Now showing 1 - 10 of 19
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Ratio reasoning and kindergarteners’ math ability
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2022) ; ;
    Bull, Rebecca
      58  53
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Working memory training and math achievement evidence from a large-scale intervention in a real learning environment.
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2020) ; ;
    Lee, Kerry
    ;
    Bull, Rebecca
    ;
    Cheam, Fiona
    ;
    Ridzuan Abdul Rahim
      195  197
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Numeracy support in the early years
    (National Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University (NIE NTU), Singapore, 2024) ;
      69  466
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Cross- and within-domain associations of early reading and mathematical skills: Changes across the preschool years
    (2021)
    Kwok, Fu Yu
    ;
    Bull, Rebecca
    ;
    Existing research has mainly examined the role of cognitive correlates of early reading and mathematics from a stationary perspective that does not consider how these skills unfold and interact over time. This approach constraints the interpretation of cross-domain associations and the specificity of domain-specific covariates. In this study, we disentangle the role of these predictors and investigate cross-domain associations between reading, math, and two related domain-specific predictors (phonological awareness and fluency with number sets) over the kindergarten years (n = 512, Mage = 54 months, SDage = 3.5, 52% females). Results reveal that the overlap between reading and math skills changes over development. Reciprocal associations between reading and math abilities are observed at earlier stages; then, reading abilities become the lead force. Findings also show that phonological awareness and fluency with number sets are domain-specific predictors that do not contribute to cross-domain gains in academic skills. Indeed, there is a trend for domain-specific skills to be more strongly related to achievement at the beginning of formal education than at the beginning of kindergarten, which suggests an increasing differentiation of domains over the kindergarten years. Such findings have implications for the timing and nature of interventions that aim to support children's reading and mathematical development.
    WOS© Citations 2Scopus© Citations 3  68  68
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Cultural variability in finger representations / Variabilidad cultural en las representaciones con dedos
    (Sage, 2024)
    Sanchez, Maria Rosario
    ;
    ;
    Matilla, Laura
    ;
    Orrantia, Josetxu
    Finger representations are used to count or show quantities. How fingers are lifted to count and the type of representation that we use to communicate quantities have been the focus of studies that have aimed at providing evidence of dominant patterns across cultures. In the current study, we go beyond those studies and investigate intracultural variability. Specifically, whether finger counting habits and finger montring patterns are similar in children and adults. To this aim, a total of 3,210 Spaniard participants took part in this study (637 children and 2,573 adults). All of them were assessed regarding handedness, the way in which they counted with their fingers from 1 to 10 (finger counting) and how they show quantities with their fingers (finger montring). The results showed certain consistency; however, there was substantial variability within each group. Findings are interpreted within the context of current theories reinforcing the relevance of finger patterns to support the understanding of the meaning of numbers.
    Scopus© Citations 1  11
  • Publication
    Embargo
    Mapping skills between symbols and quantities in preschoolers: The role of finger patterns
    (Wiley, 2024)
    Orrantia, Josetxu
    ;
    ;
    Sanchez, Rosario
    ;
    Matilla, Laura

    Mapping skills between different codes to represent numerical information, such as number symbols (i.e., verbal number words and written digits) and non-symbolic quantities, are important in the development of the concept of number. The aim of the current study is to investigate children's mapping skills by incorporating another numerical code that emerges at early stages in development, finger patterns. Specifically, the study investigates (i) the order in which mapping skills develop and the association with young children's understanding of cardinality; and (ii) whether finger patterns are processed similarly to symbolic codes or rather as non-symbolic quantities. Preschool children (3-year-olds, N = 113, Mage = 40.8 months, SDage = 3.6 months; 4-year-olds, N = 103, Mage = 52.9 months, SDage = 3.4 months) both cardinality knowers and subset-knowers, were presented with twelve tasks that assessed the mappings between number words, Arabic digits, finger patterns, and quantities. The results showed that children's ability to map symbolic numbers precedes the understanding that such symbols reflect quantities, and that children recognize finger patterns above their cardinality knowledge, suggesting that finger patterns are symbolic in essence.

      25  13
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Supporting the understanding of cardinal number knowledge in preschoolers: Evidence from instructional practices based on finger patterns
    (2022)
    Orrantia, Josetxu
    ;
    ;
    Sanchez, Maria Rosario
    ;
    Matilla, Laura
    The acquisition of cardinal numbers represents a crucial milestone in the development of early numerical skills and more advanced math abilities. However, relatively few studies have investigated how children's grasping of the cardinality principle can be supported. It has been suggested that the richness of number inputs children receive influences the acquisition of cardinal numbers. The present study was designed to investigate whether canonical finger patterns representing numbers may contribute to this acquisition. Fifty-one 3-year-olds were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 training conditions: (a) a condition that involved counting and labeling, which has shown efficacy to support the acquisition of cardinality, and (b) a condition in which counting and labeling were enriched with finger patterns. Crucially, we aimed at providing evidence of both training programs in a real-life learning environment where teachers incorporated the training as a group-based activity into their regular schedule of daily activities. Children assigned to the finger-based condition outperformed those who received the counting-and-label training. Findings suggest that finger patterns may have a role in children's cardinality understanding. Furthermore, our study shows that instructional approaches for improving cardinality understanding can be easily and successfully implemented into real-life learning settings.
    WOS© Citations 2Scopus© Citations 5  210
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    The development of early arithmetic skills: What, when, and how?
    Arithmetic skills – the ability to add, subtract, multiply, and divide – are the building blocks of mathematics. Poor arithmetic skills can lead to poor job prospects and life outcomes. It is thus important to investigate the development of arithmetic skills. What constitute the foundations for arithmetic skills? When do they develop? Previous studies have highlighted the importance of the toddler and preschool period as providing foundations for later math learning. In this chapter, we provide an overview of key factors across domain-specific and domain-general areas that support the development of arithmetic skills. We then draw on existing data from the Singapore Kindergarten Impact Project (SKIP) and describe the performance of basic numeracy skills at entry to kindergarten that are relevant for arithmetic learning. These skills include counting, informal arithmetic, and the reading and writing of Arabic digits. Finally, we conclude with guidelines for promoting the development of early mathematical knowledge in the classroom and at home.
      335
  • Publication
    Embargo
    The development of number line estimation in children at risk of mathematics learning difficulties: A longitudinal study
    (Elsevier, 2024)
    Ruiz, Carola
    ;
    Kohnen, Saskia
    ;
    ;
    Bull, Rebecca
    Children with mathematics learning difficulties (MLD) show poorer performance on the number line task, but how performance on this task relates to other mathematical skills is unclear. This study examined the association between performance on the number line task and mathematical skills during the first 2 years of school for children at risk of MLD. Children (N = 100; Mage = 83.63 months) were assessed on four occasions on the number line task and other mathematical skills (math fluency, numerical operations, and mathematical reasoning). Estimation patterns were analyzed based on the representational shift and proportional judgment accounts separately. More consistent longitudinal trends and stronger evidence for differences in mathematical skills based on estimation patterns were found within the representational shift account. Latent growth curve models showed accuracy on the number line task as a predictor of growth in some mathematical skills assessed. We discuss impacts of methodological limitations on the study of estimation patterns.
      11  15
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Working memory and numeracy training for children with math learning difficulties: Evidence from a large-scale implementation in the classroom
    (2022) ;
    Lee, Kerry
    ;
    Bull, Rebecca
    ;
    ;
    Cheam, Fiona
    ;
    Ridzuan Abdul Rahim
    We explored the challenges, limitations, and potential effectiveness of a large-scale computerized working memory and numeracy intervention in the classroom with children at risk of mathematical learning disabilities (n = 428, Mage = 83.85 months, 41% female). Children were assigned to four different treatment protocols (working memory [WM], working memory plus numeracy [NWM], numeracy [NUM], and active control [AC]) that were implemented as part of normally scheduled class activities for 1 year. Wide variability in training exposure highlighted the challenges of implementing an ecologically valid large-scale classroom intervention. The NUM and NWM intervention contributed to improvements in various early numeracy skills as well as math achievement after accounting for training exposure. Some of these effects emerged once the intervention concluded. However, the intervention failed to improve WM, which was likely due to insufficient training dosage in the practical setting. Findings suggest that combining both working memory and numerical skills training is worth further investigation. The study also provides evidence of challenges related to the implementation of training programs in real-life learning environments.
    WOS© Citations 6Scopus© Citations 12  132  918