Now showing 1 - 10 of 15
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Scenarios for language teaching in context
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2018) ;
      48  49
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A study on a model of in situ professional development: Contexts, conditions and impact
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2022) ;
    Tay, Lee Yong
    ;
    Ho, Jeanne Marie Pau Yuen
    ;
    Goh, Sao-Ee
    ;
    ; ;
    Yap, Boon Chien
    ;
    Lau, Chor Yam
    ;
    Chew, Chong Kiat
    ;
    Kalaivani Ramachandran
    ;
    Jang, Hari
    ;
      116  100
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Understanding multiliteracies and assessing multimodal texts in the English curriculum
    (2017)
    Chan, Caroline May Ling
    ;
    ;
    The shift in multimodality and multiliteracies in the English curriculum has become more a need than a choice. With the advent of ‘new’ media and advancing technology, learning scopes have broadened significantly. Methodologies and pedagogies will have to be redefined and re-established to accommodate the over-flowing sources of accessible knowledge. The main issue is that schools and universities, as Hull and Nelson (2005) argued, are still “staunchly logocentric, book centered, and essay driven” (p.225). More than a decade after this assertion, these new forms of literacies appear to have some impact on teaching and learning. However, the inclusion of multimodal text analyses in school-based assessment seems to be lagging. This paper discusses the shift towards multimodality and multiliteracies and their possible impact and implications on the English curriculum. It proposes the alignment of a re-conceptualized English curriculum which infuses the teaching and learning of visuals and technology and the assessment of multimodal texts.
      638  1029
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Multiliteracies in the Singapore English Language classroom: Designing learning
    (National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (NIE NTU), Singapore, 2022) ; ; ;
    Tan-Chia, Lydia
    ;
    Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha
    ;
    Tan, Jia Min
    ;
    Peters, Charles Matthew
    ;
    Adams, Jonathon
    ;
    Towndrow, Phillip A. (Phillip Alexander)
    ;
    Unsworth, Len
    We report on the Phase 2 research activities and findings of the NIE/OER Educational Research Funding Programme and MOE CORE 3 project titled 'Integrating Multiliteracies into the English Language Classroom'. The project has two Phases: Phase 1 from March 2019 to December 2019 and Phase 2 from January 2020 to December 2021.

    The purpose of this project is first to understand how multiliteracies, specifically multimodal literacy, are currently taught in the English Language subject classroom in Singapore schools and then second, to develop an instructional approach, informed by Systemic Functional Theory, multiliteracies, and multimodality studies, to teach multimodal literacy for upper primary and lower secondary students.

    The study adopts a design-based research approach which involved the team of researchers working closely with the teacher-participants in the co-design of lesson packages. The goal of design-based research is to develop contextually-sensitive pedagogical practices and instructional strategies with a focus on the teacherparticipants’ professional learning and growth in the process.
      1579  916
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Teaching Science amidst curriculum reform : Singapore teacher accounts of pedagogical practice
    This study is an explorative and descriptive investigation of how three teachers account for their pedagogical practices when enacting the Lower Secondary Science (LSS) Syllabus and the extent to which these accounts are made visible in their classrooms. Taking a socio-cultural perspective, this study is underpinned by two theoretical concepts – ‘pedagogical practice’ (Baker & Johnson, 1998; Freiberg & Freebody, 1995) and ‘layers of mediation’ (Luke, 2005a). The specific questions driving my study are as follows:

    In the light of the recent changes in the Singapore science curriculum,
    1. how do teachers account for their pedagogical practices in the lower secondary science classroom? and
    2. to what extent are their accounts made visible in their classroom instruction?

    These questions have been answered by interviewing, and observing the lessons of, three lower secondary science teachers in a government school. The accounts provided in the interviews and the interactions observed in the lessons are subjected to fine-grained qualitative analyses. For the investigation of the science teachers’ accounts, this study employed the analytical approach of Membership Categorization Analysis (MCA) – a branch of Ethnomethodology (Freebody, 2003; Freiberg and Freebody, 1995; Gunn, Forrest and Freebody, 1995). In line with Freiberg and Freebody’s (1995) framework, the teachers’ accounts were used as an essential backdrop for reading and analyzing the transcripts of their science lessons. The latter were examined for their production of what counts as scientific knowledge and practices in the teachers’ classroom. Hence, features of the lesson talk like exchange structure and nature of teacher questions were analyzed. The detailed analyses of the interview talk and classroom interaction transcripts surfaced a number of issues of broader relevance surrounding the challenges of curricular reform. Many of these issues confirm the findings from past research studies, others have expanded and deepened current understandings of the issues.

    The findings have been organized into the broad themes derived from the bringing together of common and related categories and their accompanying attributes evoked in the teachers’ accounts of their pedagogical practice. The themes which have been assembled are ‘The Neighbourhood School Student’, ‘Institutional and Systemic Factors’ and ‘Teacher Habitus’. The findings suggest that a divide exists between ‘neighbourhood schools’ and ‘top schools’ – heard largely through the teachers’ attributions accorded to the students which attend them. The ‘neighbourhood school student’ is constructed as unmotivated and lacking in skills necessary to cope with 21st Century schooling; the ‘top school’ student is described as motivated, independent, self-directed and possessing the relevant skills to deal with the demands of school. These contrastive attributions were then employed by the teachers to justify the employment of different ways of instructing these sets of students. These claims were visible in the interaction patterns they employed in their classroom lessons.

    Another recurring theme, which emerged from the interviews, is that of institutional and systemic factors – high‐stakes examinations, time constraints, curricular factors – which come to bear on the teachers’ enactment of the LSS Syllabus. These perceived pressures are seen to pull the teachers in different directions. The influence of these pressures was evident again in the teachers’ choice of pedagogical actions in their classroom lessons. They continued to perpetuate rather traditional ways of teaching (e.g. whole class monologic lecture, closed IRE questioning), which run contrary to the LSS Syllabus aims of promoting an inquiry-based curriculum.

    The assembly of individual histories of the science teachers – from home, to school and university, through teacher training – was organized under the theme of ‘Teacher Habitus’. The findings from the analysis of their accounts reveal how their past experiences with science are able to shed light on their current beliefs and assumptions about science teaching, and these are seen to impact upon the current activity structures and interaction patterns in their classrooms.

    The study concludes that teachers cannot successfully enact an inquiry-based curriculum if they do not change the discourse patterns in their classrooms. However, even if they are willing to do so, it is likely that they will adapt them to their familiar patterns of interacting, given the entrenched nature of these patterns, and the knowledge and values embedded within them.
      403  58
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Managing learners and learning in a digital environment

    Digital Learning Environments (DLE) is a space that brings together the teacher, learner and technology tools with the intention of creating a technology-mediated milieu to support effective teaching and learning. The drive to adopt technology-mediated learning in the institutions makes it pertinent that educators are aware of how to manage a DLE so that, despite the shift in modality, the focus remains on learnings.

    This chapter will explore two DLEs – Technology-mediated Learning Environment and Virtual Classrooms (VC). For each of these, we will discuss how teachers can set expectations and procedures to maintain their learners’ focus on learning while creating a safe and positive classroom culture.

      45
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Multiliteracies in the Singapore English language classroom: Perceptions and practices.
    (2020) ; ; ;
    Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha
    ;
    Tan, Jia Min
    ;
    Adams, Jonathon
    ;
    Tan-Chia, Lydia
    ;
    Peters, Charles Matthew
    ;
    Towndrow, Phillip A. (Phillip Alexander)
    ;
    Unsworth, Len
      814  1662
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Facilitating HBL: Ideas and principles
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2021)
      38  63
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Gendered differences and school literacy
    Recent research on literacy and schooling has focused on the need for further inquiry into the role gender plays in shaping children's attitudes and their participation in literacy practices at school. While there exists a body of research that asserts that boys and girls acquire literacy differently and hence become differently literate, much of the work has been done in countries like Australia, Britain, Canada and the US. Little is known about the Singapore school context. this research study attempts to fill this gap by investigating and analyzing the reading and writing preferences of a group of Singapore school children for gender differences.

    The research was carried out with two classes of Secondary Three Express Stream pupils from a local secondary school; and the methodology to uncover gender differences involved a survey on the pupils' reading preferences, group interviews and analyses of examination documents and stories written by the pupils.

    The findings indicated that the boys and girls had markedly different reading preferences and produced significantly different stories. For example, the girls who were seen to read much more than the boys were found to have very different tastes in the kinds of subject areas that they chose to read. Many of the narratives that were written by the girls were perceived to be superior to the boys' because they often contained single Complications and the building up of characters and their psychological make-up - i.e. features found to be highly valued by teachers and UCLES examiners. Very few of the boys' narratives displayed these features. In its conclusion, this dissertation also examined claims of the possible links between reading and writing. These links, together with the gendered differences uncovered, were found to have significant bearing on school literacy and performance, especially in subject English.
      180  28
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Singapore's student-centred, values-driven education system
    (Routledge, 2022) ; ;
    Tay, Lee Yong
    ;
    Lee, Jaekyung
    ;
    Wong, Kenneth K.
    The “Student-centred, Values-driven” vision, articulated in 2011, marked a significant shift in the Singapore education system to a heightened emphasis on values, social emotional competencies, character development at the center of students’ educational experiences, and whole-child development. This vision embraces a “broad and inclusive” approach to education and a desire to support all students to succeed and achieve their fullest potential. This chapter describes key developments which accompanied the Student-centred, Values-driven vision with a particular emphasis on how teacher professional learning needed to be re-positioned in order to complement the vision. The chapter describes how Morgan School—one of four publicly-funded specialized independent schools set up to cater to students’ different aspirations—designed conditions for a school-based learning approach. Narratives from Morgan School describe the complexity and nuances between the school’s and teachers’ understandings of conditions that support professional learning. Based on lessons learned from Morgan School, the chapter postulates that the Student-centred, Values-driven vision has created a social-cultural environment in schools that drives professional learning by nurturing community building, strengthening teacher leaders, and promoting teacher agency and partnerships toward the goal of whole-child development.
      165