Now showing 1 - 10 of 24
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Holistic counselling of gifted adolescents in Singapore
    (1998-11)
    Intellectually gifted pupils in Singapore are blessed with supportive parents who are constantly concerned with their development and attainment. In addition, the Gifted Education Branch of the Ministry of Education has provided these pupils with an enriched and challenging curriculum. Nevertheless, individual differences among the gifted are of such a wide range that individual attention needs to be given to the pupils in the form of guidance and counselling in times of stress. Counselling gifted adolescents in this study took the form of a holistic approach of first identifying a possible lack of development in the four areas of heart, body, mind and soul; followed by individualised prescription for self-knowledge and volition for personal development. Counselling vignettes of gifted pupils in the secondary schools are featured in this study.
      162  203
  • Publication
    Open Access
      306  2535
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The relationship between perception and academic achievement of teenage pupils in the Gifted Education Programme (GEP) in Singapore
    (1996-11) ;
    Quah, May Ling
    This study hypothesizes that intellectually gifted adolescents in the Gifted Education Programme (GEP) in Singapore who had greater preference for perception would tend to perform less well academically owing to an inability to focus and a tendency to be easily distracted by elements in the classroom environment. Subjects were all secondary one GEP pupils in three independent schools (N=239). Academic performance was captured in terms of overall end-of-year examination results. Results of linear regression indicate a significant but negative correlation between academic achievement and perception scores. Implications of the study, together with contributions from teachers of the subjects, are discussed with respect to the perceptive trait of the gifted pupils.
      265  381
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Pedagogical change for training teachers: Adapted flipped classroom approach
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ;
    Quek, Khiok Seng
    This pilot quasi-experimental project examines the effectiveness of an adapted flipped classroom approach for the teaching of 2 teacher education courses over a semester of 13 weeks. Both the experimental and control groups would be matched at programme level. The control group would be two comparable classes not using the flipped classroom approach but using the didactic or traditional approach of teaching. The flipped classroom approach is also known as the Thayer Method or the inverted classroom or reverse teaching. It involves interactive student-centred engagement pedagogy with individualised online learning before the course. In the adapted flipped classroom, additional guiding questions and power-point slides would be deployed. Students learn content online through e-worksheets and guided discovery before face-to-face classroom time. Students worked through activities, watched videos, navigate websites, read up on articles and answered questions posed to them in the lesson worksheets. In class, students would share their prior learning with each other and they would be encouraged to ask questions of each other and with the tutor. Concepts, theories, controversies and ambiguities will be discussed with the aid of power-point slides. The students in the control group would receive lectures through power-point slides during class time, and learning activities would be conducted. Students in the control group would have no pre-lesson learning activities. The effectiveness of the flipped classroom lessons will be assessed through newly developed surveys, focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews of participants in the experimental and control groups. Results will be analysed using paired sample t tests, ANCOVA and thematic analyses. Findings will enable the lecturers to review and re-design the flipped classroom lessons and thus make evidence based pedagogical changes for the following semester.
      142  27
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Designing wellbeing: The role of design in developing open-mindedness in mental health
    (2020)
    Yeo, Jesvin Puay Hwa
    ;
    According to the World Health Organization, mental disorders are among the leading causes of disability-adjusted life years worldwide. Approximately one in four adults has experienced mental disorders at some point during his or her lifetime. Due to the misconceptions of the illness and its invisible psychological nature, people experiencing mental disorders may not seek help. While psychologists investigate the cause and effect of mental illness to provide treatments, graphic designers may contribute to improving the present mental health situation through a call for open-mindedness. Using the Strategies of Inquiry design research approach developed by Richard Buchanan (2007) that explores the human experience, a role-playing technique was engaged with twelve undergraduate students to explore mental disorders and search for unifying ideas in the design process. Then, creative action, practical thinking, and function, form and materials were investigated to understand how graphic design can encourage: (i) users with mental disorders to become more open-minded towards support services, (ii) society to be more empathetic and accepting of people with mental illness for who they are, and (iii) designers to approach healthcare design with open-mindedness. The initial findings of the project indicated that design has a potential role in the call for open-mindedness in the area of mental health and wellbeing, as graphic design can effectively communicate complex information and issues in meaningful ways. Nevertheless, the absence of actual patients or service users as participants in the study requires a cautious interpretation of results. On this basis, further research is recommended to understand critical factors that could strengthen the association between creativity, design process, mental health patients and service users, as well as the distribution and evolution of design objects.
      1043  559
  • Publication
    Open Access
      77  225
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Primary teachers' attributes and attitudes in Singapore
    (2003) ;
    Ee, Jessie
    Teachers are important elements in the life of young children as they are facilitators of learning, counsellors of student problems and gardeners of growth and development. This study examines the attributes and attitudes of in-service teachers in primary schools with respect to current educational policies and new initiatives. Three samples of teachers in the study include teachers teaching children with special needs, teachers in the mainstream classrooms and teachers teaching intellectually gifted pupils. Attributes examined include self-reported virtues of truthfulness, peacefulness, a sense of justice, trustworthiness, care and love for pupils, a forgiving nature and service-orientation. Attitudes documented include optimism, a willingness to learn, an understanding of talents and their development and ability to adjust to the Ministry of Education (MOE) initiatives. Results of the study will inform teacher educators and the MOE in making better decisions on teacher selection and training required to attain the desired outcomes of education.
      170  1546
  • Publication
    Open Access
      130  189