Now showing 1 - 10 of 17
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Use of comics in teaching mathematics
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2018) ; ; ;
      137  269
  • Publication
    Open Access
      172  570
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Reconstructing differences in lesson study: Shaping teachers’ beliefs about teaching culturally diverse students in Singapore
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ;
    Lee, Christine Kim-eng
    ;
    The urgency of teaching diverse learners is aptly demonstrated in many parts of the world as the ethnic, racial, class, and linguistic diversity grows rapidly. Such diversity not only brings about opportunities for creative teaching, but also challenges for ensuring educational equity and providing high-quality teaching for all students from diverse backgrounds, especially those presently underserved by the educational system (Buehl, & Beck, 2014; Civitillo, Juang, & Schachner, 2018). Researchers have found that teachers prepared for working with students from diverse cultural backgrounds need to embrace beliefs that recognize the strengths of cultural diversity (Anagnostopoulos, 2006; Banks et al., 2005; Fives & Buehl, 2014; Gay, 2010). Thus, exploring and challenging teachers’ beliefs about cultural diversity should constitute a major objective in teacher professional learning. However, only a few studies have examined how in-service teachers’ beliefs are enacted and shaped in professional learning community practices (Little, 2003; Tam, 2015; Turner, 2011), and focused even less on teachers’ beliefs about cultural diversity (Pang, 2005; Sleeter, 1992). There are a few studies examining teachers’ cultural beliefs about diversity in Singapore, and found that Singaporean teachers are influenced by prevailing political ideologies, and have ambiguous perceptions towards students from less advantaged backgrounds (Anderson, 2015; Alviar-Martin & Ho, 2011; Dixon & Liang, 2009; Ho & Alviar-Martin, 2010; Ho et al., 2014; Lim & Tan, 2018). However, these studies discussed teachers’ individual perceptions of disadvantaged learners without further exploring how these perceptions are mediated by influences from professional development practices, where teachers’ cultural beliefs about diversity issues are in (inter)action as ideas emerge, clash, change, and (dis)agree with each other when teachers work together.
      116  5
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Teacher learning with classroom assessment in Singapore primary schools
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2022) ;
    Tan, Liang See
    ;
    Lam, Karen
    ;
    Chia, Terence Titus Song An
    ;
    Malathy Krishnasamy
    ;
    Ria George
      63  40
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Introduction
      124  139
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Learning to teach low-SES (socioeconomic status) pupils through assessment in China
    (2012-04)
    This case study describes for one rural school in China how pre-service teachers perceived their rural students and how they learned to focus on the test-related activities through the collaborative work with their intern colleagues and mentors. As this study explains, pre-service teachers learned from their mentors and support each other in learning to teach. I find that such professional collaboration sometimes promote teachers learning how to work with lower achieving students more effectively and offer them more cognitively demanding knowledge. This is referred to as “teaching through assessment”. Yet, some pre-service teachers in this study support each other in becoming more skilled in “teaching for assessment”, as well as in explicitly distinguishing between higher achieving and lower achieving students.
      191  136
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Use of comics to enhance students’ learning for the development of the 21st century competencies in the mathematics classroom
    This paper discusses the use of comics in teaching mathematics in the secondary mathematics classroom. We explicate how the use of comics in teaching mathematics can prepare students for the twenty-first century competencies. We developed an alternative teaching package using comics for two lower secondary mathematics topics. This alternative teaching package consists of (i) several sets of comic strips expounding all related mathematical concepts in a lively way; (ii) tiered practice questions for learning reinforcement; and (iii) a set of proposed lesson outlines with suggestions on how to use the comics for mathematics teaching. We also report how one of the teachers in our study used this teaching package in her mathematics lessons. Her lessons were video-recorded and eleven students were interviewed to help us understand how the mathematics comics lessons were enacted and the students’ perception of comics as instruction. We identified instances in which the teacher tweaked the provided resource to further enhance student learning and incorporated elements of the twenty-first century competencies during her lessons. Through selected student interviews, we also identified instances in which students commented on their gain from the new approach from the perspective of the twenty-first century competencies.
    WOS© Citations 8Scopus© Citations 24  215  1587
  • Publication
    Open Access
      125  149
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A Chinese learner and her self-regulated learning: An autoethnography
    In this paper, I use an autoethnographical approach, coupled with existing research literature on Chinese learners and learning, to reflect upon my own experiences as a junior high school student in order to explore how Chinese students perceive their learning, and how they establish and justify their own sense of self-regulation in learning. I examine how self-regulation is interpreted in Western literature about learning, and how my learning experiences can provide a window to rethink self-regulated learning and learners from an indigenous Chinese perspective.
      136  28
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Observation on teacher quality: Critical analysis on observational instruments in pre-service teacher performance assessment
    (2014)
    Caughlan, S.
    ;
    Teacher preparation programs commonly use observational instruments to assess the progress and the exit performances of teacher candidates. However, while these instruments have been described and several have been studied for effectiveness, the field lacks a close examination of how they position participants: teacher candidates, K-12 pupils, and teacher educators. This paper closely examines three classroom observation instruments used in preservice programs. We use critical discourse analysis and systemic-functional linguistics to examine how the grammar of these instruments assigns agency and positions participants as teachers and learners, and define their larger discourses of professionalism and accountability. We argue that instruments differ in the extent to which they grant participants agency, thus influencing the assumed pedagogical relations among the teacher educator, teacher candidate, and K-12 pupils. Instruments are not neutral, but reflect the values of the programs that use them, inflected by often contradictory discourses of teacher and student learning.
    WOS© Citations 30Scopus© Citations 38  187  1058