Now showing 1 - 10 of 60
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Development & application of a diagnostic instrument to evaluate secondary students' conceptions of qualitative analysis
    (Curtin University of Technology, 2000)
    The primary purpose of this study was to develop a two-tier multiple choice diagnostic instrument to assess Singapore Grade 10 students' (15 to 17 years old) understanding and alternative conceptions of qualitative analysis. Additional and related purposes were to determine whether more advanced chemistry students, for example, junior college (Grade 11 and 12) students, undergraduates and graduate trainee-teachers have a better understanding of basic qualitative analysis than secondary students, and to develop appropriate teaching strategies and materials on qualitative analysis based on the findings of this study and a review of the literature on practical work. The results from the administration of the diagnostic instrument showed that Singapore Grade 10 students had many alternative conceptions related to qualitative analysis, and these were grouped under the headings of ‘Displacement’, ‘Redox’, ‘Dissolution’, ‘Addition of acid’ and ‘Heating’. The cross-age study showed that the more advanced chemistry students generally had a better understanding of basic qualitative analysis but had similar alternative conceptions as the Grade 10 students. However, the alternative conceptions identified were consistently held by only a small number of students across all contexts examined in the diagnostic instrument, suggesting that a number of students either had more than one conception for a particular concept or no conceptions at all. The results from the trial of the qualitative analysis teaching package indicated that the teaching package was feasible. Teachers involved in the trial found it structured and comprehensive, and the students who experienced the teaching package performed better on the diagnostic instrument than a comparison group. The study recommends that better ways of conducting qualitative analysis practical work are required, and using the teaching package may be a step in this direction. The study also raises questions about the value of teaching qualitative analysis in secondary schools when important reactions involved in qualitative analysis are omitted from the syllabus, and when there is little incentive and time in the school curriculum for learners to understand what they are doing in qualitative analysis.
      468  1634
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Use of dataloggers in science learning in Singapore schools
    (2005-11)
    Seah, Whye Choo
    ;
    ;
    Hedberg, John G.
    ;
    Koh, Thiam Seng
    This paper reports on the findings from an online survey administered to 593 science teachers including heads of science departments in 2004. This survey is part of a study initiated in December 2003 to examine the implementation, efficacy and use of dataloggers in Singapore science curricula. Dataloggers were introduced to all Singapore schools during the First Masterplan for IT in Education (1997-2002) to support science learning and experimentation. The aim of the survey is to find out how secondary schools and junior colleges have been supporting and integrating the use of these dataloggers in the teaching and learning of science. The findings from this survey address : profile of schools and teachers using dataloggers; ways in which dataloggers are used in the science curriculum; teachers’ perceptions on whether pupils were able to interpret and analyse graphs; roles of teachers in preparing pupils and guiding them when using dataloggers in set experiments and inquiry based science experiments
      113  3410
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Qualitative analysis practical work: An instructional package
    (The Association for Science Education, 2004-06) ;
    Goh, Ngoh Khang
    ;
    Chia, Lian Sai
    ;
    Treagust, David F.
    Previous research has shown that grade 10 students in Singapore find quaiitative analysis practical work difficult to understand and carry out, and unrelated to the theory they had learned in class. This article describes a teaching package developed explicitly to teach the concepts, processes and thinking skills involved in qualitative analysis.
      429  1823
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Students' conceptions of ionic bonding
    (2000) ;
    Goh, Ngoh Khang
    ;
    Chia, Lian Sai
      90  567
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Research impacting practice: Impetus to change
    (2014-11) ;
    Gilbert, John K.
    One of the aims of science education research is to produce insights into improving the teaching and learning of science in schools. Unfortunately, many teachers continue to teach in the classroom as if no research has been done into the teaching and learning of their subjects. This can be because teachers are generally unaware of relevant work available and that few researchers are willing to translate research findings into resources which teachers can easily understand and use in class. A survey study which examined the impact of educational research on Singapore middle and high school chemistry teachers' instructional and curricular practices was conducted using semi-structured interviews from 2011 to 2013. This paper reports the findings of the study related to the factors which facilitated or impeded changes in the teachers' existing practices; the findings revealed that these were related to students, teachers, school, Ministry of Education, time, educational research and teacher professional development. The paper also discusses the sources of information that the teachers used to guide them in making changes or adopting new practices; these included colleagues, teacher educators, electronic resources, conferences and professional development courses, and educational research. This study can inform researchers of the issues that are important to teachers and ways of working with them to address these issues.
      112  118
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Student learning and representation of the particulate nature of matter
    (2023) ;
    Yeo, Jennifer Ai Choo
    ;
    Wong, Choun Pei
    ;
    Seah, Lay Hoon
    Particle nature of matter is one of the most challenging models students encounter in secondary science. Numerous studies have written about the learning impediments and the alternative conceptions that students have while learning to understand and apply the particle nature of matter to explain phenomena such as thermal expansion and phase changes. This article illustrates how some common representations used in science texts and lessons can inadvertently constrain understanding of the particle model and offers suggestions on how students can be better supported in understanding these representations.
      63  125
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Evaluating students’ understanding of chemical bonding
    (1999) ;
    Treagust, David F.
    Problems students encounter with understanding the abstract concept of chemical bonding, as revealed in previous research, are outlined. The development of a two-tier multiple-choice diagnostic instrument for assessing alternative conceptions about chemical bonding held by 14–16 year-olds is described. The instrument was administered to 119 chemistry students and the results analysed. The common alternative conceptions they were found to hold are listed and discussed. It was found that this instrument provided an easy-to-administer tool, providing results in a readily accessible form.
      3064  3436
  • Publication
    Open Access
    An analysis of two textbooks on the topic of intermolecular forces
    (The Education University of Hong Kong, 2004) ;
    Chan, Kim Seng
    This paper describes the analysis of two commonly used high school (Grades 11 and 12) chemistry textbooks in Singapore to determine if the content presented in the topic of intermolecular forces is consistent with the concepts and propositional knowledge identified by the authors as essential for the learning and understanding of the topic according to the Singapore high school chemistry syllabus. The authors found that the two textbooks did not adequately discuss the electrostatic nature of intermolecular forces, and the factors influencing the polarity of bonds/molecules, hydrogen bonding and instantaneous dipole-induced dipole interactions. The insufficient coverage of the above areas may lead to students having alternative conceptions of intermolecular forces as they may have incomplete or little understanding of the concepts involved and relationships between these concepts. Thus, teachers need to analyse textbooks carefully before using the textbooks so that they can be more aware of the difficulties that students may face when reading the textbooks, and attend to these areas by careful elaboration and integration of concepts in their lessons.
      176  363