Now showing 1 - 10 of 38
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    Open Access
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    Developing 21CC through band: An exploratory study of the “Four Cs”
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ; ; ;
    Tan, Jennifer Pei-Ling
    INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND In Singapore, the Ministry of Education (MOE) emphasises the importance of developing 21CC through Co-Curricular Activities (CCA). For example, the Handbook for the Co-Curriculum states that there ought to be an “intentional design” of CCA activities such that they create “authentic opportunities” for students to “practise” the 21CC (MOE, 2014, p. 16). This includes the development of 21CC through music CCAs, such as the school band.
    STATEMENT OF PROBLEMS Sentiments on the ground, however, suggest that many band directors see the development of these competencies already implicit in current practice. Furthermore, there is no research in Singapore that has empirically examined the assumption that 21CC can be developed through music CCAs. There appears a need for empirical data to determine if and how 21CC are being developed by school band programmes as currently practised. This would also render any form of formal intervention more organic, persuasive, and authentic.
    PURPOSE OF STUDY The purpose of this exploratory study was to examine the development of 21CC through the school band; it aims to render explicit what might already be implicit in current practice. To achieve these goals, two high performing school bands (one Primary and one Secondary) were examined over a period of one year.
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  • Publication
    Open Access
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  • Publication
    Open Access
    Facilitating flow in band: Learning with joy in the 21st century
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2022) ; ; ;
    Leong, Wei Shin
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    Ee, Rachel
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    Chew, Winnie
      240  205
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    A comparative analysis of Hindemith's and Persichetti's band symphonies from a neoclassical perspective
    Paul Hindemith's Symphony In B flat for Band (1951) and Vincent Persichetti's Symphony No. 6 for Band (1956) are two of the most important works written for the wind band. Though they are commonly performed, scholarly interest in both works are limited, largely restricted to writers from the band community. In particular, the neoclassical elements of both works are largely undiscussed. Although they do not strictly belong to the neoclassical tradition, there are several neoclassical traits present in both works. This dissertation compares and contrasts both works, noting the neoclassical aspects of both works in the process. A range of analytical techniques will be drawn upon, including harmonic, voice-leading, motivic and formal analysis. Various compositional parameters - harmony, melody, form, orchestration and texture - will be analysed in detail, and the relationships between each of these parameters discussed. This study reveals that though both composers looked back to the past, their eventual musical products were distinctively different. Essentially, their differences stem from the fact that whilst Hindemith's neoclassical aesthetic leaning was very much of the Germanic tradition, Persichetti's showed influences of French Neoclassicism.
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  • Publication
    Open Access
    On practice, skill and competition: A pragmatist theory of action for instrumental music education
    Practice, skill and competition are important aspects of participating in school bands and orchestras. However, writers have questioned their value. In this philosophical paper, I mine the writings of the American pragmatists–in particular, their theories of habit and experience–to construct a theory of action for instrumental music education, that is, a proposed framework of active musical doing in large instrumental ensembles. It comprises two facets: effortful practice and effortless performance, and serves as lenses to address issues with respect to practice, skill and competition in instrumental music. Central to this paper is the thesis that the active doing of music in bands and orchestras enables students to encounter the aesthetic peak experience.
      127  256
  • Publication
    Open Access
    On the usefulness of nothingness: A Daoist-inspired philosophy of music education
    (2021)
    Lu, Mengchen
    ;
    In 1952, John Cage wrote 4′33″ which famously asked the performer not to play a single note: tacet. This provocative work raises a number of questions. In music—and by extension, music education—what does it mean to not do something? What does it mean to make no sound? More fundamentally, what is the nature of non-action, non-sound, and even nothingness in and of itself? Since Cage was influenced by Eastern philosophy, we journey to Asia in search of insights into nothingness and associated notions of absence and negation. In particular, we draw on the writings of Daoist philosophers, principally Laozi, to examine a quartet of philosophical terms, namely, wu (nothing/ness), wuwei (non-action), wusheng (non-sound), and wuaile (neither sorrow nor joy). Using these ideas, we propose a Daoist-inspired philosophy of music education, one that emphasizes the usefulness (yong) of nothingness (wu).
      103  93
  • Publication
    Embargo
    "Om": Singing Vedic philosophy for music education
    (2023)
    Aditi Gopinathan
    ;
    Extending a nascent line of Asian philosophical research in music education, we mine Indian philosophies of music and education. Three key questions guide our project: What are Vedic philosophies of music? What are Vedic philosophies of education? Taken together, what insights can we draw for contemporary music education writ large? To address our questions, we analyze key passages from the Upanishads and synthesize ideas from these texts. A quartet of inter-related ideas emerge from our analysis: the guru, the shishya, vidya, and moksha. In brief, the guru (teacher) is revered as one would god, for it is the teacher who leads the shishya (student) toward vidya (knowledge) and through that toward moksha (liberation of the soul), which can also be attained via making music, such as the singing of Om (the absolute sound). In addition to proffering insights for contemporary music education, particularly in terms of how the ancient Vedic guru-shishya parampara adds nuance to contemporary discussions on the master-apprentice model of music education, we imagine how music education philosophy might look like if it were to be sung.
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  • Publication
    Open Access
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