Now showing 1 - 6 of 6
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Developing resilience online: Evaluation of synchronous and asynchronous resilience interventions for Filipino college students
    (2023)
    Hechanova, Maria Regina H.
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    Alianan, Arsenio
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    Santos, Junix Jerald I. Delos
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    Manaois, Jason O.
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    Gomez, Gilda A.
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    Lamzon, Gina R.
    This study evaluated two forms of a resilience intervention amongst college students during the COVID-19 pandemic. Utilising a randomised controlled trial design, it examined the impact of a synchronous and asynchronous resilience interventions versus a control group that did a journaling intervention. Outcomes measured included coping behaviour, non-reactivity, wellbeing, stress, depression and anxiety. Participants consisted of Filipino college students randomly assigned to three groups: synchronous online resilience group (n = 135), asynchronous resilience group (n = 121) and control group (n = 127). Results revealed that students who went through the online synchronous resilience reported a significant reduction in depression at post-intervention compared to those who went through an asynchronous intervention. Post-intervention scores for nonreactivity were also higher in the synchronous group compared to both asynchronous and journaling groups. Effect sizes were small to moderate. This study suggests that online resilience interventions are viable means to address the mental health needs of students, especially in countries with limited mental health resources.
    WOS© Citations 1Scopus© Citations 1  51  73
  • Publication
    Embargo
    Evaluation of a brief online parenting training for community service providers in the Philippines
    (Elsevier, 2024)
    Reyes, Dominiq Ruth G.
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    Peña Alampay a, Liane
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    Landoy Mamauag, Bernice
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    Reyes, Jennel C.
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    Lachman, Jamie M.
    The study evaluates the effectiveness of a two-session brief online training to equip local community service providers in various regions of the Philippines to facilitate a parenting program. Three levels from Kirkpatrick’s (2016) evaluation model were assessed, namely: (1) reactions, (2) learning, and (3) changes in caregiving behaviors. Results obtained from participants of the first (N = 3476) and second session (N = 1837) showed positive reactions towards the training. Relatively high levels of knowledge were observed, especially for topics focused on child and parental well-being, establishing household rules and routines, and resolving problems as a family. Exploration of parenting behavior outcomes from a select sample of service providers who were caregivers (N = 54) showed decreases in parenting stress and parental depression from baseline to 6-month follow-up. Findings of this study provide preliminary evidence on the benefits of brief online trainings on caregiver well-being and recommendations for improvements in program delivery and further research.
      17  13
  • Publication
    Open Access
    "What does that mean?": The content validity of the ISPCAN Child Abuse Screening Tool - Child version (ICAST-C) in Romania, South Africa, and the Philippines
    (2022)
    Lakshmi Neelakantan
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    Fry, Deborah
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    Florian, Lani
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    Silion, Doriana
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    Filip, Madalina
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    Thabeng, Mildred
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    Te, Kathlyn
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    Sunglao, Jun Angelo
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    Lu, Mengyao
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    Ward, Catherine L.
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    Baban, Adriana
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    Alampay, Liane
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    Meinck, Franziska
    Background The International Society for Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (ISPCAN) Child Abuse Screening Tool (Children's Version), known as the ICAST-C Version 3, is used widely to assess violence against children, but there is limited psychometric evidence, especially on content validity. Objective This study aimed to assess the content validity of the ICAST-C with adolescents in Romania, South Africa, and the Philippines. Methods A purposive sample of adolescents (N = 53, 51 % female) were recruited from urban areas in Romania, the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa, and Metro Manila, Philippines. Semi-structured one-on-one in-depth cognitive interviews sought adolescent perspectives on the relevance, comprehensibility, and comprehensiveness of the ICAST-C. Data were analysed using template analysis. Results The ICAST-C was broadly perceived to be relevant and comprehensive in measuring violence against children in all study locations. However, there were issues with the comprehensibility of the measure, described at three levels: interpreting items, undertaking coherent elaborations of relevant behaviors and places, and generating a coherent response to the questions. Conclusions Suggestions to revise the ICAST-C include, among others, adding a practice or how-to section on answering the survey, clarifying the intent of questions, especially on neglect and sexual abuse, emphasizing that questions cover all locations, and asking more positive questions. Pilot studies testing the content validity and cultural appropriateness are needed as a matter of practice in large self-report surveys.
    Scopus© Citations 1  37  17
  • Publication
    Embargo
    Feasibility and acceptability of a digital parent group chat intervention to prevent child and adolescent maltreatment in the Philippines
    (Wiley, 2024)

    This study examined the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes of MaPaChat, a parent support intervention delivered using Viber group chat to caregivers in the Philippines during the COVID-19 pandemic. Forty caregivers of children aged 4–17 from predominantly low-income households participated in a culturally adapted version of the Parenting for Lifelong Health ParentChat programme. Feasibility was assessed by enrolment, attendance, and dropout rates. Semi-structured interviews with caregivers and programme facilitators explored programme acceptability. A single-group pre-post design was used to explore changes in child maltreatment, positive parenting, parenting stress, and other secondary outcomes. The mean attendance rate was 82% and the dropout rate was 10%. Caregivers and facilitators found the programme helpful in enhancing parenting knowledge and skills and were satisfied with the programme delivery using Viber group chat but also reported experiencing technological challenges. Pre-post comparisons suggested that the intervention has potential in reducing physical and emotional abuse and associated risk factors. The findings suggest that a parenting intervention delivered over digital group chat by trained community service providers may be a feasible and acceptable way to support caregivers in low-resource settings.

      9  20
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Pre-post mixed methods study of a parent and teen support intervention to prevent violence against adolescents in the Philippines
    (2023) ;
    Alampay, Liane
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    Lachman, Jamie M.
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    Maramba, Denise Hazelyn
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    Melgar, Marika E.
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    Ward, Catherine L.
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    Madrid, Bernadette J.
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    Gardner, Frances
    Purpose This study examines the feasibility of a culturally adapted parenting intervention (MaPa Teens) within the national cash transfer system to reduce violence against adolescents, the first such program in the Philippines.
    Methods Thirty caregiver-adolescent dyads who were beneficiaries of a government conditional cash transfer program participated in a pilot of a locally adapted version of the Parenting for Lifelong Health for Parents and Teens program. Primary outcomes of reducing child maltreatment and associated risk factors were evaluated using a single-group, pre-post design. Focus group discussions explored the perceptions of participants and facilitators regarding program acceptability and feasibility.
    Results Significant and moderate reductions were reported in overall child maltreatment and physical abuse (caregiver and adolescent reports) and in emotional abuse (adolescent report). There were significant reductions in neglect, attitudes supporting punishment, parenting stress, parental and adolescent depressive symptoms, parent-child relationship problems, and significant improvement in parental efficacy in managing child behavior. Adolescents reported reduced behavior problems, risk behavior, and witnessing of family violence. Participants valued learning skills using a collaborative approach, sustained their engagement between sessions through text messages and phone calls, and appreciated the close interaction with caring and skilled facilitators. Program areas of improvement included addressing barriers to attendance, increasing adolescent engagement, and revising the sexual health module.
    Discussion The study provides preliminary support for the effectiveness and feasibility of the program in reducing violence against Filipino adolescents. Findings suggest potential adaptations of the program, and that investment in more rigorous testing using a randomized controlled trial would be worthwhile.
    WOS© Citations 3Scopus© Citations 6  36  11