Now showing 1 - 10 of 42
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    The values of pinnacle leaders in Singapore education: A qualitative study of cluster superintendents using Schwartz's theory of human values
    (2018)
    Neo, Qing Hao
    ;
    Much can be learned from leaders who have reached their pinnacle. In the education context of Singapore, cluster superintendents can be considered leaders who have reached the heights of their leadership career. They would have most likely started as a teacher, and progressed to take the middle leadership positions such as the subject head or the head of department. From middle leadership positions they would then progressed to become vice-principals, and then to principals before taking on their current role as cluster superintendents. A few of them could also have held positions at the headquarters of the education ministry. Their leadership experiences would thus have covered several layers of leadership career progression. They would thus carry much lessons which others could learn from, whether it be in terms of knowledge, skills and values. Out of these three, the researchers aim to identify the values that these pinnacle leaders hold and cherish while fulfilling their duties as a cluster superintendent. This study is qualitative in nature, using solely interviews from six retired cluster superintendents. The retired status serves to optimise the knowledge gathering as it helps to minimise self-censorship of sensitive data. With reference to Shalom Schwartz’s theory of human values (1992), values coding was then applied to the transcribed interviews. This study revealed that the superintendents prioritise the value types universalism and benevolence in the management and development of principals; the value type self-direction is important in their professional development needs; and there could be unresolved tension between ranking and development of principals. The findings could provide insights to guide the selection and professional development of cluster superintendents.
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    Leadership for collective learning: An effective distributed perspective
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ;
    Since the turn of the 21st century, the concept of distributed leadership situated within the context of school improvement has risen in importance. This is due to the growing demands on schools from a wide range of stakeholders within education contexts that are increasingly becoming more complex. Educational contexts are increasingly getting complex insofar as the changes accompanying educational reforms are characterized by intensity, rapidity, fluidity and uncertainty. Policymakers and the public are demanding greater public school accountability in the hope of improving academic and non-academic school outcomes, as well as decreasing the achievement gaps (Heck & Moriyama, 2010) through improvements in teaching and learning. It is therefore understandable that contemporary school leaders use up more time and energy in managing increasingly complex relationships, and resort to distributed leadership where leadership decisions are delegated and shared to other staff members beyond the purview of school principals.
    In the Singapore context, delegation or sharing of leadership decisions to middle managers such as department heads (HODs) or subject heads (SHs) has been a common place for more than two decades, especially that pertaining to instruction. In this sense, distributed leadership is closely tied to instructional leadership insofar as the former allows instructional leadership practices to be delegated or shared to other staff members beyond school principals or vice-principals. The link between instructional leadership and distributed leadership has been observed (Lieberman & Miller, 2011; Spillane & Louis, 2002; Timperley, 2005). Hence, instructional leadership practices become more dispersed across the school organization, making it more effective to bring about enhancements in teaching and learning. However, over the last decade, leadership decisions pertaining to instruction have been delegated and shared to teacher leaders. This is a result of the growing demands placed on schools so much so that administrative decisions have to be passed on from senior to middle leaders, which result to middle leaders delegating or sharing their decisions on instructional matters to teacher leaders. These teacher leaders include Senior or Lead Teachers (STs and LTs), Subject and Level Reps, and Professional Learning Community Team Leaders – all of which are involved in making leadership decisions on instruction.
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  • Publication
    Open Access
      114  1514
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Leadership and organizational change in Singapore: A baseline study
    (2015) ; ; ; ;
    Chua, Catherine Siew Kheng
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    Reyes, Vicente C.
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    Choy, William
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    Intan Azura Mokhtar
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    Teng, Antonia Kit Wah
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    Shaljan Areepattamannil
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    Lin, Tzu-Bin
      507  328
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A case study of social constructivist model of teaching in a technology-enabled environment for primary 4 pupils at Nan Chiau Primary
    (2006-05)
    Yeo, Teck Woon
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    Lau, Fatt Yong
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    Leong, Wai Fung
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    Quek, Guan Hui
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    Ser, Yah Lee
    In line with TLLM and I &E, Nan Chiau Primary seeks to move away from the traditional mode of frontal teaching to adopt the social constructivist model of teaching with pedagogical intentions which focus on nurturing pupils skilled in creating, evaluating and sharing knowledge in authentic learning experiences. The school’s Microsoft Class Server, the infrastructure of wireless technology and handheld devices, provides the structure for the integration of social constructivism across four core subjects in the curriculum. The action research conducted in 2005 sought to understand how the social constructivist model of teaching in a technology-enabled environment is integrated in Primary 4 curriculum using three dimensions of inquiry: perceptions of pupils towards learning; practices of learning; and performance of learning. The findings of the action research project hopes to provide a model for teachers and school leaders who wish to better engage pupils in learning through social constructivist processes in an ICT environment.
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  • Publication
    Open Access
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  • Publication
    Open Access
    Local evidence synthesis on school leadership
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2019)
    Ho, Jeanne Marie Pau Yuen
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    Chua, Puay Huat
      543  391
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    Through the lens of the school: School-based curriculum innovation (SCI)
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020)
    Chen, Der-Thanq
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    Chua, Catherine Siew Kheng
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    Neo, Wei Leng
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    Lee, Wei Ching
    Over the past decade, the Singapore government has introduced various initiatives such as Teach Less, Learn More and engaging minds to develop students’ 21st century competencies. One significant approach adopted in these initiatives is to encourage school-based curriculum innovations (SCI).This current initiative involves the participation of all schools in the system. A marked departure from previous practice, schools in Singapore now have more autonomy and space in SCIs through engaging in school-based curriculum development (SBCD) activities. In this study, we used the terms SCI and SBCD interchangeably. This study is novel in taking a comprehensive approach in developing this baseline research of curricular and pedagogical reforms of nine schools in Singapore.
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