Now showing 1 - 10 of 10
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A coherent reflective framework for L2 writing teacher preparation
    (Sage, 2024)
    The second-language writing literature has focused a lot more on how students write and learn to write than how teachers teach and learn to teach writing. Even less literature has been devoted to how teacher educators prepare pre-service and in-service teachers to teach writing. This Viewpoint article serves to fill the void by proposing a three-pronged reflective framework for second-language writing teacher preparation. It addresses the ‘why’, ‘how’ and ‘what’ questions of the teaching of writing, serving as a valuable heuristic and reflective tool to guide writing teachers’ practice. The paper ends with a discussion of the implications of the reflective framework for teacher education, teaching and research in second-language writing contexts.
      12  155
  • Publication
    Embargo
    Emotion regulation of EFL teachers in blended classroom assessment
    (2023)
    Su, Xiaoli
    ;
    Blended classroom assessment (CA) has become commonplace in the post-pandemic era, offering advantages but also presenting challenges for English as a Foreign Language (EFL) teachers. These challenges can impact teachers’ emotional experiences, distinct from face-to-face or purely online environments. However, scant research exists on how EFL teachers employ emotion regulation (ER) strategies in blended CA within EFL contexts. This qualitative study examines how eight EFL teachers at a university in southwestern China employed ER strategies in blended CA. Drawing on Gross’s ER theory, the study identifies ten intrinsic and extrinsic ER strategies, either antecedent-focused or response-focused, utilized by EFL teachers. These strategies helped teachers maintain resilience amidst challenges posed by blended CA, including low completion rates of online learning tasks prior to face-to-face instruction, interaction in blended CA, blended assessment design, managing the workload of blending online and face-to-face assessment, and addressing issues of plagiarism and cheating. The study enriches our understanding of EFL teachers’ emotions in blended CA and underscores the significance of ER competence in assessment literacy. Implications for equipping teachers with strategies to enhance their emotional well-being and resilience in blended CA are also discussed.
    WOS© Citations 1Scopus© Citations 1  45  2
  • Publication
    Embargo
    Exploring contradiction‐driven language teacher identity transformation during curriculum reforms: A Chinese tale
    (Wiley, 2023)
    Wang, Kailun
    ;
    Yuan, Rui
    ;
    The existing literature in TESOL has revealed the multilayered, dynamic, and situated nature of teacher identity, but how language teachers construct their identities during curriculum reforms receives relatively limited attention, particularly in the context of teaching English for specific purposes (ESP). Theoretically anchored by the notion of contradiction in activity theory, this study investigates an ESP teacher's identity transformation in a Chinese university. Drawing on data from semi-structured interviews, classroom observations, and artifacts (policy documents and course materials), the findings reveal that the participant constructed her identities including “a skiff drifting in the dark,” “an optimistic warrior,” and “a nonconformist” through the teaching reform mediated by the corporatized culture and accountability system in higher education. The process of identity transformation was accompanied by her identity-driven efforts to resolve various contradictions and seek the delicate equilibrium between her agency and object-oriented reform. The study offers practical recommendations on teacher development and curriculum reforms for both language teachers and other stakeholders (e.g., teacher educators and school leaders) in different educational contexts.
    Scopus© Citations 1  25  33
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Problematising written corrective feedback: A global Englishes perspective
    (2023)
    In English as an additional language writing, error correction or error feedback is most commonly referred to as ‘written corrective feedback (WCF)’. The emphasis on ‘correctness’ in ‘WCF’ suggests native-speakerist standards or norms, which are controversial in an increasingly globalized world. In this Forum article, I discuss the problems associated with WCF from a Global Englishes perspective and suggest broadening the notion by removing the ‘corrective’ emphasis to encompass a focus on language use. I then examine the benefits of the broadened perspective on ‘feedback on language use’, which will steer research attention away from a narrow focus on error and standards in writing, with useful pedagogical implications that reflect English as a global language in the 21st century.
      28
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Written corrective feedback in second language writing: A synthesis of naturalistic classroom studies
    (Cambridge University Press, 2024)
    Mao, Zhicheng
    ;
    ;
    Li, Shaofeng
    Written corrective feedback (WCF) is a ubiquitous pedagogical activity in second language (L2) classrooms and has become a key area of inquiry in L2 writing research. While there have been several reviews on experimental WCF research, there is not yet a synthesis of naturalistic classroom studies where the type and amount of feedback provided on students' writing performance is not manipulated or controlled. This state-of-the-art article intends to fill the gap by providing a comprehensive and critical review of naturalistic WCF studies in L2 writing, with significant implications for practice and research. A systematic search generated 50 empirical studies that met our inclusion criteria for the current review, which revealed four major themes: (1) teacher WCF practices in L2 writing classrooms, (2) L2 learner responses to WCF, (3) stakeholders’ beliefs and perspectives on WCF, and (4) WCF-related motivation and emotions. Based on the reviewed evidence, we propose pedagogical implications for enhancing teacher WCF practices and student learning, as well as potential avenues for further exploration. This article contributes to a nuanced understanding of current empirical advances in naturalistic research on WCF in L2 writing, providing insights to inform WCF pedagogy and new lines of inquiry.
      11  69
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Writing teacher feedback literacy: Surveying second language teachers’ knowledge, values, and abilities
    (Elsevier, 2024) ;
    Mao, Zhicheng
    Despite a significant rise in awareness of the critical role of assessment literacy, teacher feedback literacy as an important component of assessment literacy has received scant attention in the domain of second language (L2) writing. By drawing on questionnaire data gathered from 353 English as a foreign language teachers and follow-up interviews with 34 focal teachers, this study attempts to ascertain L2 writing teachers’ self-reported feedback literacy in relation to their knowledge, values, and abilities regarding feedback. Findings of the study reveal both deficiencies and gaps in the participants’ writing feedback literacy. While the respondents reported a fundamental understanding of writing teacher feedback literacy, they appeared less certain of their abilities to implement feedback practices in the writing classroom. Despite this uncertainly, they held values about feedback that largely align with the principles supported by existing literature. The current study serves to make a novel contribution to existing research by shedding light on the underexplored concept of L2 writing teacher feedback literacy, with clear implications for the delivery of feedback training in teacher education programs.
      8
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Is the magic in the mix? The development and validation of the L2 teachers’ blended assessment literacy scale
    (Elsevier, 2024)
    Su, Xiaoli
    ;
    Blended learning environments demand teachers possessing a high level of assessment literacy, as they play a crucial role in facilitating students' second language (L2) learning outcomes and overall well-being. However, a notable research gap exists in understanding L2 teacher assessment literacy within the blended learning context, further exacerbated by the scarcity of valid assessment instruments tailored specifically to investigate L2 teachers' assessment literacy for blended learning. To address this gap, the present study undertook the development and validation of the L2 Teachers' Blended Assessment Literacy Scale (L2TBALS). The study involved 614 L2 teachers from China, divided into two sub-samples. The first sample underwent exploratory factor analysis (EFA), which revealed a robust four-factor solution comprising Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, and Socio-emotional management. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) with the other sample of 307 L2 teachers confirmed the scale's structure and sub-scales, establishing the final 40-item L2TBALS as a psychometrically reliable and valid instrument for measuring self-reported L2 teachers' blended assessment literacy. These findings have practical implications for teachers and teacher education programs, as well as broader implications for assessment literacy research.
      3
  • Publication
    Embargo
      14  21
  • Publication
    Embargo
    The development and validation of a scale on L2 writing teacher feedback literacy
    (2023) ;
    Karaca, Mehmet
    ;
    Inan, Serhat
    Feedback literate teachers play a central role in promoting students’ writing performance. In L2 writing, however, there is a paucity of research on teacher feedback literacy, and instruments that investigate L2 writing teacher feedback literacy are virtually non-existent. Heeding the call for research on scale development to measure teacher feedback literacy, this two-phase study is an attempt to develop and validate a feedback literacy scale (FLS) for teachers to illuminate this budding concept in L2 writing. The factor structure of the 34-item FLS was determined through exploratory factor analysis (EFA) with the participation of 223 writing teachers. The results revealed a three-factor solution, namely Perceived Knowledge, Values, and Perceived Skills. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was employed which aimed to verify the structure of the scale and its three sub-scales, based on a sample of another 208 writing teachers. It was found that the model fits the data well (e.g., the RMSEA with 0.052 (90 % CI=0.045–0.059)), proving that the FLS yields psychometrically reliable and valid results, and it is a robust scale to measure the self-reported feedback literacy of L2 writing teachers. In light of these findings, the factor structure and sub-scales of the FLS are discussed. Practical implications for teachers, teacher trainers and teacher education programs, as well as implications for feedback literacy research are provided.
    WOS© Citations 3Scopus© Citations 5  43
  • Publication
    Embargo
    Taking stock of the research into professional learning communities: Paradigms, pathways, and possibilities
    (Elsevier, 2024)
    Chiang, Kwun Man
    ;
    Yin, Hongbiao
    ;
    ;
    Chang, Chih Hao
    This narrative literature review conceptualizes how professional learning communities (PLCs) have been researched via the three paradigms of inquiry proposed by Jürgen Habermas. We first briefly introduce the existing PLC research and then discuss the need for a narrative review through a paradigmatic lens. Next, we outline the characteristics and pathways of the three paradigms that structure our conceptual lens, namely empirical-analytical inquiry, hermeneutic inquiry, and critical inquiry. We then review and critique the existing PLC research from these three paradigms of inquiry to reveal their strengths and shortcomings. Finally, the implications and possibilities for future research are discussed.
      16  31