Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10497/19845
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Issue Date: 
Sep-1989
Citation: 
Wong, L. S. Y. (1989, September). Do academic subject areas matter when making causal attributions? Paper presented at the 6th Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society Cognitive Psychology Section, Cambridge, UK.
Abstract: 
Causal attribution has been found to have great effect on future performance. Studies on causal attribution
investigate either its consistency, or its influence on the learners in the hope to explore possible modifications. The methods of studying causal attribution vary in terms of measures, situations, and tasks. This study investigated causal attributions across two academic subjects and two outcomes using an open-ended measure. A whole standard of 180 grade nine female students stated their best and worst subjects and provided their perceived causes for doing well and doing poorly in each subject. From their responses, causal attributions were analysed in terms of factors and dimensions. Findings differ from previous results, and provide further insight for future research, especially on attribution retraining for academic performance.
Description: 
This paper was presented at 6th Annual Conference of the British Psychological Society Cognitive Psychology Section, held in Cambridge, UK from 8 - 10 Sep 1989
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Appears in Collections:Conference Papers

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