Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10497/24656
Title: 
Authors: 
Keywords: 
News headline
Media framing
Country image
COVID-19
China
The Economist
Issue Date: 
2022
Citation: 
Sun, X., & Cheung, Y. L. (2022). Portrayal of China in online news headlines: A framing and syntactic analysis. Journalism Studies. Advance online publication. https://doi.org/10.1080/1461670x.2022.2138946
Journal: 
Journalism Studies
Abstract: 
Arguably the first thing that a reader notices of a news item, the headline serves the semantic function of providing pertinent information and the pragmatic function of appealing to target addressees. Moreover, it often embodies the stance of the news writer or the news agency on a particular issue and could program the reader’s perception and interpretation of the ensuing news story in a pre-determined direction. In view of the distinctive significance of headlines in news discourse, in this paper, we analyze how the headlines of The Economist, an elite newsmagazine, frame China in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic. The sample of headlines was examined for their structural components, syntactic features, as well as linguistic characteristics, and compared with a selection of the outlet’s headlines on COVID responses of certain other countries. Through identifying the framing patterns adopted in the headlines and unpacking the ideological overtones encoded therein, this systematic analysis has illuminated the role and effects of the tactful employment of language in constructing country image and striking a balance between purported impartiality and ideological dispositions. Its findings and implications are expected to contribute to scholarship on media framing and inform the practice of journalistic writing.
URI: 
ISSN: 
1461-670X (print)
1469-9699 (online)
DOI: 
File Permission: 
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