Now showing 1 - 3 of 3
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Investigating the effects of microclimate on physiological stress and brain function with data science and wearables
    (2022) ;
    Nguyen, Duc Minh Anh
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    Nguyen, Thien Minh Tuan
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    This paper reports a study conducted by students as an independent research project under the mentorship of a research scientist at the National Institute of Education, Singapore. The aim of the study was to explore the relationships between local environmental stressors and physiological responses from the perspective of citizen science. Starting from July 2021, data from EEG headsets were complemented by those obtained from smartwatches (namely heart rate and its variability and body temperature and stress score). Identical units of a wearable device containing environmental sensors (such as ambient temperature, air pressure, infrared radiation, and relative humidity) were designed and worn, respectively, by five adolescents for the same period. More than 100,000 data points of different types—neurological, physiological, and environmental—were eventually collected and were processed through a random forest regression model and deep learning models. The results showed that the most influential microclimatic factors on the biometric indicators were noise and the concentrations of carbon dioxide and dust. Subsequently, more complex inferences were made from the Shapley value interpretation of the regression models. Such findings suggest implications for the design of living conditions with respect to the interaction of the microclimate and human health and comfort.
    WOS© Citations 1Scopus© Citations 1  265  63
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group 12-week pilot phase II trial of SaiLuoTong (SLT) for cognitive function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment
    (Wiley, 2023)
    Steiner-Lim, Genevieve Z.
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    Bensoussan, Alan
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    Andrews-Marney, Elana R.
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    Mahmoud A. Al-Dabbas
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    Cave, Adele E.
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    Chiu, Christine L.
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    Christofides, Katerina
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    De Blasio, Frances M.
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    Dewsbury, Lauren S.
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    Fagan, Naomi L.
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    Hattom, Lena C.
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    Hohenberg, Mark I.
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    Jafar, D.
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    Karamacoska, Diana
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    Lim, Chai K.
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    Liu, Jianxun
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    Metri, Najwa-Joelle
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    Oxenham, D. Vincent
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    Ratajec, Holly
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    Roy, Nikita
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    Shipton, Danielle G.
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    Varjabedian, David
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    Chang, Dennis H.
    INTRODUCTION This study primarily aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of SaiLuoTong (SLT) on cognition in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). METHODS Community-dwelling people with MCI aged ≥60 years were randomly assigned to 180 mg/day SLT or placebo for 12 weeks. RESULTS Thirty-nine participants were randomized to each group (N = 78); 65 were included in the final analysis. After 12 weeks, the between-groups difference in Logical Memory delayed recall scores was 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.22 to 2.58; P = 0.010); Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System Trail Making Test Condition 4 switching and contrast scaled scores were 1.42 (95% CI: –0.15 to 2.99; P = 0.038) and 1.56 (95% CI: –0.09 to 3.20; P = 0.032), respectively; Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test delayed recall was 1.37 (95% CI: –0.10 to 2.84; P = 0.034); and Functional Activities Questionnaire was 1.21 (95% CI: –0.21 to 2.63; P = 0.047; P < 0.001 after controlling for baseline scores). DISCUSSION SLT is well tolerated and may be useful in supporting aspects of memory retrieval and executive function in people with MCI. Highlights SaiLuoTong (SLT) improves delayed memory retrieval and executive function in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). SLT is well tolerated in people ≥ 60 years. The sample of community dwellers with MCI was well characterized and homogeneous.
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  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Auditory equiprobable NoGo P3: A single-trial latency-adjusted ERP analysis
    (2022) ;
    Barry, Robert J.
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    Steiner-Lim, Genevieve Z.
    The NoGo P3 event-related potential (ERP) component is often related to response inhibition, although its function in equiprobable Go/NoGo tasks is debated. Previous findings concerning the auditory equiprobable NoGo P3 (or P3a) could be distorted by averaging latency-variable ERP components. This study aimed to control NoGo P3 latency jitter to investigate the component's relationship with inhibitory demands and its neuronal sources across trials. P3 latency jitter was controlled using a novel procedure to enable single-trial P3 quantification across 126 healthy young adults (Mage = 20.3, SD = 2.8 years) using principal components analysis. NoGo inhibitory demands and performance were measured using the Lateralised Readiness Potential and error rates, respectively. The stimulus-locked P3 (SL-P3) was also analysed to assess the ‘blurring effect’ (i.e., smearing) associated with averaging latency-variable ERP trial data. A Spearman's rank correlation across 4700 NoGo trials demonstrated that the relationship between latency-adjusted P3 (LA-P3) and inhibitory demands was inconsequential. The cortical sources associated with LA-P3, using eLORETA, were in the premotor and prefrontal cortices, cingulate, and precuneus. SL-P3 was smaller than LA-P3, and that difference was positively related to P3 latency jitter; its source solution was also limited to lower activation in the prefrontal cortex. SL-P3 was not related to inhibitory demands or performance. This study indicates that NoGo P3 should not index response inhibition in auditory equiprobable tasks. Instead, the findings support a neuroinhibition account relating NoGo P3 to attention. Blurring effects were also shown to impact a standard ERP measure and its source solution, encouraging ERP latency-adjustment in future research.
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