Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10497/22146
Title: 
Authors: 
Keywords: 
Developmental language disorder
Emotion recognition
Language development
Facial expression
Vocal expression
Longitudinal cohort study
Issue Date: 
2020
Citation: 
Griffiths, S., Goh, S. K. Y., Norbury, C. F., & The SCALES team. (2020). Early language competence, but not general cognitive ability, predicts children's recognition of emotion from facial and vocal cues. Peerj, 8(19). Article e9118. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.9118
Abstract: 
The ability to accurately identify and label emotions in the self and others is crucial for successful social interactions and good mental health. In the current study we tested the longitudinal relationship between early language skills and recognition of facial and vocal emotion cues in a representative UK population cohort with diverse language and cognitive skills (N D369), including a large sample of children that met criteria for Developmental Language Disorder (DLD, N D97). Language skills, but not non-verbal cognitive ability, at age 5-6 predicted emotion recognition at age 10-12. Children that met the criteria for DLDshowed a large deficit in recognition of facial and vocal emotion cues. The results highlight the importance of language in supporting identification of emotions from non-verbal cues. Impairments in emotion identification may be one
mechanism by which language disorder in early childhood predisposes children to later adverse social and mental health outcomes.
URI: 
ISBN: 
2167-8359 (online)
Other Identifiers: 
10.7717/peerj.9118
Website: 
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
P-8-19-e9118.pdf1.93 MBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
Show full item record

Page view(s)

16
checked on Aug 13, 2020

Download(s)

5
checked on Aug 13, 2020

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.