Now showing 1 - 10 of 49
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    Metacognition & mathematical problem solving: Teaching and learning at the primary levels (MetaMaps (Primary))
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2024)

    Metacognition is a feature of Singapore’s Problem-Solving Mathematics Curriculum for more than twenty years, but there has limited formal effort to examine its impact in the mathematics classrooms from both the teaching and learning perspectives. Given the research which links metacognition strongly to success in problem solving and the role which metacognition plays in preparing our students for the 21st Century, this project aims to take on this role with an intention to better develop a plan to prepare primary mathematics teacher in addressing metacognition in the primary mathematics classrooms.

    The objectives of the exploratory project is to develop preliminary teacher conceptions of metacognition and metacognitive instructional practices grounded based on the phenomenon under observation. The project is based on some initial findings as well as theoretical constructs and framework carried out by a doctoral study, one school-based curriculum development project and an in-service course on metacognition for mathematics teachers:

    (a) Doctoral Studies – Lee, N. H. (2008). Enhancing mathematical learning and achievement of secondary one normal (academic) students using metacognitive strategies. Unpublished PhD thesis, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    (b) School-Based Curriculum Development Project – Lee, N.H., Yeo, D.J.S., & Hong, S.E. (2014). A metacognitive-based instruction for Primary Four students to approach non-routine mathematical word problems. ZDM - The International Journal on Mathematics Education, 46(3), 465-480.
    (c) Inservice Course – IME 2055: Metacognition in the mathematics classroom (conducted once a year by Lee, N.H. since July 2009).

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  • Publication
    Open Access
      158  2407
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Mathematics education in Singapore
    (2015) ;
    Wong, Khoon Yoong
    ;
    ; ; ;
    Ng, Swee Fong
    ;
    Dindyal, Jaguthsing
    ;
    Yen, Yeen Peng
    ;
    Loh, Mei Yoke
    ;
    Tan, June Hwee Chiat
    ;
    Tan, Lay Chin
    Mathematics education in Singapore is a shared responsibility of the Ministry of Education (MOE) and the National Institute of Education (NIE) . The MOE overseas the intended, implemented and attained curriculum in all schools while the NIE is involved in teacher preparation and development and also research in mathematics education. Therefore this report has two sections respectively , the first describes the education system and school mathematics curricula while the second briefly provides relevant information on teacher preparation and development and mathematics education research in Singapore.
      508  586
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The use of video recording as a research tool and feedback: Advantages and disadvantages
    (1999-12)
    Chang, Agnes Shook Cheong
    ;
    The use of video-recording as a means of research in psychology is not new but it is not often used in Singapore for a number of reasons. Manpower, lack of technical assistance and time constraints are some comely cited reasons for the reluctance to use video-taping as a form of record taking. But the extensive use of video-recording by Prof. Jim Stigler in a substudy of the TIMSS on the comparison of classroom practices has given compelling evidence on the versatility of the use of video-recording in comparative research. Encouraged by the powerful evidence provided by the TIMSS, the writers have attempted video-recording in a comparative study of classroom practices in primary mathematics. The process of video analysis is undoubtedly time-consuming, but it is also an invaluable learning experience. This paper attempts to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using video-recording as a form of research record keeping and for feedback in learning–teaching situations.
      624  260
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Developing employability skills through SEL competency training
    (2008-11)
    Chang, Agnes Shook Cheong
    ;
    Ee, Jessie
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    Based on a research study of multinational companies in some countries, Brown (2003) stated many CEOs are still in a "war for talents" because few people have "employability" - a quality reflecting one’s self-reliance, personal drive and interpersonal skills. According to Kathleen Cotton, there are 3 components in Employability Skills: Basic Skills, Higher Order Thinking Skills and Affective Skills.
    When interviewed on the expectations of employers for the fourth public university, they expressed unanimously the need to develop soft skills in the graduates of the fourth university. SEL is currently taught to all students at all levels. Through the 5 components of SEL( Self Awareness, Self-Management, Social Awareness, Relationship Management, Responsible Decision Making) which emphasize on self efficacy, perspective taking, appreciating diversity, respect for others, organization skills, cooperation, team work, problem solving and ethical responsibility, the communication, higher order thinking and affective skills required on employability can be fostered in students with relevant experiential learning.
      280  304
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The use of multi comparison groups in quasi-experimental designs
    (2008-11) ;
    Chang, Agnes Shook Cheong
    ;
    Lee, P. Y. (Peng Yee)
    The use of control groups in experimental designs allows the researcher to determine whether a treatment has had an effect or whether one treatment is more effective than another. This is particularly the case for medical and psychological research. However, the use of 'intact classes' in educational research, resulting in the cases of quasi-experimental design, control groups pose a number of threats to the internal validity of such designs. This paper discusses the issues of such designs and the related threats, and proposes a design which incorporates instead suitable use of multiple 'comparison groups' in such designs from the perspective of a study on the mathematical learning and achievement of lower secondary students using metacognitive strategies. It will also be shown how such a use of multiple 'comparison groups' allows for a more cautious and reliable basis for acceptance and rejection of hypotheses, thus providing a way of examining common threats to the internal validity of such studies.
      114  128
  • Publication
    Open Access
    A metacognitive approach in kick-starting the understanding and planning phases of mathematical problem solving
    (2015)
    Hong, Seek Eng
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    ;
    Yeo, Darren Jian Sheng
    Pupils have consistently fared poorly in solving non-routine Mathematical problems and the main obstacle is in understanding problems fully and planning for an effective problem-solving approach. The present study explored the impact of a metacognitive scheme on pupils' ability to solve non-routine Mathematical problems. Using a pretest-posttest design involving 63 pupils from two intact mixed-ability Primary Four classes, pupils' findings revealed that the intervention was effective, to a small extent, in improving pupils' awareness of problems, personal control of their problem-solving behaviour and emotions as well as regulation of their own thinking. Pupils also became more confident and engaged in problem solving, and they ultimately achieved greater problem-solving success. Limitations and instructional implications were discussed.
      460  472
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Translating productive failure in the Singapore A-level statistics curriculum
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020)
    In the recommendations made to the revised Singapore-Cambridge General Certificate of Education Advanced Level (A-level) Mathematics curriculum (Ministry of Education (MOE): Curriculum Planning and Development Division (CPDD), 2015a, 2015b), an emphasis was placed on the use of constructivist pedagogy to deepen students’ understanding of concepts and appreciation of the disciplinarity of the subject, and the development of students’ critical and inventive thinking capacities that are relevant to the 21st century. Current practices in the Junior Colleges (JCs), with its lecture and tutorial system, remain largely didactic with direct instruction being the main pedagogical approach. To support the shift in pedagogical approach, empirically-tested learning designs that embody the constructivist principles, and were proven effective in Singapore’s classrooms were needed.
    This project proposed the use of Productive Failure (PF), a learning design that embodies constructivist principles, empirically tested, and proven effective and tractable in Singapore mathematics classrooms (Kapur, 2008, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014a; Kapur & Bielaczyc, 2012). Given PF’s positive learning outcomes and its alignment to the recommendations made in the revised A-level curriculum, the MOE’s CPDD’s Mathematics Unit collaborated with the PF research team, and through MOE’s existing processes and structures, worked with the JCs to translate the learning design across key concepts in the Singapore A-level Statistics curriculum.
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