Now showing 1 - 10 of 11
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    Teachers’ perceptions of autonomy support
    (Fayetteville State University, 2023)
    Siacor, Kimberly Hannah
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    This paper aimed to elucidate teachers' perceptions of using autonomy support in Singapore's classrooms. Science and mathematics teachers (N = 10) were gathered for semi-structured interviews after a 10-week autonomy support intervention. Interview transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis with emerging themes pre-conceived from the literature. The qualitative data provides meaningful insights into the teachers' understanding of what autonomy support entails, to which relevant examples of what teachers said and did to be autonomy-supportive were illuminated. The findings present an in-depth description of teachers' experiences of autonomy support, suggesting the interconnected nature of the autonomy-supportive features. Teachers should practice the features of autonomy support in a meaningful and simultaneous manner to support the students effectively. Despite the limitations, the concrete examples of autonomy-supportive practices delineated in this paper can be used as a springboard for teacher education programs and autonomy-support training workshops.
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    Preparing teachers for the changing future (2014-2018)
    The current generation of children must grow up with different competencies to thrive in this highly complex and interconnected world. Amongst others, we need to equip them with twenty-first century skills that include curiosity, self-direction, creativity, innovation, and an inquiring mindset. We are short-changing our children if we teach them the way we were taught. In this era, education must emphasise discovery and facilitate inquiry and problem-solving, and learning should be self-directed and collaborative, as well as meaningful and transferable. From this perspective, teacher education cannot be about teacher training. It must be about developing professional leaders in the field of education. Drawing from Singapore’s experience of preparing teachers for the twenty-first century, this paper will touch on the four pillars of teacher education in the recent development of the Nanyang Technological University-National Institute of Education Teaching Scholars Programme, the enhanced Bachelor of Arts/Science (Education), and the 16-month Postgraduate Diploma in Education Programmes. The four pillars are deepening professionalism, strengthening practice, broadening pedagogies, and developing perspectives. In essence, the paper will focus on developing thinking professionals through (1) ownership of learning and inquiry that deepen professionalism; (2) reflective practice and focused conversations that strengthen teaching competencies and crystallise teacher identity; (3) pedagogical innovations and technology-enabled learning that develop facilitators of learning and architects of learning environment; and (4) a three-pronged approach of the ‘community as coach’, the ‘industry as partner’, and the ‘world as our classroom’ that facilitates a worldview and fosters new ways of thinking.
    WOS© Citations 2Scopus© Citations 1  51
  • Publication
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    The teaching practicum in Singapore
    The teaching practicum is commonly regarded as the capstone course within teacher education programmes because the former immerses novices into the actual complexities of school teaching. Recent reforms in Singapore have increased both the duration as well as sharpened the focus of the teaching practicum experience for pre-service teachers. Benefits include providing local teachers with a better understanding of the meaning(s) of their professional work and helping them apply knowledge to act appropriately across various contexts. It also assists pre-service teachers to interrogate their teaching beliefs and classroom concepts because of increased opportunities to learn for/from practice – the theory–practice nexus is explicitly foregrounded here. This chapter describes how the new enhanced practicum model in the Post Graduate Diploma in Education (PGDE) can shape their emerging identities as teachers as well as to help them inquire deeper into their professional practices. The authors conclude by discussing some implementation issues and possible refinements to the existing practicum model in Singapore.
      34
  • Publication
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    Understanding motivation in education: Theoretical and practical considerations
    (Springer, 2016) ; ;
    Ryan, Richard M.
    In this era of relentless change, explosion of information, and proliferation of technological innovations, it is too simplistic to think that teachers can teach their students everything they need to know in their lifetime. In a world filled with problems that require complex solutions, and issues that are not documented in books and manuals, it is naive to attempt to “drill” and “discipline” students so that they know the “correct” answers. With this reality check, we need to take a cold hard look at what we do in classrooms and schools when we educate our students. We are doing a disservice to our students if we teach content and routines that become obsolete or impart skills that are not transferable. But more importantly, we are shortchanging our students if we champion learning processes that do not impact on life-wide learning, create learning environments that do not encourage self-determination, and develop students who do not have the drive to learn independently.
    WOS© Citations 12  8
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    Problem-based learning and technology: Impact on preservice teachers' motivational orientations
    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an inquiry-based approach to learning that requires students to be engaged with a real-world problem. PBL is underpinned by constructivist learning principles whereby learners will be intrinsically motivated as they are challenged and given autonomy to direct their own learning. In the COVID-19 pandemic teaching and learning landscape, there is an increasing need to harness the affordances of technology to engage students in their learning. In this chapter, preservice teachers are immersed in either a traditional PBL environment (tPBL) or an technology-enhanced PBL environment (ePBL). The focus of this study is to examine the effects of PBL (tPBL and ePBL) on preservice teachers’ motivational orientations. The understanding of the changes in preservice teachers’ motivational orientations after PBL (tPBL and ePBL) will inform teacher educators on how to improve on its implementation to enhance preservice teachers’ motivation to learn. An understanding of how a constructivist pedagogical approach impact on preservice teachers’ motivation to learn is pivotal as teachers role model and design learning environment to inculcate in their learners the motivation and passion to learn and become lifelong learners.
      49
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    Teachers' perceptions, experience and learning
    Teachers’ Perceptions, Experience and Learning offers insightful views on the understanding of the role of teachers and the impact of their thinking and practice. The articles presented in this book illustrate the influence of teachers on student learning, school culture and their own professional identity and growth as well as highlighting challenges and constraints in preand in-service teacher education programmes that can impact teachers’ own learning. The first article examined teacher experiences in the use of “design thinking” by Retna. Next, Hong’s and Youngs’ article looks into contradictory effects of the new national curriculum in South Korea. Lu, Wang, Ma, Clarke and Collins explored Chinese teachers’ commitment to being a cooperating teacher for rural practicum placements. Kainzbauer and Hunt investigate foreign university teachers’ experiences and perceptions in teaching graduate schools in Thailand. On inclusive education in Singapore, Yeo, Chong, Neihart and Huan examined teachers’ first-hand experiences with inclusion; while Poon, Ng, Wong and Kaur study teachers’ perceptions of factors associated with inclusive education. The book ends with two articles on teacher preparation by Hardman, Stoff, Aung and Elliott who examined the pedagogical practices of mathematics teaching in primary schools in Myanmar, and Zein who focuses on teacher learning by examining the adequacy of preservice education in Indonesia for preparing primary school English teachers. The contributing authors’ rich perspectives in different educational, geographical and socio-cultural contexts would serve as a valuable resource for policy makers, educational leaders, individual researchers and practitioners who are involved in teacher education research and policy. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Asia Pacific Journal of Education.
      44
  • Publication
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    Digital portfolios for problem-based learning: Impact on preservice teachers’ learning strategies

    The digital portfolio is often used to assess both student learning process and outcomes. It provides a space where students assume agency over their learning and assessment. However, beyond assessment, the digital portfolio in initial teacher preparation programme can be a student-centric scaffold to facilitate preservice teachers’ acquisition of learning strategies. This is increasingly relevant in a post-covid teaching and learning environment where technology is used to minimise disruption to learning. In this chapter, ePBL is a pedagogical approach whereby the digital portfolio is used as a mediating space for preservice teachers to learn within a Problem-based Learning (PBL) environment. The digital portfolio allows preservice teachers to make their thinking visible to themselves, peers and tutors, reflect on their thoughts and acquire learning strategies for self-directed ad collaborative learning. The focus of this study is to examine the effects of ePBL on preservice teachers’ learning strategies. The understanding of the changes in preservice teachers’ learning strategies after PBL (face-to-face PBL and ePBL) will inform teacher educators on how to improve on its implementation to develop preservice teachers’ learning strategies. Specifically, it informs the design and use of the digital portfolio within a PBL environment to facilitate the development of preservice teachers’ learning strategies. In addition, limitations of the study and future research will also be discussed in the chapter.

      16
  • Publication
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    Building autonomous learners: Perspectives from research and practice using self-determination theory
    (Springer, 2016) ; ;
    Ryan, Richard M.

    This edited work presents a collection of papers on motivation research in education around the globe. Pursuing a uniquely international approach, it also features selected research studies conducted in Singapore under the auspices of the Motivation in Educational Research Lab, National Institute of Education, Singapore.

    A total of 15 chapters include some of the latest findings on theory and practical applications alike, prepared by internationally respected researchers in the field of motivation research in education. Each author provides his/her perspective and practical strategies on how to maximize motivation in the classroom. Individual chapters focus on theoretical and practical considerations, parental involvement, teachers’ motivation, ways to create a self-motivating classroom, use of ICT, and nurturing a passion for learning.

    The book will appeal to several different audiences: firstly, policymakers in education, school leaders and teachers will find it a valuable resource. Secondly, it offers a helpful guide for researchers and teacher educators in pre-service and postgraduate teacher education programmes. And thirdly, parents who want to help their children pursue lifelong learning will benefit from reading this book.

    WOS© Citations 30  18