Now showing 1 - 10 of 58
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Towards the scalability readiness of WiREAD+
    (National Institute of Education (Singapore), 2022) ;
    Jonathan, Christin
    ;
    ; ;
    Tay, Siu Hua
      82  102
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Multiliteracies in the Singapore English Language classroom: Lessons and resources - Viewing and representing with advertisements lesson package for Secondary Two G2
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2022) ;
    Tan-Chia, Lydia
    ;
    Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha
    ;
    Tan, Jia Min
    ;
    Shafiq Kuthupdeen
      244  148
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Multiliteracies in the Singapore English Language classroom: Lessons and resources - Viewing and representing with Making Ice Cream lesson package for Primary Four
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2022) ;
    Tan-Chia, Lydia
    ;
    Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha
    ;
    Tan, Jia Min
    ;
    Lim, Lynn Lay Cheng
    ;
    Khairunnisa Khairudin
      651  495
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Apps for English language learning: A systematic review.
    (University of Nicosia (Cyprus); Maria Curie-Skłodowska University (Poland), 2024) ;
    Toh, Weimin
    This article reports on a systematic review of research studies published from 2010 to 2021 on the use of apps for learning in the secondary English as a Second Language (ESL) classroom. We extracted relevant information such as the studies’ country/region, research design, sample size, students’ age, apps’ names to conduct a thematic analysis to associate the types of apps and their learning outcomes. The findings suggest that quiz apps support vocabulary acquisition, puzzle apps support vocabulary and grammar learning, platform apps support reading and writing development, augmented reality apps support increased engagement, and virtual reality apps support development of listening and speaking skills. The factors involved in the effective use of apps for learning in the English classroom include the use of quality apps to support the teacher’s pedagogy, the profile and readiness of students to engage in digital learning, and the recognition that a classroom ecology is needed for effective integration of digital resources for teaching and learning.
      13  84
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Multiliteracies in the Singapore English Language classroom: Lessons and resources - Viewing and representing with Ten lesson package for Primary Five
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2022) ;
    Tan-Chia, Lydia
    ;
    Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha
    ;
    Tan, Jia Min
    ;
    Lee, Wen Yen
      689  351
  • Publication
    Open Access
    The scalability readiness of WiREAD+: Perspectives of learners from three educational contexts
    (2022) ; ; ;
    Jonathan, Christin
    ;
    Tan, Jennifer Pei-Ling
    WiREAD+ is a web-based collaborative critical reading and learning analytics environment to scaffold learning and motivate students to develop richer dialogue and quality interactions with peers around multimodal texts. This paper reports on the pilots to scale up the use of WiREAD+ beyond the original context of Secondary School English Language (EL) learning to three distinct educational settings, namely, EL in a primary school, English Literature in a junior college (pre-university), and a tertiary-level Discourse Studies course. We report on learners’ perceptions in response to the use of the system and reflect on the potential and challenges in scaling up the system across different educational contexts, specifically on the three augmentations to the system which we have designed to improve its scalability readiness. Drawing from the findings of the pilot studies, we briefly discuss how we can support the wider adoption and deployment of the system across schools and settings.
      125  151
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Curriculum and assessment mismatch: Examining the role of images in literacy assessments
    (2021) ;
    Tan, Jia Min
    In light of the shift towards incorporating multimodality in the curriculum, it is of interest and value to examine the extent in which multimodal literacy is assessed in national and international literacy tests. This is so as to surface any misalignment between the two and highlight gaps which curriculum planners and assessment designers can address. Given the significant influence that the nature of assessment has in shaping classroom practices and teaching priorities, it is imperative that assessment is aligned with curriculum goals. Our paper examines the assessment items in the visual text comprehension in Singapore’s national examinations, the GCE O’ Level and the Primary School Leaving Examination (PSLE), for the English Language exam, as well as the literacy components of PISA and PIRLS reading items. We adopt the approach of an earlier study by Unsworth, Cope and Nicholls (2019) and position our work as a replication study, extended to a new context. In adopting a common approach, we hope to offer an independent verification of the framework, analyses and findings from the earlier study and contribute towards consolidating and building up proven practices in the analysis of text-image relations within the field of multimodal studies. Our results similarly show an overall low proportion of test items that deal with images and image-language relations in the Singapore and international assessments. While the proportion of questions where the image is essential or supports answering the question is higher for the Singapore GCE O’ Level exams, the role of images in the PSLE and international assessments is limited, which suggests a greater focus on assessing multimodal literacy is required. As curriculum reforms to incorporate multimodality in education become more commonplace around the world, we argue that attention on assessment must be the next frontier of change.
      124  187
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Multiliteracies in the Singapore English Language classroom: Lessons and resources - Viewing and representing with The Lost Thing lesson package for Secondary One G1
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2022) ;
    Tan-Chia, Lydia
    ;
    Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha
    ;
    Tan, Jia Min
    ;
    Lee, Grace Maria
      422  190
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Multiliteracies in the Singapore English language classroom: Perceptions and practices.
    (2020) ; ; ;
    Nguyen, Thi Thu Ha
    ;
    Tan, Jia Min
    ;
    Adams, Jonathon
    ;
    Tan-Chia, Lydia
    ;
    Peters, Charles Matthew
    ;
    Towndrow, Phillip A. (Phillip Alexander)
    ;
    Unsworth, Len
      820  1677
  • Publication
    Restricted
    Cultivating laterality in learning communities in Singapore education system: Scaling of innovation through networked learning community
    (Office of Education Research, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 2020) ; ;
    Kwan, Yew Meng
    ;
    ;
    Imran Shaari
    ;
    Cheah, Yin Hong
    Cultivating teachers to be active and agentic learners is crucial for contemporary teacher education (Lipponen & Kumpulainen, 2011). Those teachers’ qualities are essential in preparing students’ future readiness in an increasingly complex world (P21 Framework Definitions, 2015). In fact, both learning principles and evidence from practice inform us that purposeful collaboration in networked learning communities (NLCs) encourage teacher agency to learn (Lieberman & Wood, 2003; Muijs, West & Ainscow, 2010). As a complement to the literature, we are interested in the development of social relationships among teachers, which enables and facilitates their learning. We propose “laterality” – the relations and networks among peers (e.g., teachers) as an important concept to characterize NLCs.
    Studies on laterality, which have shown to support teacher learning, are usually found in the decentralized systems where individuals are the best entities to form these networks to support each other’s growth (Hargreaves & Goodman, 2006; Muijs et al., 2010). Thus, developing laterality from the bottom-up becomes natural in the decentralized contexts (Granovetter, 1973). Despite considerable theoretical promise of laterality and its increasing prevalence in practice, we wonder whether teacher laterality matters in the centralized education systems, and if it does, how it grows.
      366  19