Now showing 1 - 10 of 63
  • Publication
    Open Access
      150  928
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Four Indian love lyrics
    (2023) ;
    Ooi, Matthew Choong Hean
    ;
    Tan, Yi Ler
    ;
    Muhamad Yusri Mohamed Ali
      11  114
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Improvisation and issues of formal and informal learning: A perspective from Singapore
    (2008-07) ;
    Stead, Peter
    Our paper deals with improvisation and the degree to which expert or formalised knowledge helps or hinders free improvisation. In Lucy Green’s research on learning among musicians in popular culture, we note a similar lack of communication between formal training and the informal processes through which improvisational ability is acquired. Discussions on musical improvisation tend to concentrate on instrumental proficiency and musical conventions. However, as musical ability differs from culture to culture, so do expectations of musical improvisation. By studying the ways in which non-music specialists are enabled in musical improvisation, we aim to demonstrate the importance of informally acquired skill as well as discover processes that are common to those who are formally trained. This paper relies on a study conducted between July and October 2005 where a group of Physical Education teachers participated in an undergraduate course on improvisation. Research data were obtained from their journal entries and essays. Our findings yield five observations about improvisation and non- music specialist teachers. 1. Improvisational ability can be improved even for those who have had no formal musical training; 2. The improvising activities of nonmusic teachers reveal a considerable variety and diversity of formal and informal resources; 3. Non-music teachers’ views of and about music compare favourably with ethnomusicological views of Blacking and “inclusive” views of Schafer; 4.Enabling non-music specialist teachers has yielded a valuable and valid “informal” musical route to the teaching and learning of improvisation; 5. The teaching and learning of musical improvisation via informal processes has helped non-music specialist teachers towards self-enablement in their everyday lives. Besides underlining the importance of informal learning processes, enabling non-music specialists through musical improvisation challenges the privileging of “musical” skills in musical improvisation at the expense of the uniqueness of “individually informed” skill. A challenging question for music education is which of these skills should be given priority and privilege in the teaching and learning of musical improvisation, and to what extent curricula in music institutions can support both modes of learning?
      262  220
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Tannhäuser
    (2023) ;
    Ooi, Matthew Choong Hean
    ;
    Tan, Yi Ler
    ;
    Muhamad Yusri Mohamed Ali
      7  119
  • Publication
    Open Access
    50 years of song selection
    (2023) ;
    Ooi, Matthew Choong Hean
    ;
    Tan, Yi Ler
    ;
    Muhamad Yusri Mohamed Ali
      7  252
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Enforced spontaneity: Perspectives from non music-specialist tertiary students learning free improvisation in Singapore
    (2009-06) ;
    Stead, Peter
    Improvisation is a free elective course offered by the Music Department to students from all disciplines at the main University. Our earlier studies on the non music-specialist students enabled through improvisation have articulated in/formal processes in both reflexive and reflective thinking processes (Dairianathan & Stead 2006, 2008) which we argue are based on the concept of askesis, notably meletē and gymnasia, in the Stoic tradition (Foucault, 1988). Although improvising is based on prior experience, an area not yet critically examined is the way in which that experience is brought together with the immediate requirement to improvise in the moment. In this paper, we study one group of participants whose discussions brought about a consensus that, in their final performance: we would improvise on-the-spot on the performance day itself. In so doing, this group intentionally gave themselves minimal prior rehearsal; what these participants refer to as the in-the-moment (ITM) factor. This study is reliant on an analysis of participants’ performances and excerpts from their journal reflections which critically examine what it means for learners to be engaged in the moment when improvising.
      137  238
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Developing 21CC through band: An exploratory study of the “Four Cs”
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ; ; ;
    Tan, Jennifer Pei-Ling
    INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND In Singapore, the Ministry of Education (MOE) emphasises the importance of developing 21CC through Co-Curricular Activities (CCA). For example, the Handbook for the Co-Curriculum states that there ought to be an “intentional design” of CCA activities such that they create “authentic opportunities” for students to “practise” the 21CC (MOE, 2014, p. 16). This includes the development of 21CC through music CCAs, such as the school band.
    STATEMENT OF PROBLEMS Sentiments on the ground, however, suggest that many band directors see the development of these competencies already implicit in current practice. Furthermore, there is no research in Singapore that has empirically examined the assumption that 21CC can be developed through music CCAs. There appears a need for empirical data to determine if and how 21CC are being developed by school band programmes as currently practised. This would also render any form of formal intervention more organic, persuasive, and authentic.
    PURPOSE OF STUDY The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the development of 21CC through the school band; it aims to render explicit what might already be implicit in current practice. To achieve these goals, two high performing school bands (one Primary and one Secondary) were examined over a period of one year.
      384  17
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Selection from “Rigoletto”
    (2023) ;
    Ooi, Matthew Choong Hean
    ;
    Tan, Yi Ler
    ;
    Muhamad Yusri Mohamed Ali
      8  1452
  • Publication
    Open Access
      213  222