Now showing 1 - 10 of 21
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Curricular-instructional gatekeeping in Singapore: How teachers enact social studies and give purpose to citizenship education
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020)
    This study focuses on how Singapore teachers enact the social studies curriculum and give purpose to citizenship education, using the concept of the teacher as a curricular-instructional gatekeeper. It provides detailed description on the conceptualizations of citizenship among social studies teachers, drawing from interviews and lesson observations. Unlike studies carried out in the United States that ignore the role of the institution, the negotiation of the institutional curriculum is foregrounded in this study. The qualitative multiple case study will be used to provide insights and depth of understanding and practice of social studies teachers and their conceptions of citizenship.
      320  11
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Social studies in Singapore: contradiction and control
    (2005) ;
    Adler, Susan A.
    This study explores the meanings and contradictions embedded in the Singapore social studies curriculum and challenges educators and policy makers to face those contradictions straight on. The authors reviewed current social studies syllabi and texts, and scripted discussions on itizenship and the social studies curriculum. The participants in these discussions were teachers taking pre- or post-graduate and in-service courses in social studies curriculum at the National Institute for Education.
      345  1954
  • Publication
    Open Access
    What global citizenship means to Singapore primary students
    (Australian Curriculum Studies Association, 2012)
    Zaki Jalil
    ;
    Chua, Seok Hong
    ;
    One challenge in the crafting of a school-based curriculum for global citizenship (GC) is the wide range of conceptualisations of global citizenship ranging from the simple incorporation of group-work in class activity to the inclusion of more issues-based, justice oriented curriculum content. As schools in the small island-state of Singapore 1nake sense of globalisation, what do pupils know or understand about global citizenship? This article reports on the findings of a qualitative study of what local and international pupils, aged 11, understand of GC in Singapore. Broadly, their understanding cohere around three themes respect, responsibility and issues in relationships. These themes are nuanced by differences in perceptions due to the school curriculum, pupils' ethnicity and nationality and, to a lesser extent, gender; these differences underline the need to include pupils' voices for a 1nore dynamic and rigorous approach in global citizenship education (GCE) curriculum development.
      240  1489
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Citizenship attributes for the 21st Century: A study of Singapore teachers’ perceptions in comparative perspectives
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ;
    Chua, Shuyi
    The Ministry of Education (MoE) in Singapore has recently implemented the Curriculum 2015 (C2015) which focuses on the Desired Outcomes of Education (DoE), embodied in the “Confident Person”, “Self-directed Learner”, “Active Contributor”, and “Concerned Citizen”. A new curricular initiative, Citizenship and Character Education (CCE), emphasizes the integrative nature of citizenship and 21st century competencies to bring about the DoEs, was implemented in schools in 2011. A fundamental assumption exists amongst policy makers that education policy will, when translated to school contexts, be implemented faithfully by teachers. But teachers at the institutional levels are not mere passive receivers and implementers of policy decisions. Citizenship is value-laden, and its meanings are varied and contested. Invariably, citizens in the same state will understand citizenship differently. This mixed methods study investigates (a) teachers’ conception of good citizenship, and (b) conditions that will have implications for good citizenship pedagogies.
      159  16
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Rocking the boat: Critical reflexivity in social studies teachers
    (2018)
    Malathy Krishnasamy
    ;
    ;
    Chua, Shuyi
    This qualitative study examines how critical reflexivity is manifested in and enacted by seven Social Studies teachers, in the Singaporean context of ethnic diversity, increased affluence and socio-political constraints. The cases show that critically reflexive teachers are strongly influenced by their lived experiences to develop good self-understanding and a deep sensitivity to systemic inequalities around them. Critical reflexivity presents as a continuum, with most teachers working towards improving their students’ critical thinking and awareness to inequity through their teaching, while some undertake personally transformative journeys that also effect change in their immediate communities. Findings provide insights on the motivations behind critically reflexive attitudes, and also point to factors that hinder a greater development of critical reflexivity. We suggest that critical reflexivity attitudes can be developed in teachers via programs such as currere, for enhanced teaching practice. Findings also highlight the nuances in the nature of citizenship values in the Asian context, suggesting that critical reflexivity involves small and subtle actions of change and agency in teacher-practitioners.
      91  182
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Differentiating citizens in a democracy: Examining citizenship education in Singapore
    (2012-04)
    Alviar-Martin, Theresa
    ;
    Ho, Li-Ching
    ;
    Across and within democratic societies, youths’ experiences of education for citizenship vary widely. A growing body of research suggests that students’ experiences of democratic citizenship education will differ according to how academic programs, community culture, socio-economic status, and gender intersect with prevailing conceptions of equality, mutual respect, and reciprocity. This qualitative study explores how democratic citizenship education is enacted in two secondary schools with very dissimilar academic programs and policies. A key finding in the study is fissures in perceptions of civic engagement and democratic rights between students from the two schools, thus suggesting that academic programmes and policies can differentiate the manner in which students are groomed to fulfill their roles as citizens.
      189  475
  • Publication
    Unknown
      204  200
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Towards engaged citizens: Understanding Singaporean students’ civic knowledge, participation, attitudes, and participation
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ;
    Alviar-Martin, Theresa
    We adopted the theoretical model of the IEA Civic Education Study (CivEd) described as the Octagon, which reflects an interactive perspective of civic development. The model shows the ways in which the everyday lives of young people in homes, with peers and at school serve as nested context for constructive thinking, learning, and action in the social and political environment. At the centre of the octagon is the student, surrounded by public discourses of goals, values and practice relevant to civic education. The discourses influence the individual through various socialization agents, including the family, peer group, and school. Circumscribing these processes are the ‘macro-systems’, composed of institutions, processes and values in politics, economics and religion, the country’s international position, social stratification, and narratives in national and local communities. In all, 28 nations participated in the IEA CivEd.
      148  11
  • Publication
    Open Access
    WOS© Citations 7Scopus© Citations 10  304  1600
  • Publication
    Open Access
    School-based curriculum development in Singapore: Bottom-up perspectives of a top-down policy
    (2011)
    Leong, Kai Ling
    ;
    ;
    Chua, Seok Hong
    Globalisation has generated an impetus for educational reforms in many countries to ensure economic survival. Singapore's Ministry of Education is encouraging innovation at the parochial level through school-based curriculum development (SBCD). This phenomenon has been well researched in countries with a tradition of decentralisation but, as it appears antithetical to Singapore's entralised system, specific research targeting the local situation is required. Using a case study approach, this research explores teachers' perspectives of their roles in SBCD and the challenges faced. Findings suggest that a form of SBCD can occur without total autonomy and that the difficulties encountered are consistent with existing literature.
      1348  5623