Now showing 1 - 10 of 16
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Learning physics: The “Play-N-Learn” approach
    (2006-11) ;
    Yau, Che Ming
    The science curriculum in Singapore promotes innovation in teaching and learning to encourage children to develop curiosity and the spirit of inquiry. It hopes to build the development of thinking and reflection into the everyday classroom processes and sets to understand the complexities and relate learning to application and alternatives. The end goal is pupils who enjoy and value science. In the area of physics, pupils find it difficult to enjoy and appreciate the subject because they are intimidated by the terminologies, calculations and concepts that require higher- order thinking. Teachers are always looking for new ways to make physics more appealing to the pupils. Past research has shown that when pupils play with concrete models and toys, it arouses curiosity and interest because it is a fun learning experience. Curricula in early childhood education programs throughout the world are built around play because young children respond very well to it and play has shown to contribute to the many aspects of a child’s psychological development. If the level of difficulty of the play activities is raised for older pupils, will play still be a stimulant for their learning and will the learning be effective? Will the pupils respond well to play or find the play experience too childish? These are some of the questions and concerns that have been addressed in the study. This paper reveals how the “play-n-learn” approach was implemented on a group of secondary three pure physics pupils and their response to the experience.
      123  30
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Influencing factors for secondary one students’ engagement in physics lessons, educational and career aspirations and the implications
    (2011)
    Loganantham Kuppan
    ;
    ;
    Foong, See Kit
    ;
    Yeung, Alexander Seeshing
    This paper reports on crucial factors that could influence students’ learning of Physics at three different stages of their lives: 1) lower secondary school, 2) post-secondary school or tertiary education, and 3) career. A sample of 275 secondary 1 students in a school in Singapore responded to several survey items on a six-point scale (from disagree strongly to agree strongly). The factors derived from the survey items include students’ interest, self-efficacy, competence, and parents’ expectations as internal and external factors, which may influence outcomes such as engagement, future educational aspiration, and career aspiration in physics. By determining the influencing factors and the seriousness of the implications, educators and parents could play their role effectively in cultivating the necessary characteristics in students for their optimum benefit.
      275  249
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Value and challenges in using a collaborative critical reading and learning analytics system: A cross-case analysis of two high schools
    (International Society of the Learning Sciences, Inc., 2023) ;
    Jonathan, Christin
    ;
    ; ;
    Tan, Jennifer Pei-Ling
    WiREAD+ is an augmented web-based collaborative critical reading and learning analytics environment that was developed to scaffold and engage students in collaborative dialogue around online texts. This paper reports on the trial of WiREAD+ for Grade 9 students in two high schools – School 1 (S1) with prior experience and School 2 (S2) that was new to the intervention design. We report on a cross-case analysis of the two schools, focusing on perceived ease of use and usefulness for learning, and reflect on the value and challenges of enacting WiREAD+ across schools of varying prior experience. Drawing from the findings of this cross-case analysis, we consider how we can support the wider adoption and deployment of the system across schools and settings by highlighting obstacles that new participants who might trial such new learning analytics systems might face.
      12  420
  • Publication
    Embargo
    The effects of load reduction instruction on educational outcomes: An intervention study on hands-on inquiry-based learning in science
    (2023) ;
    Yeung, Alexander Seeshing
    ;
    ;
    Diallo, Thierno M. O.
    ;
    Forbes, Anne
    ;
    Koh, Wei Xun
    Load reduction instruction (LRI) is an instructional approach designed to manage the cognitive load on students as they learn complex learning materials. According to Cognitive Load Theory, complex learning is associated with high cognitive load and when not effectively managed, could impede learning. Inquiry-based learning with hands-on component, where students conduct experiments to find solutions to problems, are known to incur high cognitive load. In this study, we examined the effects on students' educational outcomes when the five key principles of the LRI framework were implemented to reduce the cognitive load of inquiry-based learning with hands-on involvement. Multiple regression analysis was used to compare the educational outcomes of the intervention and control groups. The control group also experienced hands-on inquiry-based learning, but without LRI. Results showed that students in the intervention group had better outcomes, indicating the effectiveness of LRI in managing the high cognitive load of complex instruction.
      131  3
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Navigating challenges during COVID-19 pandemic: Experiences and coping strategies of Singapore students
    (2022) ; ; ;
    Chua, Jenny
    ;
    Nur Qamarina Ilham
    Objectives This study explores the experiences and coping strategies of secondary students as they engaged in learning activities during the pandemic. It investigated the sources of student stress during the pandemic, and the extent to which the pandemic influenced the stress that they usually experience. Method Semi-structured interviews were used to elicit details of the students’ lived experiences as they navigated learning via an online platform, their coping strategies in managing stress. Results With regards to academic experiences, many students found online learning challenging and ineffective and were concerned about their examinations. Under social experiences, many students shared that they missed social and recreational activities during the “circuit breaker”. However, some students demonstrated resilience and were able to see the benefits of going through the pandemic. More students reported academic-related than social-related stress. The students coped with stress in three ways: (1) disengagement, (2) taking active steps and (3) turning to others. Conclusion Academic concerns were a major source of distress among adolescents. Insights that were drawn from the results of the study can be utilized to support students in managing stress and mitigate its adverse effects on student learning and functioning. KEY POINTS What is already known about this topic: (1) The pandemic has a more serious impact on adolescents’ mental health and emotional well-being and many adolescents experience anxiety during this period. (2) Positive reappraisal, strengths use and emotional processing are some strategies used by adolescents to cope with stress during the pandemic. What this topic adds: (1) Although many students found online learning stressful and ineffective, some students in this study had meaningful and positive experiences during the period when they had online lessons at home. (2) Despite the challenges, some students demonstrated resilience and were even able to see the benefits arising from going through the pandemic. Others appreciated spending more time with their family members. (3) Adolescents coped with stress experienced during the pandemic in three ways: (1) disengagement, (2) taking active steps and (3) turning to others.
    WOS© Citations 2Scopus© Citations 3  457  139
  • Publication
    Open Access
    PBI1@SCHOOL: Developing and implementing an inquiry-based curriculum for speed and density
    (2011)
    Lau, Chor Yam
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    Foong, See Kit
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    ;
    Wong, Darren Jon Sien
    Physics by Inquiry (PbI) by the Physics Education Group at the University of Washington is a research-validated self-contained, laboratory-based curriculum designed to help teachers teach physics in a way that engages students in the process of science. But could the success of the PbI curriculum and approach for teacher reparation be transferred to effective learning of physics for the secondary students in our local context? This paper describes our attempt to do so in the research project PbI1@School. It outlines the development and trial implementation of a guided inquiry curriculum and approach adapted from PbI for delivering lessons on Speed and Density in the secondary one science classroom in Singapore. The 3-year project to be done in three phases take into account factors such as the existing syllabus content, the availability of time, identified student learning difficulties from specially-designed pre-tests, students’ and teachers’ experiences in learning and teaching by inquiry, and school resources. The paper also discusses the challenges and modifications made to the pilot curriculum package to support the research site school’s effort to implement the curriculum package for all its 11 secondary one classes with about 440 students.
      208  137
  • Publication
    Restricted
    A study of students' perceptions and performance in a "play-n-learn" physics workshop
    Studies of students’ perceptions and performance using the play-n-learn methods in Physics education are extremely scarce.

    Research done on the effects of play on learning were mostly done on younger children below ten years of age. Studies have shown that play do have a significant role in the mental development and learning skills of a young child. Does play still have its benefits to learning when it comes to older, teenaged students?

    This study was undertaken to examine secondary three students’ perceptions and performance in a play-n-learn physics workshop. The workshop employed play-nlearn strategies in the learning of Physics. The objectives of this study are to explore

    (i) whether play experience in using hands-on kits enhances learning,
    (ii) whether structured and free play promotes the acquisition of some Physics concepts,
    (iii) gender differences in response to the play-n-learn workshop, and
    (iv) the differences in the performance of high, middle and low ability students after experiencing the play-n-learn workshop.

    The study employs the descriptive method of research and uses a survey approach to collect the data.

    Questionnaires were distributed to a sample of 100 secondary three students in the express stream who read Pure Physics in the secondary school curriculum. A pre- play questionnaire was distributed to them before they experienced a two- hour play-n-learn workshop where they were given free and structured play experiences. A post-play questionnaire was given at the end of the workshop experience.

    The research instruments explored the following areas:

    ● Content knowledge of physics concepts on four topics (both pre and post play);
    ● Students’ perceptions of the play-n- learn workshop experience (post play) which included motivational input from play towards the learning of physics.

    The response of the surveys came from the entire sample population of 100 students. This comprises 31% of the secondary three student population – that is, 7% of the total student population in the school.

    The main results of the investigations show that the students felt that learning physics through the play-n-learn workshop was fun and interesting and that they learned easily by playing with hands-on kits. They enjoyed playing in groups and preferred learning physics through the play-n-learn workshop than just theory lessons. The students also mentioned that they preferred structured play to free play because they learnt better when they have worksheets to guide them through the learning processes of the play activities.

    The video footages taken of the workshop clearly showed the students’ excitement and joy as they explored the play kits. There were many constructive discussions going on among them as they figured out the physics concepts behind the play. The students looked relaxed and there was much laughter heard during the workshop.

    An analysis of the performance of the students also looks promising, with 85% of the students getting more marks in their physics MCQ test after experiencing the play- n-learn workshop.

    The results of this study has provided interesting insights into the way in which secondary school students respond to play and made us educators understand one of the settings in which they enjoyed learning and acquiring Physics concepts.

    It is hoped the results obtained in this study, the resultant concepts drawn and recommendations proposed will be useful to MOE curriculum planners, Physics teachers and researchers in education.
      310  15
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Examining well-being, interest, school engagement, and life stressors of at-risk children
    (2022) ;
    Lim, Aaron
    Despite extensive research on vulnerable children and youths in school (commonly known as students at-risk) little has been done to uncover the stressors, wellbeing, interests, and school engagement of these students within the primary school level (aged 7 to 12). This study examined different domains across these constructs to develop a profile of at-risk primary school students. A total of 343 at-risk and non-at-risk students aged 10 to 12 years old were recruited from a Singapore primary school to complete online survey questionnaires. Quantitative results showed lower levels of emotional wellbeing and physical health, as well as higher levels of frustration in several constructs of psychological needs and school engagement in the at-risk group. Interestingly, these students reported better social wellbeing, especially in teacher relationships. These findings can be triangulated alongside responses in the structured interviews to create a profile that can guide the design and development of suitable at-risk programs to help the struggling at-risk students.
      77  74
  • Publication
    Embargo
    Self-concept a game changer for academic success for high-achieving Australian Indigenous and non-Indigenous students: Reciprocal effects between self-concept and achievement
    (2023)
    Marsh, Herbert W.
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    Craven, Rhonda G.
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    Yeung, Alexander Seeshing
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    Mooney, Janet
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    Franklin, Alicia
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    Dillon, Anthony
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    Barclay, Lily
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    van Westenbrugge, Annalies
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    Vasconcellos, Diego
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    See, Sioau-Mai
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    Roy, Douglas
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    ;
    Durmush, Georgia
    Indigenous Australians are highly disadvantaged educationally and on all socioeconomic indicators, but graduating from university largely closes this gap. However, despite clear examples of Indigenous success, little research has focused on the drivers of success of high-achieving Indigenous students to emulate their success. Thus, the explicit purpose of our study is to identify psychological drivers of Indigenous academic success for high-achieving students and compare these to those of high-achieving nonIndigenous students. To accomplish this purpose, we test the reciprocal effects model (REM) of self-concept and achievement for high-achieving Indigenous students (N = 493) and matched nonIndigenous students (N = 586) in primary and secondary schools. Academic achievement and self-concept were reciprocally related over three annual time waves, supporting the REM for high-achieving Indigenous and nonIndigenous students. Furthermore, results were invariant over two within-person facets (time and content-domain—math vs. English) and two between-person facets (Indigenous vs. nonIndigenous, and primary vs. secondary students). The results have important policy/practice implications for the drivers of success for high-achieving Indigenous students, education of high-achieving students more generally, and self-concept theory and research.
    WOS© Citations 1Scopus© Citations 1  47
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Towards the scalability readiness of WiREAD+
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2022) ;
    Jonathan, Christin
    ;
    ; ;
    Tay, Siu Hua
      80  93