that lasted 18 weeks. The experimental group was a class of 40 PSTs who took a liberal studies course with a knowledge building design enhanced by collaborative analytics-supported reflective assessment. The comparison group was a class of 28 PSTs taught by the same instructor who studied the same inquiry topics but experienced a regular knowledge building environment using portfolios. The analysis of the PSTs’ Knowledge Forum discourse showed that collaborative analytics-supported reflective assessment helps PSTs develop collaborative inquiry competencies for community knowledge advancement. The analysis of the PSTs’ reflection using collaborative analytics and prompt questions showed that the design using KBDeX visualization and knowledge building rubrics helped them engage in productive collaborative knowledge building inquiry by involving them in continuous monitoring, analysis, negotiation, synthesis of inquiry, identification of promising routes for inquiry, and actions to guide further collective inquiry. Implications for designing CSCL collaborative-analytics enriched with reflective assessment and student agency, and broadening CSCL and knowledge building approaches to pre-service teacher education are discussed.
    WOS© Citations 15Scopus© Citations 21  128  48
  • Publication
    Embargo
    How trait and state positive emotions, negative emotions, and self-regulation relate to adolescents’ perceived daily learning progress
    (Elsevier, 2024) ;
    Zheng, Juan
    ;
    Ratner, Kaylin
    ;
    Li, Qingyi
    ;
    Estevez, Melody
    ;
    Burrow, Anthony L.

    Previous research is replete with evidence that emotions and self-regulation work together to influence learning performance, but distinct trait and state features of emotions and self-regulation are rarely considered. With an analytic sample comprising 9,501 daily diaries from 280 adolescents participating in a self-driven learning program, this study used multilevel modeling to examine how trait and state positive and negative emotions and self-regulation interact to predict adolescents' perceived daily learning progress. Results suggested that daily perceived learning progress was associated with trait and state positive emotions and self-regulation, as well as trait negative emotions. Furthermore, there was a significant positive interaction between state positive emotions and state self-regulation on perceived daily learning progress, such that when adolescents' state self-regulation was higher than usual, their perceived daily learning progress was more sensitive to state positive emotion. Results underscore the importance of enhancing adolescents' self-regulation and positive emotion, and the feasibility of facilitating adolescents' learning even if they are in a state of greater negative emotion.

      14  13
  • Publication
    Embargo
    The influences of ChatGPT on undergraduate students’ demonstrated and perceived interdisciplinary learning
    (Springer, 2024)
    Zhong, Tianlong
    ;
    ;
    Hou Chenyu
    ;
    Wang, Yuhan
    ;
    Fan, Xiuyi

    The significance of interdisciplinary learning has been well-recognized by higher education institutions. However, when teaching interdisciplinary learning to junior undergraduate students, their limited disciplinary knowledge and underrepresentation of students from some disciplines can hinder their learning performance. ChatGPT’s ability to engage in human-like conversations and massive knowledge grounded in different disciplines holds promise in enriching undergraduate students with the disciplinary knowledge that they lack. In this exploratory study, we engaged 130 undergraduate students in a three-condition quasi-experiment to examine how ChatGPT influences their demonstrated and perceived interdisciplinary learning quality, as measured by their online posts and surveys, respectively. The content analysis results show that overall, students’ online posts could be coded into four interdisciplinary learning dimensions: diversity, disciplinary grounding, cognitive advancement, and integration. The means of the first three dimensions were close to the middle level (ranging from 0.708 to 0.897, and the middle level is 1), whereas the mean score of integration was relatively small (i.e., 0.229). Students under the ChatGPT condition demonstrated improved disciplinary grounding. Regarding their perceived interdisciplinary learning quality, we did not find significant differences across the three conditions in the pre- or post-surveys. The findings underscore ChatGPT’s ability to enhance students’ disciplinary grounding and the significance of further fostering their integration skills.

      17  17
  • Publication
    Embargo
    Interacting with supportive adults predicts greater same‒day psychosocial functioning among adolescents in a self‒driven learning program
    (2023)
    Ratner, Kaylin
    ;
    ;
    Li, Qingyi
    ;
    Estevez, Melody
    ;
    Burrow, Anthony L

    Introduction Supportive adults are a critical component of effective out-of-school time (OST) youth programs, yet the short-term dynamics that underlie their role are poorly understood. Within GripTape, a US-wide self-driven learning program, we examined if interactions with program-assigned adults (i.e., Champions) correspond with youths' daily psychosocial functioning (i.e., sense of purpose, self-concept clarity, and self-esteem).

    Method Participants were 204 North American adolescents (M [SD] = 16.42 [1.18] years; female = 70.1%, male = 25.0%) enrolled in GripTape, a remote OST program that empowers under-resourced teens to pursue their passions for ~10 weeks. During enrollment, youth are given autonomy to structure their learning goals and methods to best match their needs; a stipend of up to 500 USD; and an adult Champion to act as a touchpoint. Data collection consisted of a baseline survey before the program launch and a 5-min survey on each day of enrollment.

    Results Across ~70 days, we found that youth reported greater psychosocial functioning on days they reported interacting with their Champion. After controlling for same-day psychosocial functioning, we failed to find evidence that Champion interactions predicted youths' next-day psychosocial functioning.

    Conclusion In addition to being among the first studies to investigate the daily benefits of youth-adult interactions within OST programming, this study documents the short-term incremental change that may underlie previous work on OST program outcomes.

    WOS© Citations 1Scopus© Citations 1  64
  • Publication
    Embargo
    How trait and state positive emotions, negative emotions, and self-regulation relate to adolescents’ perceived daily learning progress
    (Sage, 2024) ;
    Zheng, Juan
    ;
    Ratner, Kaylin
    ;
    Li, Qingyi
    ;
    Estevez, Melody
    ;
    Burrow, Anthony L.

    Previous research is replete with evidence that emotions and self-regulation work together to influence learning performance, but distinct trait and state features of emotions and self-regulation are rarely considered. With an analytic sample comprising 9,501 daily diaries from 280 adolescents participating in a self-driven learning program, this study used multilevel modeling to examine how trait and state positive and negative emotions and self-regulation interact to predict adolescents' perceived daily learning progress. Results suggested that daily perceived learning progress was associated with trait and state positive emotions and self-regulation, as well as trait negative emotions. Furthermore, there was a significant positive interaction between state positive emotions and state self-regulation on perceived daily learning progress, such that when adolescents' state self-regulation was higher than usual, their perceived daily learning progress was more sensitive to state positive emotion. Results underscore the importance of enhancing adolescents' self-regulation and positive emotion, and the feasibility of facilitating adolescents' learning even if they are in a state of greater negative emotion.

      16  5
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Using learning analytics to explore the multifaceted engagement in collaborative learning
    (2022)
    Xing, Wanli
    ;
    ;
    Arslan, Okan
    ;
    Shim, Jaesub
    ;
    Popov, Vitaliy
    Engagement is critical in learning, including computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL). Previous studies have mainly measured engagement using students’ self-reports which usually do not capture the learning process or the interactions between group members. Therefore, researchers advocated developing new and innovative engagement measurements to address these issues through employing learning analytics and educational data mining (e.g., Azevedo in Educ Psychol 50(1):84–94, 2015; Henrie in Comput Educ 90:36–53, 2015). This study responded to this call by developing learning analytics to study the multifaceted aspects of engagement (i.e., group behavioral, social, cognitive, and metacognitive engagement) and its impact on collaborative learning. The results show that group behavioral engagement and group cognitive engagement have a significantly positive effect on group problem-solving performance; group social engagement has a significantly negative effect; the impact of group metacognitive engagement is not significant. Furthermore, group problem-solving performance has a significant positive effect on individual cognitive understanding, which partially mediates the impact of group behavioral engagement and fully mediates the impact of group social engagement on individual cognitive understanding. The findings have important implications for developing domain-specific learning analytics to measure students’ sub-constructs of engagement in CSCL.
    WOS© Citations 4Scopus© Citations 10  53  51
  • Publication
    Embargo
    Purpose and goal pursuit as a self‐sustaining system: Evidence of daily within‐person reciprocity among adolescents in self‐driven learning
    (Wiley, 2024)
    Ratner, Kaylin
    ;
    Gladstone, Jessica R.
    ;
    ;
    Li, Qingyi
    ;
    Estevez, Melody
    ;
    Burrow, Anthony L.
    Objective Despite long-standing assumptions that a sense of purpose in life and goal pursuit are mutually supportive, empirical evidence of their reciprocity remains deficient. In the context of a unique out-of-school time program that empowers youth to pursue passions through self-driven learning, we examined whether purpose and one aspect of goal pursuit—perceptions of goal progress—work together to sustain themselves and each other over time.
    Method
    Adolescents (N = 321) completed daily surveys throughout program enrollment (Menrollment = 69.09 days). Through dynamic structural equation modeling, we derived within-person patterns of day-to-day prediction as well as individual differences in these patterns.
    Results
    We found purpose and perceived goal progress exhibited significant daily inertia (i.e., autoregressive prediction) and reciprocity (i.e., cross-lagged prediction) at the within-person level. We also found initial evidence suggesting (a) tighter reciprocity was related to greater perceived goal progress overall and (b) people with greater purpose inertia may rely less on making goal progress to sustain momentum.
    Conclusions
    With evidence of daily purpose-progress reciprocity, the field can look forward to replicating this work in other contexts, diving deeper into interesting patterns of within-person dynamics, and developing interventions to support youth striving.
      15  25
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Evolution of the academic emotions of academically low-achieving students in knowledge building
    (2022)
    Yang, Yuqin
    ;
    ;
    Chan, Carol K. K.
    Knowledge Building is a pedagogical approach that emphasizes students’ collective responsibility to continuously improve their community knowledge. Advancing the frontiers of community knowledge is an exciting but challenging process, especially for low-achieving students, because it involves a continuous experience of cognitive disequilibrium and equilibrium. This knowledge generation process triggers various emotions (e.g., curiosity, surprise, and confusion) that may promote or hinder Knowledge Building. This study investigated the types and evolution of emotions experienced by academically low-achieving students in the Knowledge Building process supported by Knowledge Forum. The participants were 120 students from two Grade 9 classes and two Grade 11 classes in a Band 3 secondary school in Hong Kong. This school enrolls students performing at the 10th percentile on a pre-admission government examination at the end of elementary school. The participants built knowledge around Visual Arts. The emotions reflected in the digital Knowledge Forum notes and the evolution patterns of emotions in inquiry threads were both analyzed using content analysis and sequential pattern analysis. The participants demonstrated a high percentage of joy and relatively low percentages of frustration and boredom. Emotions were likely to maintain consistency (e.g., joy to joy) or transition between similar emotions (e.g., boredom to frustration) in the inquiry threads. By synthesizing the emotion transitions and subsequences manifested in the inquiry threads of different classes, we constructed a model of the evolution of emotions of academically low-achieving students during Knowledge Building. This model has implications for designing scaffolding or interventions to facilitate low-achieving students' learning and promote favorable emotions.
    WOS© Citations 3Scopus© Citations 5  36  11