Now showing 1 - 10 of 17
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The marketisation of education in Singapore: Policies and implications
    (1996-11)
    This article focuses on the marketisation of education in Singapore since the mid-1980s. It describes and analyses several policies and trends. These include the encouragement of greater school autonomy, the fostering of competition among schools, an increased private involvement in educational provision, the growth in entrepreneurial activities among schools and a greater involvement of schools in marketing activities. In addition, the article argues that the Singapore case does not actually involve a free market, but rather a controlled, or quasi-market. The promotion of such a quasi-market threatens to exacerbate not only the disparities between schools in terms of educational outcomes but also social inequalities. At the same time, it is not entirely clear whether the desired policy goals will be successfully attained. The discussion adds to the existing literature on the marketisation of education and its accompanying policy implications.
      459  226
  • Publication
    Open Access
      103  1022
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Education and colonial transition in Singapore and Hong Kong: Comparisons and contrasts
    (1997)
    As Hong Kong approached its hand-over to Chinese sovereignty, it has been instructive to compare its experience with that in other former British colonies. This article focuses on how education policies in areas such as the medium of instruction nd curriculum changed as Singapore moved towards self-government and independence in the 1950s and 1960s. It also ompares the changes that took place in Singapore with those currently occurring in Hong Kong. Observations will be made about the likelihood of the 'one country, two systems' concept working in Hong Kong after 1997.
      179  485
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Higher education in Singapore
    (Springer, 2022)
    Singapore's university system has expanded over the past three decades and has been transformed from an elite system into a mass system, in which over 40% of the age cohort is enrolled in one of the six publicly funded autonomous universities. This chapter illustrates a strong government role in terms of provision, financing, and regulation. In the year 2000, the Ministry of Education began granting greater operating autonomy to publicly funded universities while retaining centralized control over the overall policy direction for the university sector. A decade later, the Ministry introduced new regulations governing the provision of private higher education institutions in response to growing public concerns over the quality of these providers. While Singapore has broadened access to public universities, its government has had to tread a delicate balance between its desire to recruit more international students and faculty and public concern over the perceived competition that this policy poses to locally born students and faculty. Over the past decade, the government has attempted to recast university education as being one step in a process of lifelong learning and to popularize the idea of accessing a university education after individuals have entered the workforce.
      55
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Teacher preparation in Singapore: A concise critical history
    (Emerald Publishing, 2022)
    Chia, Yeow-Tong
    ;
    Chew, Alistair Martyn Khean-En
    ;
    Over the last two decades, the range of curricular offerings in Singapore has diversified almost beyond the ability of teacher preparation systems to cope. Teacher training has evolved from informal to formal, and from multiple 'providers' to a single institution responsible for pre-service teacher education. Teacher Preparation in Singapore is a non-celebratory and non-institution-based account of teacher preparation written with a critical academic lens. Contributing to the historiography of Singapore, as well as to the general history of teacher education, this book discusses the history of teacher preparation in Singapore from the colonial era, when Singapore was the centre of British Malaya, to the present day. It includes the pre-professional era of an informal approach to teacher education before the establishment of formal teacher training, the role of the colonial state and post-colonial state in the provision of teacher education, and issues such as policy borrowing, diffusion of educational philosophies, and developments paralleling those in the United Kingdom and elsewhere. This is a relevant and important book for researchers of education history, comparative and international education, and teacher education in Singapore.
      105
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Flipped learning
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2018)
      43  64
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Avoiding the “prolonged agony” of studying for standardized national exams: At what price?
    (2009-11)
    Lim, Xuan-Shi
    ;
    ;

    Standardized tests, often high-stakes in nature, are a common feature of many education systems. Although there is a movement towards authentic and/or varied assessment practices, there is still a strong reliance on standardized tests to measure student achievement despite their widely discussed and documented negative effects on teaching and learning. Short of doing away with standardized testing completely, reducing the number of mandatory high stakes national examinations seems to be a realistic and feasible solution in theory. The Integrated Programme (IP) in Singapore allows high-ability students to bypass the General Certificate of Education 'Ordinary' Level examinations at the end of their secondary education, but they are required to sit for the General Certificate of Education Advanced Level examinations, International Baccalaureate, or Advanced Placement in the final year of their pre-university education.

    As intended, the removal of a national standardized examination frees up time and space in the curriculum for the pursuit of a more holistic, broad-based education and diversified assessment modes in the four years of secondary schooling. In effect, IP students enjoy a longer break between mandatory national exams, i.e. the Primary School Leaving Examinations (PSLE) and the 'A’ Levels. This paper surfaces the concerns and anxieties of IP students regarding their ability to do well in a national examination, especially since they have grown accustomed to a different mode of assessment in their secondary education. Additionally, this paper examines student views on the relevance of their prior learning experiences in light of their preparation for the 'A’ Levels, IB or AP.

    Focus group discussions were conducted annually in seven schools for three consecutive years. Online surveys were administered annually to IP students from participating schools over the span of four years. The longitudinal design tracks changes in students’ perspectives about their educational experiences as they transition from secondary to tertiary education. Quantitative findings from online surveys are included to supplement qualitative analysis; specifically, self-reported data on examination anxiety and on the use of assessment methods.

    Findings indicate that students generally felt they were lacking in examination-taking techniques or skills and worried that they lack the mental stamina needed to sustain them through examinations. Discontinuities in the academic domain made some students feel that their learning experiences in the secondary years were irrelevant. Others acknowledged the discontinuities but focused instead on their personal growth, and were thus able to integrate their experiences into a coherent educational narrative. A deeper understanding of students’ lived experiences would help unearth important considerations for policymakers and educators seeking to enrich learning experiences for students within the climate of high-stakes standardized testing.

      153  148
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Education reform in Singapore: Towards greater creativity and innovation?
    (National Institute for Research Advancement (NIRA), 2000) ;
    Gopinathan, Saravanan
      518  6808
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Higher education in Singapore
    (2022)
    Singapore's university system has expanded over the past three decades and has been transformed from an elite system into a mass system, in which over 40% of the age cohort is enrolled in one of the six publicly funded autonomous universities. This chapter illustrates a strong government role in terms of provision, financing, and regulation. In the year 2000, the Ministry of Education began granting greater operating autonomy to publicly funded universities while retaining centralized control over the overall policy direction for the university sector. A decade later, the Ministry introduced new regulations governing the provision of private higher education institutions in response to growing public concerns over the quality of these providers. While Singapore has broadened access to public universities, its government has had to tread a delicate balance between its desire to recruit more international students and faculty and public concern over the perceived competition that this policy poses to locally born students and faculty. Over the past decade, the government has attempted to recast university education as being one step in a process of lifelong learning and to popularize the idea of accessing a university education after individuals have entered the workforce.
      324