Now showing 1 - 10 of 48
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Technical creativity in an international comparative perspective
    (1995-08)
    Moritz, E. F.
    ;
    This paper intends to shed a new light on the scientific as well as application-oriented discussion about technical creativity by presenting and interrelating the results of a number of comparative studies about the relevance, perception, and practice of technical creativity in Japan and Germany. As an example, it will be explained why German engineers may be said to be more creative in the mechanical field, and their Japanese counterparts more successful in designing electrical devices. But it will also be shown that a more complex and distinctive understanding of technical creativity is necessary in order to avoid the constant reproduction of ethnocentric self-fulfilling prophecies in this field, and to become able to propose "culture-sensitive" measures to increase creativity in students and engineers alike.
      79  86
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    An exploratory study on perceptions of creative teaching and roles among Singapore's early childhood educators
    (2021)
    Lim, Siew Eng
    ;
    An exploratory study was conducted which aimed to find out Singapore’s early childhood educators’ views on creative teaching and educator roles. Two research questions were posed: What are early childhood educators’ views on creative teaching? What are their views on educator roles? A total of 35 early childhood educators participated in the study. They filled out a questionnaire, which comprised two measures: Perceived competencies of creative teaching and perceived educator roles. The perceived competencies of creative teaching scale comprised 49 items and the perceived educator roles scale comprised 54 items. For the two measures, a 9-Likert scale was used with indicators: 1 being “extremely not competent” or “extremely not important”, 9 being “extremely competent” or “extremely important”. Using SPSS, reliability, factor, correlational, and cluster analyses were performed on data collected from the questionnaire. The findings suggested that early childhood educators in the study perceived relatively highly their competencies in creative teaching and they highly rated their multiple teacher roles for creative teaching.
      86
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Singaporean student teachers’ perception of teacher behaviors important for fostering creativity
    (2002) ;
    Goh, Swee Chiew
    In an interview setting, 144 participants who completed two blocks of teaching practice (five and eight weeks) were invited to share their teaching experiences with respect to cultivating creativity. Specifically, they were requested to rate some adjectives (e.g., caring, creative) or short phrases (e.g., has interest in many areas) that described them, and their perception of teacher behaviors important for fostering creativity. The factor and cluster analyses showed that the majority of the student teachers wished to be seen as caring and/or assertive teachers. Significant results were found with regard to teachers’ behaviors in stimulating thinking, asking questions, and facilitating evaluation. The majority of the student teachers (80% and above) associated high achievers with teacher competence in, and dispositions for fostering creativity. Implications of the findings of the study were elicited for fostering teachers' behaviors toward enhancing creativity within Singapore's teacher educational context.
      142  374
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Does bilingualism mean biculturalism?
    (1996-11)
    One may easily associate bilingualism with biculturalism. Is bilingualism the same as biculturalism? Definitions of culture show that language is an essential component, but not the only one. If a person is proficient in two languages, he/she is a bilingual. However, he/she may not be a bicultural. Positive attitudes towards another culture are indispensable for a person who does not come from a bicultural family background to appreciate values and practices of a second culture. Factors that facilitate biculturalism are more complex than those governing in learning two languages. This article attempts to identify these factors through a few cases. Parents' and educators' attitudes, in a heterogeneous or a homogenous society are discussed, in how they guide pupils to learn a second language and to appreciate a second culture.
      156  155
  • Publication
    Open Access
    International high school students’ perceived creativity self-efficacy
    (2008)
    Hill, Alan
    ;
    ;
    Kikuchi, Akio
    A total of 416 high school students rated their perceptions of creativity self-efficacy, emotions and achievement goal orientation. Three subscales of creativity self-efficacy were developed - abilities to generate novel ideas, tolerate uncertainty and focus. Affect was assessed using three scales: the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, The Satisfaction with Life Scale and the Subjective Happiness Scale. An achievement goal-orientation scale was used to assess four possible achievement goal-orientations. Acceptable Cronbach's Alphas demonstrated the reliability of the scales and hence the appropriateness of using them with the international students. Creativity self-efficacy was positively correlated with positive affect and a mastery-approach orientation that was consistent with current theory and research findings. The relationships between the other three achievement goal-orientations (performance-approach, performance-avoidance, and mastery-avoidance) and creative self-efficacy were less clearly established. Each goal-orientation was positively correlated with some, but not all, aspects of creativity efficacy. The performance approach orientation was negatively correlated with the uncertainty subscale of creativity self-efficacy.
      236  1041
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Culture influences learning style and self-perception: some insights for teachers
    There are various learning styles and different kinds of self perception. In part one of this article, two learning styles, group and individual, are illustrated by referring to the stories of Taro, a Japanese student, and Wolfgang, a German student. The type of self-perception that a person possesses is likely to be influenced by the type of cultural environment. This argument is discussed in part two. Part three focuses on the transfer of knowledge. Knowledge should be appropriately modified according to the level of understanding and to the culture of the students. Individual differences exist across cultures as well as in a culture.
      169  186
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Singaporean children's views of desirable activities and useful activities for fostering creativity
    Singaporean children's views of activities that they desire in the classroom and that they consider useful for fostering creativity are investigated. In the first study, 225 children (age 9-12 years) rated on a 5-Likert scale the degree of desirability of 25 activities that they wish to have. Three interpretative factors were identified. Factor 1 refers to conventional activities that take place every day (e.g., doing worksheet, spelling words). Factor 2 consists of alternative activities that can generate different learning atmospheres (e.g., games, riddles, learning computer skills). Factor 3 represents activities that demand children's active involvement (e.g., role-plays, project work). In the second study, 115 children (9-12 years old) rated the degree of usefulness of the same activities for fostering creativity on a 5-Likert scale. Four interpretative factors were identified. Factor 1 is defined as basic knowledge acquisition (e.g., reading, teacher demonstration). Factor 2 consists of activities that can generate enjoyment in classroom learning (e.g., quizzes, competition). Factor 3 represents activities that challenge children's independent learning skills (e.g., writing, project work). Factor 4 is composed of two activities related to the acquisition of multimedia expertise (learning computer and video show). Discussion on the inclusion of children's views in classroom learning is presented.
      148  259
  • Publication
    Open Access
    An exploratory study of Singaporean primary pupils' desirable activities
    An instrument was developed mainly from responses of primary school pupils (8-12 years old) to an open-ended question. It aimed at finding out types of activities that primary school pupils wish to have in English lessons. Two hundred and ten primary four and five pupils ( 10-12 years old) of three schools in Singapore rated the activities individually according to their preference. There were three interpretative factor structures. The first factor ( F 1) comprised items related to the conventional classroom activities (e.g., doing worksheet, spelling words). The second factor (F2) consisted of items related to unconventional/earning activities in and outside classrooms (e.g., games, computer learning, outdoor activities). The third factor (F3) comprised items related to activities that demand expressive and linguistic competence (e.g., showing and telling, role play). Using cluster analysis, the pupils were re-grouped according to these factors. Within a class there were pupils who demonstrated a high desirability for all activities. There were also pupils who showed less desirability for all activities. Implications of the findings for teachers were elicited.
      145  168
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Critical thinking
    (2000)
    Law, Lai-Chong
    ;
      157  598